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Home Brew Forums > Home Brewing Beer > Lambic & Wild Brewing > Sour Mash
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Old 02-05-2014, 02:26 AM   #1
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Default Sour Mash

I am planning on brewing a quick sour this weekend. I am going to be trying a sour mash for the first time. Is it possible to sour the wort after sparging? If I keep my wort at 100 degrees for 48 hours, will it sour just as much as if the grains were still present in the liquid? To me it just seems easier to do the whole process after sparging. Any ideas?

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Old 02-05-2014, 02:29 AM   #2
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There's a million ways to do it, but yes you can sour after sparge. If you have a way to keep oxygen out, it would be a good idea. Maybe use plastic wrap on the surface of the wort.

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Old 02-07-2014, 12:07 AM   #3
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I brewed a Gose this past weekend...the method I used to sour was adding lactobacillus at 95F, post boil. And after three days I added Wyeast Kolsch to finish things off.

I tasted a sample before adding the Kolsch yeast and it definitely had a sourness to it.

That being said, just as masonsjax says...there really are a million ways to do it. I did a bunch of googling before coming up with my Gose recipe and the three most prevalent ways of brewing a sour seem to be...

1) Sour by way of letting the mash sit for 3 to 4 days before sparging, which seems to be the most 'traditional' way of doing it
2) Sour by adding lactobacillus post boil, let it work for a few days and then add a finishing yeast
3) Sour by adding lactic acid

In any case, please provide an update detailing the method you pick and your final results...

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Old 02-07-2014, 12:13 AM   #4
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I do this for some things. My preferred way is to cool the sparged wort down to around 100 deg and then inoculate it with a hop sack sack filled with a cup of raw grain. I let it sit in the wort for a few minutes then remove. The grain is covered with Lactobacillus and will take off pretty quickly. Once it gets where you want it just boil the wort to kill off the lactobacillus.

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Old 02-07-2014, 01:20 AM   #5
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I do this for some things. My preferred way is to cool the sparged wort down to around 100 deg and then inoculate it with a hop sack sack filled with a cup of raw grain. I let it sit in the wort for a few minutes then remove. The grain is covered with Lactobacillus and will take off pretty quickly. Once it gets where you want it just boil the wort to kill off the lactobacillus.

cluckk...about how long do you let the wort sit before boiling?
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Old 02-11-2014, 10:24 PM   #6
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I ended up mashing then sparging my grains. Once I cooled it to 104, I added 4 oz of acidulated malt and held it there for 48 hours, covered with saran wrap. Really nice sourness. Boiled for 45 minutes and added hops at 15 minutes remaining for 15 IBU. Cooled, and pitched US04. Really nice smell coming through the airlock. Going to add cherries to half, and dry hop the hell out of the other half.

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Old 02-12-2014, 01:21 AM   #7
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Quote:
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I ended up mashing then sparging my grains. Once I cooled it to 104, I added 4 oz of acidulated malt and held it there for 48 hours, covered with saran wrap. Really nice sourness. Boiled for 45 minutes and added hops at 15 minutes remaining for 15 IBU. Cooled, and pitched US04. Really nice smell coming through the airlock. Going to add cherries to half, and dry hop the hell out of the other half.
Good info...keep us updated on how it turns out.
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Old 02-12-2014, 07:51 AM   #8
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I have done a sour mash by mashing then purging the mash tun with CO2 and then pitching in some unmilled wheat. I checked the pH every day until the pH hit 3.2. Then I sparged and boiled. And pitched a clean yeast. Turned out a very clean lactic flavor and good hop flavor. Kept the fermenters lacto free due to the boil pasteurization.

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Old 02-17-2014, 01:04 PM   #9
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If you are not planning on using a strain purchased from a store, and just want to use whatever lacto is on the grain, do you HAVE to add unmilled (and unmashed) grain back to the wort after it is sparged, or can you simply seal it up and keep it at temp for a few days? Basically, is there enough lacto from the mashed grains still viable in the wort after the mash, or do you have to add more?

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Old 02-17-2014, 01:28 PM   #10
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I'm not sure if lacto survives the mash, but every resource I've seen says to throw in a handful of unmilled grain after the mash. It works for me.

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