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Home Brew Forums > Home Brewing Beer > Lambic & Wild Brewing > 'Nieuw Bruin' using 100% Brett L. or B.?
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Old 08-22-2011, 04:22 PM   #11
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Neat idea on the carbonated water. I have never heard that one before, but the theory makes good sense.

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Old 09-15-2011, 11:27 PM   #12
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So I finally brewed this yesterday. I changed up the recipe a bit to use maris otter instead of 2-row, and reduced the munich malt but upped the acid malt a bit. I wanted to use the Wyeast Brett. L. but it wasn't in stock at my LHBS so I used the White Labs Brett. L. instead. I'd have preferred the Wyeast given what you guys are saying about the flavor profiles, but I didn't really want to have something shipped to me when I can buy locally. I'm also impatient. I reduced the hops to 10 IBUs since I've done some more "bitter" beers with all Brett. and I didn't like the result.

The final recipe looks like this:
Nieuw Bruin OG: 1.058

Grain:
43% 5 0 Maris Otter
22% 2 8 Acid Malt (mashed separately)
22% 2 8 Munich Malt
4% 0 8 Crystal 60L
4% 0 8 Aromatic Malt
4% 0 8 Chocolate Malt

Hops:
0.6 oz. Kent Goldings at 60 min. (5.9%AA)

Yeast:
White Labs Brett. Lambicus

I made a 1L starter on a stir plate 24 hours before pitching and tossed the whole thing in there. Brett. L. is sloooow to get going. I barely perceived a cloudiness to the starter even after 24 hours of continuous stirring.

I'll post again when I sample the beer. Right now it's sitting at room temperature (80F) with no real outward signs of fermentation after 24 hours. I got the wort down to 95F with my chiller (it was 101 outside when I brewed), and pitched at that temperature. I figured it wouldn't kill the yeast. I placed the fermenter in an ice bath and brought it down to room temperature within a few hours. I'm sure the yeast weren't happy but they seem to have survived.

One thing I noticed about acid malt... I mashed the 2.5 lbs. of acid malt separately so as to not screw the pH of the rest of the mash. I did 1.5 qts./lb grist ratio for the acid mash, and the stuff instantaneously turned the consistency of oatmeal. It was really bizarre to watch. Was it a mistake to get this stuff milled? I did an iodine test on it after 60 minutes at 149, and it was NOT converted. Then again it was impossible to get a liquid sample from it since it was a goopy oatmeal consistency so who knows... Is this normal for acid malt? I can't seem to find any info about its diastatic power, does it even have any?

EDIT: it occurs to me that the acid malt mash could have such a low pH as to prevent the amylase enzymes from working, but I don't know what pH that is.

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Old 09-16-2011, 04:20 AM   #13
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wild brews pg. 108 says brett prefers a low ph but it also ceases to reproduce below 3.4. That being said, Vinnie Cilurzo also talks about the fact that a larger brett population won't make a beer with more brett character. A small amount can give more somehow.

It takes a long time for Brett to eat up those sugars so I'd second the concerns for sweetness.

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Old 10-18-2011, 12:33 AM   #14
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Just thought I'd post an update. I bottled today after about a month in the primary at room temperature (anywhere between 82 and 72 ambient). The beer finished at 1.024 which I find quite high so it's entirely possible that its not actually finished and that I've just made some bottle bombs*. However, my experience with 100% Brett. beers has been that they finish fast so hopefully it's done. I have no idea why it would have finished so high except that perhaps the large amount of acid malt either (1) really slowed down the yeast (i.e. it's not actually finished) or (2) left a bunch of unfermentables that even Brett. can't chew through? In any case the bottles are being stored in black trash bags so if they explode it's not the end of the world. The beer looked pretty normal but had a bunch of these little white flakes (looked like bits of shaved coconut but even more white than that). Perhaps that was the beginning of a pelicle? I should have taken a picture.

It tasted great though. Perhaps a tad too sweet, but less cloyingly sweet than Duchesse de Bourgogne. Very nice level of tartness, not funky at all really but I can taste some smoky cherry thing going on that has to be from the Brett. I'll post again in a few weeks when it's carbed.

* chance of bombs definitely not helped by the fact that I stuck my entire unsanitized arm in the beer to fix a leaky bottling spigot. Yarrr.

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Old 10-18-2011, 01:22 AM   #15
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I find those white flakes tend to be an indication of lacto but it could be brett.

If you continue to get fermentation in the bottles they probably won't explode for a long time unless they get very hot or experience massive temperature swings over the course of a few hours. Basically, anything that causes the beer to release the CO2 into the headspace. If you keep the beers cool or at a constant in the 70s you shouldn't have a problem for months and months. However I would take as much precaution as possible.

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Old 10-18-2011, 11:51 AM   #16
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Would you suggest chilling/checking the bottles at about 2 months as a precaution? Or chill one every month until your carbonation taste is acheived then push all of it into fridge to make the brett go to sleep?

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Old 11-01-2011, 07:51 PM   #17
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First impressions.

I cracked a bottle after 2 weeks to check for carbonation levels. Definitely not quite carbed yet, but it's getting there. Weak bubbling, no head whatsoever, which could be the lack of carbonation, but also could be something else since I've never gotten any head retention on the other 100% brett beers either.

I like it. The smokey/cherry hints sadly seem to have disappeared, but the beer has a very nice level of very clean tartness with perhaps a tiny hint of spice. I'm not sure if any more acidity would improve it at all. It reminds me of a fuller-bodied and more complex berliner weisse but i like it better than any commercial berliners I've had (with the one exception of the new belgium imperial berliner). I'm not positive since I haven't had one of those in a long time, but i think this ended up somewhat similar in style. The bitterness seems about perfect and the beer is really quite refreshing. Not really sweet at all (strange given the 1.024 FG). This isn't funky (it's very cleanly sour) at all but I'm happy with it. I'm stoked to see how it will change in the next few weeks.

I sort of wonder whether all of the tartness can be attributed to the 2 1/2 lbs. of acid malt, or if there was a lacto infection going on as well... I reuse the same plastic bucket for all my sour beers and I had just transferred a lacto beer out of the bucket the same day I brewed this. It had sanitizer sitting in it for a few hours before I added the wort though. Perhaps the white labs brett. l had a little lacto in it? Those white flakes were definitely suspicious.


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Old 03-26-2012, 07:24 PM   #18
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Any updates?

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Old 03-28-2012, 05:41 PM   #19
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Yes, in short, I do not recommend this recipe.

I haven't been drinking them b/c I don't really like them. The "horsey" funk was subtle, and unfortunately faded very quickly. What's left if a "cidery" tasting sour beer. It's ok, but I don't care for it. I open one every month or so, but so far no change for the better. It tasted best straight out of the fermenter.

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Old 03-28-2012, 07:25 PM   #20
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Quote:
Originally Posted by scone View Post
Yes, in short, I do not recommend this recipe.

I haven't been drinking them b/c I don't really like them. The "horsey" funk was subtle, and unfortunately faded very quickly. What's left if a "cidery" tasting sour beer. It's ok, but I don't care for it. I open one every month or so, but so far no change for the better. It tasted best straight out of the fermenter.
dont give up on it, I had a brett L beer that was funky early on, I thought it had hit its peak around 1-1.5yrs in the bottle, then I opened one the other day and it is an explosion of tropical fruit and cherry
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