The Great Bottle Opener Giveaway

Home Brew Forums > Home Brewing Beer > Lambic & Wild Brewing > Sour mash not sour smelling

Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools
Old 10-03-2011, 04:55 PM   #1
JeffStewart
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Mar 2011
Location: Burlington, NC
Posts: 86
Default Sour mash not sour smelling

So, I set aside a portion of wort to sour, and then add back to the beer after fermentation. So, I set it aside, added some crystal grains to it and let it sit for 3-4 days in a closed container at room temperature. I know the temp is supposed to be higher but just couldn't maintain that. I took a whiff of it today and it doesn't smell sour, at least to me. It smells like concentrated crystal grains, which I think smells great, it's just not what I was aiming for. Any suggestions?

Thanks in advance.

__________________

- Jeff

JeffStewart is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 10-03-2011, 05:40 PM   #2
ReverseApacheMaster
Registered User
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Jul 2009
Location: Keller, Texas
Posts: 4,887
Liked 228 Times on 191 Posts

Default

Raise the temperature. You have to.

You can do the ice/water bath swamp cooler but in reverse. Keep the closed container in a pool of warm water. Periodically add hotter water to keep the temperature up.

__________________
ReverseApacheMaster is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 10-03-2011, 05:59 PM   #3
JeffStewart
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Mar 2011
Location: Burlington, NC
Posts: 86
Default

What's the lowest temp that it'll work at?

__________________

- Jeff

JeffStewart is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 10-03-2011, 08:26 PM   #4
ryane
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Nov 2008
Location: Phoenix, AZ
Posts: 779
Liked 5 Times on 5 Posts

Default

toss it in the oven on warm or use a croc pot on the warm setting

that said Ive never had good luck with sour mashing or sour worting, I think either those that espouse great results are either over stating the effects, are using a very small amount in their overall batch, or have gotten extremely lucky with the microflora on their grain

everytime Ive done it, there is a terrible hot vomit rotting garbage smell that never dissipates, even with boiling. there is a lot more on grain that lactobacillus, unfortunately it seems that all of my grain is covered in enterobacter.....yuck

I think if i do it again (likely) i will make a small "starter" using some crushed grain, then after its fermented out i will decant and use the lees in a new starter. This should drop the pH enough that most of the enterobacter are dead and wont make this flavor/aroma in the final beer

ryane is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 10-03-2011, 09:15 PM   #5
JeffStewart
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Mar 2011
Location: Burlington, NC
Posts: 86
Default

What about instead of sour mashing, would it make sense just to inoculate some separated wort with lacto or something, then once that's done working, boil and add as intended?

__________________

- Jeff

JeffStewart is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 10-03-2011, 10:22 PM   #6
jtakacs
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Feb 2011
Location: Santa Rosa, CA
Posts: 742
Liked 15 Times on 15 Posts
Likes Given: 1

Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by ryane View Post
toss it in the oven on warm or use a croc pot on the warm setting

that said Ive never had good luck with sour mashing or sour worting, I think either those that espouse great results are either over stating the effects, are using a very small amount in their overall batch, or have gotten extremely lucky with the microflora on their grain

everytime Ive done it, there is a terrible hot vomit rotting garbage smell that never dissipates, even with boiling. there is a lot more on grain that lactobacillus, unfortunately it seems that all of my grain is covered in enterobacter.....yuck

I think if i do it again (likely) i will make a small "starter" using some crushed grain, then after its fermented out i will decant and use the lees in a new starter. This should drop the pH enough that most of the enterobacter are dead and wont make this flavor/aroma in the final beer
i use a heating pad - keeps it around 90-110 and mine have always smelled like sour cream - nothing objectionable but noticeably sour..
__________________
jtakacs is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 10-03-2011, 10:37 PM   #7
ReverseApacheMaster
Registered User
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Jul 2009
Location: Keller, Texas
Posts: 4,887
Liked 228 Times on 191 Posts

Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by JeffStewart View Post
What's the lowest temp that it'll work at?
Lacto really needs at least 90F but closer to 120F to get going and outpace anything enteric.
__________________
ReverseApacheMaster is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 10-03-2011, 10:48 PM   #8
bruin_ale
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: May 2009
Location: Campbell, CA
Posts: 1,433
Liked 15 Times on 15 Posts

Default

I sample a 3 day sourmash blonde at NCHF a few weeks ago.. it was fantastic, especially given the warm weather of the day. So it can obviously be done.. I wasn't familiar with enterobacter before that, but had a lambic there that absolutely stank like a diaper pail and discovered that enterobacter is the cause of that aroma - so yeah, I could see how one would want to stay away from that.

__________________
San Jose Homebrew Club - The Grain Trust
bruin_ale is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 10-04-2011, 03:37 AM   #9
joshareed
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Nov 2010
Location: Minneapolis, MN
Posts: 18
Liked 3 Times on 2 Posts

Default

I do my sour mashes and lacto starters in the oven with just the light on. It keeps the temp around a 100. You can also turn it on for a minute or two a couple times a day to inject some more heat.

__________________
joshareed is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 03-03-2012, 02:18 PM   #10
dwscott135
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Apr 2008
Posts: 5
Default

I also did a 3 day sour mash in an ale pale, insulated the hell out of it and used a heating pad periodically on rotating sides of the pale. After 3 days I opened the bucket expecting the putrid smell that everyone talks about, and there was none of it, it actually smelled pretty nice. However, after draining, sparging, boiling and letting finish it's primary ferm. it has a wonderful sour twang and equally pleasant sour smell. Might have just been lucky, but I will repeat this process again. Initially I thought I would add a brett culture to the secondary, but the sourness from the mash was so delightful, I'm just going to let it ride. It's not supposed to be a lambic, just a sour ale.

__________________
dwscott135 is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Reply


Quick Reply
Message:
Options
Thread Tools


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Wanted: Sour beer lovers to taste a sour mash beer OldRalHoleBrewing Lambic & Wild Brewing 12 09-03-2012 04:16 AM
saving sour mash for later use. austinb Lambic & Wild Brewing 3 08-06-2011 02:49 AM
Sour Mash Saison? womencantsail Lambic & Wild Brewing 5 01-17-2011 04:12 PM
Always sour mash for sour brews? jvlpdillon Lambic & Wild Brewing 4 04-27-2010 10:21 PM
Sour Mash Question smellysell Lambic & Wild Brewing 7 04-02-2009 02:51 PM