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Home Brew Forums > Home Brewing Beer > Lambic & Wild Brewing > Sour Mash Ale
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Old 01-19-2013, 12:19 AM   #11
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I guess that is the nice thing about homebrewing. I make what I want, call it what I want and everyone else can do the same.

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Old 01-19-2013, 05:44 AM   #12
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I guess that is the nice thing about homebrewing. I make what I want, call it what I want and everyone else can do the same.

Agreed 100%
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Old 01-19-2013, 12:56 PM   #13
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Well whatever the case may be, I like sour beers and I soured my Kentucky common.That being the case here's an update.

I've begun messing around with my souring temperature for my sour wort lactobacillus delbrukii ferment. I've found that for a two day sour the temperature can be anywhere between 70F and 120F. The closer to 70 the less sour the beer will be. Actually at 70, the sourness is barely detectable and at 120F you get a full on sour bomb. Both ways are delicious, it just depends what you want.

For this beer I decided a hint was better than bracingly sour. I did my lactobacillus ferment at 80F. I would say it is equivalent to a 20% partial sour. Just enough to be noticeable but not over powering.

I pitched 001 last night and she is fermenting away nicely. I'll let you know how it tastes in a week, signs look good as of now.

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Old 01-19-2013, 06:30 PM   #14
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This is a pet peeve of mine but I can't believe that a Kentucky Common was ever soured.

In all likelihood, the "sour mash" comes from confusion with the Sour Mash bourbons that come out of Kentucky.

In this sense, a sour mash is simply a yeast starter: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sour_mash

Rereading this, it sounds like I was pissing on somebody's campfire. Sorry if it came across that way. I was just trying to put out some info.
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Old 01-20-2013, 01:23 PM   #15
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Quote:
Originally Posted by SagamoreAle

Rereading this, it sounds like I was pissing on somebody's campfire. Sorry if it came across that way. I was just trying to put out some info.
Lol - no worries. As home brewers, we all have to have thick skins. (E.g. See posts in "Stupidest comments on your beer" thread.)

As to the history, I've read that it was both soured/not soured. The most logical conclusion to me was that brewers in Louisville (where most was brewed) would have mashed the same way as a bourbon distiller - in the left over soured mash tun. But that could be totally inaccurate.

Fortunately, since this isn't a defined style, I don't think it matters. I've always visioned it as a slightly sour brown, and not a Belgium sour beer, nor a creamed brown ale. But with this one, everybody gets to experiment and define their own style.

Brew happy, SagamoreAle. You left no rain on anyone's parade. The sun is shining, and the water cold. Looks like another great brew day.
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Old 01-21-2013, 04:21 AM   #16
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<snip>The most logical conclusion to me was that brewers in Louisville (where most was brewed) would have mashe d the same way as a bourbon distiller - in the left over soured mash tun.
I'm thinking the same thing. I'm wondering if maybe it was taken away as the "first runnings" from the fermented mash before the distillation process was started. This assumes that it is possible to get any runnings at all out of a fermented mash. Potentially a cheap way of making some $$$ before the long wait involved in aging distilled beverages. This is entirely speculative on my part.

The Wikipedia article on Kentuck Commons is pretty weak. On the positive side, it refers to a book called "American Handy Book of the Brewing, Malting and Auxiliary Trades," Robert Wahl and Max Henius, 1902. I'm going to give that a read on Guttenberg or Google Books and see if there is any solid information about the KC.
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Old 01-21-2013, 04:45 PM   #17
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<snip> On the positive side, it refers to a book called "American Handy Book of the Brewing, Malting and Auxiliary Trades," Robert Wahl and Max Henius, 1902. I'm going to give that a read on Guttenberg or Google Books and see if there is any solid information about the KC.
P. 818 describes Kentucky Common Ale.
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Old 01-22-2013, 01:15 PM   #18
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P. 818 describes Kentucky Common Ale.
What did it say?
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Old 01-22-2013, 05:12 PM   #19
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What did it say?
Here is an image of the page:
kentuckycommon.png  
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Old 01-30-2013, 01:00 AM   #20
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Thought I would update once again on the Kentucky common I made that was inspired by this thread.

I racked it to the secondary, and it tasted fantastic! Sourness was subtle, not overpowering but complimentary. The corn sweetness came through nice. We'll see for sure in a couple weeks when I keg it.

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