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-   -   Roselare Blend Fermentation Temperature (http://www.homebrewtalk.com/f127/roselare-blend-fermentation-temperature-181700/)

simcoe4life 06-09-2010 05:37 PM

Roselare Blend Fermentation Temperature
 
So I made a Flemish Red with the Roselare blend two weeks ago. It's been sitting in a hot room covered with blankets (to avoid sunlight) since then. Its been extremely hot outside and the room has had a peak ambient temperature at some times during the day of 80F. I've read that the higher the temp for Roselare, the more acidic quality you'll get in the final product. I've had great results with lower temps -- I usually primary in the low to mid 70's, and secondary around 68F to 70F for a year.

What temps do you normally keep your roselare beer at?

carnevoodoo 06-09-2010 05:57 PM

I had a flanders get hot on me for an extended period of time. I have a 5 gallon carboy full of acid beer at this point. It is only really good for blending. If you're used to doing this a specific way, I'd keep it that way. The heat can do crazy things.

simcoe4life 06-09-2010 07:25 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by carnevoodoo (Post 2102984)
I had a flanders get hot on me for an extended period of time. I have a 5 gallon carboy full of acid beer at this point. It is only really good for blending. If you're used to doing this a specific way, I'd keep it that way. The heat can do crazy things.

Thanks. I actually might just go ahead and blend it right now, young, with some left over cabernet juice. By end of August I should have something interesting.

Ketchepillar 06-19-2010 06:00 AM

This is good too here (wow, I just wrote that. read: "to hear". must be bedtime) as I have a few month old sour with roeselare that was in mid 70s for awhile and I was a little worried, BUT I have an older sour (also with Roeselare) that hasn't developed enough acidity so blending would be alright.

simcoe4life 06-19-2010 11:46 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Ketchepillar (Post 2119883)
This is good too here (wow, I just wrote that. read: "to hear". must be bedtime) as I have a few month old sour with roeselare that was in mid 70s for awhile and I was a little worried, BUT I have an older sour (also with Roeselare) that hasn't developed enough acidity so blending would be alright.

I really think the key to these sour ales is blending. I tasted my friend's gueuze that he finished with strawberry syrup. Slick, sweet, funky, quite nice. Then we broke out my sour golden ale (westmalle yeast with lacto and brux). Dry, earthy, tart. We blended them in a glass, 50/50. The result: one amazing sour ale.

ryane 06-20-2010 12:56 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by simcoe4life (Post 2120586)
I really think the key to these sour ales is blending. I tasted my friend's gueuze that he finished with strawberry syrup. Slick, sweet, funky, quite nice. Then we broke out my sour golden ale (westmalle yeast with lacto and brux). Dry, earthy, tart. We blended them in a glass, 50/50. The result: one amazing sour ale.

The best sours Ive brewed or tasted have always been blended, it took quite awhile for me to get really good at it because its hard to judge a warm flat beer, the thing that really helped me was using a carbonator cap, I could then blend about 10oz of beer, carb and chill


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