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Old 01-27-2013, 10:08 PM   #1
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Default Mash Temp and complexity?

Ok, i'm gonna brew a beer and let it ferment for a year with White Lab Belgian sour mix 1.

Knowing that it's a mix of Sacch, Brett, Pedio and Lacto... and knowing that saccharomyces will eat the fermentable sugars at first, and that brett and bacterias will eat even more sugars, normally unfermentable for the sacch...

Does the mash temp affect the beer sourness/complexity?

Higher mash temp = more ''unfermentable'' sugars = more food for bacterias = more sourness.

Is it right or am I off?

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Old 01-27-2013, 11:26 PM   #2
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That sounds right to me. I've added unmalted wheat and did a turbid mash for my lambic. A turbid mash will leave unconverted starches to the wort which will give the bugs something to eat as they sour the beer.

What style of beer are you thinking of making ?

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Old 01-28-2013, 02:10 AM   #3
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Illuveatar View Post
That sounds right to me. I've added unmalted wheat and did a turbid mash for my lambic. A turbid mash will leave unconverted starches to the wort which will give the bugs something to eat as they sour the beer.

What style of beer are you thinking of making ?
What exactly is a turbid mash?

Sorry my english is not so good... turbid means like troubled (non-clear) ?

Like, doing a 15-30minutes rest at 115-120°F to develop proteins? I actually thought about that...

I'm going to use this recipe:

For 6 gallons

6 lb Pilsner malt
5 lb White Wheat Malt
1.65 lb Local 2 row

1oz Crystal (60m)

1 year primary, then split the batch in 4 or 5 parts, and put on different fruits during secondary (Rasberries, Blackberries, Cherries, Pomegrenata...)
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Old 01-28-2013, 03:42 AM   #4
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In a turbid mash you pull some water out of the mash tun at the end of each rest 113, 138, 150, 162 just before adding more hot water to raise the temperature to the next rest.

The wort you draw out is only partially converted, you heat this part of the wort to 180F to denature the enzymes that convert the starch to fermentable sugars. Doing this keeps a lot of complex starches that the sour bugs like Brettanomyces, Lactobacillus and Pediococcus can eat after the yeast consumes all the sugars.

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Old 01-28-2013, 01:43 PM   #5
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Illuveatar View Post
In a turbid mash you pull some water out of the mash tun at the end of each rest 113, 138, 150, 162 just before adding more hot water to raise the temperature to the next rest.

The wort you draw out is only partially converted, you heat this part of the wort to 180F to denature the enzymes that convert the starch to fermentable sugars. Doing this keeps a lot of complex starches that the sour bugs like Brettanomyces, Lactobacillus and Pediococcus can eat after the yeast consumes all the sugars.
Oh I see... it's kind of the opposite of decoction. It seems really interesting, but I think that this time I'll go simple. It's my first lambic, and also I brew two beers on the same day, so I'll keep it simple, but I will sure remember this technique for the next time!
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Old 01-28-2013, 02:48 PM   #6
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I don't have raw/flaked wheat, and probably won't be able to find some before brew day, but I certainly have a lot of flaked oats. I'm wondering if it could do the trick, at reasonable amount? (I'm thinking a pound or less)

I would prepare the ''oatmeal'' aside with boiling water, and add it to the mash after mashout, to keep some unconverted starch.

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