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Old 11-12-2012, 11:34 PM   #21
Jipper
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Hey All,

Sorry I'm getting to this thread late. I've updated the online documents under the product descriptions. If you click into the kit online, above the description you'll see a tab titled "Documents" - click on that and then on the Recipe Sheet link. Extract is first, all grain will need to be scrolled down to. 2oz. of bourbon oak chunks are included, and we recommend adding them after 6 months (allowing the Roeselare to get going first) - then oak to taste. Another 3-4 months should do it, but the level of oak and sourness is completely up to the brewer!

Tyler King (Senior Director of Brewing Operations for The Bruery) told me that the mash temp should be 158F. When I brewed this I went 154F for 20 minutes, then brought it to 158F for 30 more prior to mashing out and sparging. If you haven't had the beer before it's exceptional. Very well balanced, not overly roasty, and not overly sour (depending on how long you let it go I suppose!)

Hopefully this goes well for all of you and you enjoy it as much as us...cheers!

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Old 11-16-2012, 04:27 PM   #22
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I made an American stout that finished to high for my liking so I am going to try Roeselare in it and see what happens.

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Old 12-02-2012, 11:20 PM   #23
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I just picked up a couple of these kits to brew with a friend. I've got a carboy of MoreBeer's Russian River Consecration that's been going since July, and figured it would be good to have more than one sour in the pipeline since they take so long to make!

One question I had, hopefully Jipper and others can chime in: The directions aren't clear if the Roselare is for primary fermentation or to add it to secondary. It actually doesn't mention secondary at all; is the Roselare really supposed to be left in primary for 6+ months? The brief description I found on The Bruery's website suggests they brewed a base stout, then added a sour blend and aged in oak...

Any insight would be appreciated!

-Carl

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Old 12-02-2012, 11:31 PM   #24
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Sweet, I have a imperial stout second running going with some wicked Pedio and Sacc. Hopefully the Brett will show up in the mail on time. I didnt know about this recipe before hand so I am stoked!

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Old 12-04-2012, 03:42 PM   #25
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Hi Carl,

Roeselare will be the only pitch that you make on the Tart of Darkness. The Bruery goes straight into bourbon barrels and pitches Roeselare. I don't believe they rack it out of the barrels until it's ready to bottle, so it's all done in one fermenter. Hope it turns out well for you!

Cheers.

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Old 12-05-2012, 04:47 AM   #26
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Thanks for the response, Matt! I did a bit of searching about using Roeselare in primary right after posting the question, and your answer confirms my conclusions.

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Old 12-10-2012, 09:52 PM   #27
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Jipper just had a question. The documentation says to expect a pretty low attenuation leaving the beer at 5.6%. Even though the mash temp is pretty high won't the bugs still chomp through the more complex sugar over time? I would hate to create some bottle bombs, just wondering if maybe the bruery pasteurizes or something cuz the few sour beers I have done attenuated a lot.

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Old 12-10-2012, 10:22 PM   #28
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Hey jtejedor,

Thanks for the great question! They didn't mention anything about pasteurizing during our conversations and email threads. I think that you'd be fine, as the actual bacteria in the Roeselare blend are homofermentative: The only byproduct they produce through fermentation is lactic acid. Normal yeast used in brewing is what we'd consider heterofermentative, which means they produce more than one byproduct, usually being ethanol (alcohol) and carbon dioxide.

I'm guessing that the brettanomyces in the Roeselare blend will ferment most of the easily fermentable sugars, but the pedio and lacto will be what gets through the more complex sugar chains, producing no extra CO2. I'll ask Tyler at The Bruery if they pasteurize though, and if it sounds like we should be worried of bottle bombs, I'll make sure to post a warning and will probably send an email to all of our customers that have purchased the kit. For now, I wouldn't worry about it, as I'm almost certain this will not be an issue unless they're bottled too soon, or too much priming sugar is added during bottling. Again - great question, and if you have any others don't hesitate to ask!

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Old 12-11-2012, 05:10 PM   #29
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Brewed my kit a few weeks ago while splitting a bottle with a brewing friend, this thread answered a few questions I had so thanks. I was recently at The Bruery drinking this beer on their brewery tour and found out that the oak barrels they age this beer in is their used Black Tuesday barrels. I have Black Tuesday and was wondering if I should soak the provided oak in Black Tuesday before I toss it in. The package says bourbon oak so I'm guessing the provided oak has already been soaked in bourbon or comes directly from used bourbon barrels.

Very excited for this one

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Old 12-11-2012, 05:56 PM   #30
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Hey fxdude,

First let me say that I'm a little jealous that you got to go on their brewery tour! That would be a fun (and delicious) one to tour...

That's a good question about the oak provided in the kit. The oak is actual chunks from used bourbon barrels, so will add some bourbon/oak flavor and aroma. Soaking them in Black Tuesday might be a good addition, especially because you have some available, however I'm uncertain how much of that you're going to get in the final product. Depending on how much Black Tuesday you have, it might be better just to enjoy every ounce of that, rather than spending some on your oak chunks.

It's my understanding that they use used bourbon barrels for one batch of Black Tuesday, then after that batch is done they fill the barrel back up with Tart of Darkness, but if anyone knows differently please feel free to share!

Hopefully the kit turns out well, and please let us know if you end up soaking the oak chunks in Black Tuesday fxdude! If you do this, just remember that the beer/oak should not be left out too long, or else you'll pickup some unwanted yeast/bacteria that could do more harm than good...I'd do it in a sanitized mason jar and seal the lid right after pouring in the Black Tuesday.

Cheers!

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