Electric Brewing Supply 30A BCS Giveaway!


Home Brew Forums > Home Brewing Beer > Lambic & Wild Brewing > Reusing Roeselare Yeast Cake
Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools
Old 12-11-2012, 08:33 PM   #1
bribo179
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: May 2011
Location: Midwest, Illinois
Posts: 238
Liked 5 Times on 5 Posts

Default Reusing Roeselare Yeast Cake

Right now I am fermenting a Dunkelweizen beer with Roeselare. I have heard this mix does some interesting things as it goes through generational changes. I plan on racking this beer to a better bottle in a month or two to age. I am then going to reuse the yeast cake for another beer.

I had plans of just dumping the next beer into the fermenter, stirring up the cake, aerating, then letting it go to town. Is there any reason I should was the yeast? The whole point of this is to see what the new imbalance and pitch rates will do to the beer.

Anyone have any ideas about this?

__________________
http://ppbco.blogspot.com/
bribo179 is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 12-11-2012, 08:41 PM   #2
stpug
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Nov 2012
Posts: 2,423
Liked 346 Times on 302 Posts
Likes Given: 160

Default

You've just tapped into a can of worms

Edit:
I say give the yeast cake a shot. No need to aerate if you pitch on the cake.

__________________
stpug is offline
adrock430 Likes This 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 12-12-2012, 09:49 PM   #3
Calder
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Mar 2010
Location: Ohio
Posts: 5,585
Liked 264 Times on 237 Posts
Likes Given: 5

Default

I wouldn't wash the yeast. You might wash some of the bugs away.

Traditional washing techniques tries to isolate the yeast. I don't know that the lacto, brett, and pedio (any sherry yeast in this one?) will all be in the same band as the yeast.

I'd try to get the wort as clean as possible going onto the mix to try and keep the resulting cake as clean as possible.

__________________
Calder is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 12-13-2012, 10:51 AM   #4
BryanThompson
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Jan 2010
Location: Louisville, KY
Posts: 337
Liked 22 Times on 19 Posts
Likes Given: 11

Default

It will be fine just using the cake. I put my cake into a gallon jug with apple juice between brews then bottle the juice and dump it into the fermenter with some new yeast when I am ready to use it again.. The juice keeps my bugs alive and makes a great wild brew.

__________________

Brute Brew Works
Primary: Epic Flemish Brown(15g) waiting to go into a bourbon barrel, Brett C. Blackberry Berliner, lambic waiting for fruit
Secondary: Sour Brown Ale from Black IPA second runnings sitting on 2.5lbs. blackberries and 2.5lbs mulberries
Bottled: Traditional Mead aged on Maker's 46 soaked oak, Brett Maibock

BryanThompson is offline
Brann_mac_Finnchad Likes This 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 12-14-2012, 12:24 AM   #5
Calder
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Mar 2010
Location: Ohio
Posts: 5,585
Liked 264 Times on 237 Posts
Likes Given: 5

Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by BryanThompson View Post
It will be fine just using the cake. I put my cake into a gallon jug with apple juice between brews then bottle the juice and dump it into the fermenter with some new yeast when I am ready to use it again.. The juice keeps my bugs alive and makes a great wild brew.
Why apple juice? The sacc will eat all the sugars, leaving very little for the Brett, Lacto. and Pedio.
__________________
Calder is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 12-14-2012, 12:41 AM   #6
rexbanner
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Nov 2008
Location: DC
Posts: 1,376
Liked 94 Times on 67 Posts
Likes Given: 91

Default

http://www.homebrewtalk.com/f72/landers-fred-241728/

Sacc knows his ****, if he does it I say go for it. I've got my first beer with roselare fermenting in primary right now. Not to threadjack, but can someone answer this question? Will pitching an entire pack of roselare into three gallons of wort make it more sour? I know that one pack into 5 gallons won't make a very sour beer (at least within normal sour timeframes). I also pitched some dregs from Spontanale and Monk's Cafe.
__________________

Peep my nanobrewery: http://crookedrunbrewing.com

Crooked Run Brewing: Traditional ales, local ingredients

rexbanner is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 12-14-2012, 10:07 AM   #7
BryanThompson
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Jan 2010
Location: Louisville, KY
Posts: 337
Liked 22 Times on 19 Posts
Likes Given: 11

Default

I doubt there was much if any sacc left in the cake after how long I age my sours. Apple juice is much easier than brewing a one gallon batch. I just pour it in and forget about it.

__________________

Brute Brew Works
Primary: Epic Flemish Brown(15g) waiting to go into a bourbon barrel, Brett C. Blackberry Berliner, lambic waiting for fruit
Secondary: Sour Brown Ale from Black IPA second runnings sitting on 2.5lbs. blackberries and 2.5lbs mulberries
Bottled: Traditional Mead aged on Maker's 46 soaked oak, Brett Maibock

BryanThompson is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 12-14-2012, 11:56 AM   #8
CadillacAndy
Senior Member
HBT_SUPPORTER.png
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
 
CadillacAndy's Avatar
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Oct 2011
Location: Pittsburgh, PA
Posts: 1,056
Liked 104 Times on 87 Posts
Likes Given: 44

Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by rexbanner View Post
Not to threadjack, but can someone answer this question? Will pitching an entire pack of roselare into three gallons of wort make it more sour? I know that one pack into 5 gallons won't make a very sour beer (at least within normal sour timeframes). I also pitched some dregs from Spontanale and Monk's Cafe.
1 pack in to 3 gallons shouldn't really make a difference. The blend of sacch, brett and bugs is balanced. The sacch will reproduce and do it's job first, then the bugs will eat up what's left over. Assuming that it's a relatively fresh pack of yeast.

If anything, the dregs from the other beers will throw off the sacch/brett/bugs balance (in a good way) and will help to get you a more sour beer.
__________________
CadillacAndy is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 12-14-2012, 12:01 PM   #9
bellmtbbq
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Aug 2012
Location: Pennington, NJ
Posts: 564
Liked 29 Times on 26 Posts
Likes Given: 125

Default

Yea more wont accomplish anything. If you want pretty sour, make a small starter to give the bacteria a head start

__________________

Check out my blog! Lambic brewday!

Fathom Brewing

-TF

bellmtbbq is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 12-14-2012, 01:01 PM   #10
ChugachBrewing
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Mar 2008
Location: Portland, Maine
Posts: 522
Liked 166 Times on 84 Posts

Default

For what its worth, a friend and I have done 10 generations of Roselare. It is great for generations 1-3, 4-6 were adequate, and 6+ you get some very very strong acidic flavors that take over the entire beer. 2 was definitely the best in my opinion. Despite varying grain bills, most the beers had a similar "generation 4-10" taste to them that beat the crap out of everything else.

__________________

Check out my new blog brouwerijchuchach for information on fermenting beer, baking bread, pizza, and other experiments.

ChugachBrewing is offline
chronlord Likes This 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Reply



Quick Reply
Message:
Options
Thread Tools


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Reusing Yeast Cake BlakeL Beginners Beer Brewing Forum 10 05-31-2012 03:03 PM
reusing a yeast cake OHIOSTEVE Beginners Beer Brewing Forum 9 10-12-2010 03:09 AM
Reusing Yeast Cake?? 89OctaneStang Fermentation & Yeast 11 04-08-2010 09:02 AM
Reusing a yeast cake ???? OHIOSTEVE Beginners Beer Brewing Forum 5 02-12-2010 08:43 PM
reusing the yeast cake HughBrooks General Techniques 4 04-15-2009 12:13 PM