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Home Brew Forums > Home Brewing Beer > Lambic & Wild Brewing > Making it taste Lambic without being wild
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Old 08-06-2010, 02:26 AM   #21
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I didn't boil it. I probably should have. However i am going for a lambic tasting beer and I figured some uncertain wild stuff might work out well. Going with a fairly experimental approach here. So far it still smells good.

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Old 08-06-2010, 05:01 PM   #22
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I didn't boil it. I probably should have. However i am going for a lambic tasting beer and I figured some uncertain wild stuff might work out well. Going with a fairly experimental approach here. So far it still smells good.
Wasn't the whole point not to do a wild fermentation? Maybe I missed something, but it seems like you forgot about your original purpose...

Don't get me wrong, I think your result will be interesting, but you went from not wanting to a a wild ferment to doing a completely uncontrolled wild ferment.
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Old 08-07-2010, 03:34 AM   #23
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Wasn't the whole point not to do a wild fermentation? Maybe I missed something, but it seems like you forgot about your original purpose...

Don't get me wrong, I think your result will be interesting, but you went from not wanting to a a wild ferment to doing a completely uncontrolled wild ferment.
well, the point was to avoid cultivating the wild bugs in my basement and local area. They are generally not ones I like. The ones on the handful of grain however seem to be much more amenable to being tasty.
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Old 08-08-2010, 01:12 AM   #24
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Wasn't the whole point not to do a wild fermentation? Maybe I missed something, but it seems like you forgot about your original purpose...

Don't get me wrong, I think your result will be interesting, but you went from not wanting to a a wild ferment to doing a completely uncontrolled wild ferment.
The point of the sour mash is that you can cultivate the lacto into your wort before you boil it.

My sour peach has been going for about 2 weeks now and is looking ready to bottle.

I didn't sour the whole mash, infact I only did a small amount. I took 1 gallon of water and brought it up to 130 with some molasses and sugar, then threw in a pound of belgian pils. Instead of screwing with a blanket I just threw it outside for a couple of days. It's been in the high 90's/low 100's the past few weeks. It got nice and sour.

The sample I just took from my carboy is actually pretty nice. Lightly sour, but very refreshing.
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Old 08-09-2010, 09:07 PM   #25
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I brew a Berliner Weisse of sorts that goes from grain to glass in less than a months time. Basically I take the leftover last runnings of whatever beer I recently brewed (usually a wheat) and put it back into the MLT with the spent grains. I let that sit overnight or longer, and drain it when it stinks enough for my liking. This liquid is usually sufficiently sour for a small 2.5/3.5 gallon batch of BW. I add this liquid to to my sparge water, heat it up, and progress with the batch as normal.

I am not saying this method is particularly efficient or better than the other methods suggested. It's pretty much a convoluted sour mash that I recirculate through my mash via a sparge. However, I do like it because the results have been very good (it has a soft sour profile) and it's easy to do.

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Old 08-09-2010, 09:09 PM   #26
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well, the point was to avoid cultivating the wild bugs in my basement and local area. They are generally not ones I like. The ones on the handful of grain however seem to be much more amenable to being tasty.
That makes some more sense...it just seemed like you went from 0-150 over the course of this post. Plus, it seemed like you were avoiding bugs to keep your fermenters and kegs clean.
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Old 08-11-2010, 08:36 PM   #27
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That makes some more sense...it just seemed like you went from 0-150 over the course of this post. Plus, it seemed like you were avoiding bugs to keep your fermenters and kegs clean.
I have no kegs, and I figure I can clean my fermenters to a level I wont be too worried about it. I hadn't realized when I started the thread that there were so many ways to get wild bugs. I also don't want to take years to make my beer which seems to be the normal course of things for a truly wild beer. I don't mind taking a few months, but letting it ferment for years is more than I want to do. I took a sample of this last night (I know it's not close to done, but I wanted to see how it was progressing and i have a bit too much beer in my fermenter anyways, there's no way I will be able to fit it all plus a bunch of peaches in the smaller secondary fermenter) the sourness is not very pronounced, fairly subtle and it is incredibly yeasty, I don't think I sampled either of my stouts this early before and I am really amazed by how much yeast taste it has at the moment. Other than that it is kinda bland, which is ok because I want the peach taste to be fairly prominent. It's also at a gravity of 1.015 at the moment, but still bubbling (I don't mean the airlock, I mean the beer) that plus the really yeasty taste means, to me, that it is still working away at a fairly good clip.
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Old 08-18-2010, 05:10 PM   #28
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Realized my biggest mistake at not boiling the sour mash. If the yeast eat all the sugars from the peaches I end up with a completely dry beer. To have it taste properly peachy I'll need some sweetness but lactobacillus eat lactose. My thought was that if alcohol inhibits lactobacillus I could add lactose after the peaches are all done and let it sit for a week or so to make sure nothing is eating it.

I don't think I have any pedio as the sourness is really really mild and there's not buttery taste whatsoever.

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Old 08-18-2010, 08:36 PM   #29
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Here's the thing. The peaches are pretty much 100% fermentable, at least in my experience they are. So regardless of any lacto being present, your sacc is going to be able to eat all of those sugars anyway.

My peach saison ended up with some very nice subtle peachyness despite how fermentable all of those sugars were.

What's your grain bill and at what temp did you mash? Depending on that, you still might have enough non-fermentables from the grain to keep your beer from being completely dry.

Also do you know that you have lacto or anything else that's wild? Any sort of pellicle forming?

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Old 08-18-2010, 09:53 PM   #30
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No pellicle. There was lacto originally because of the handful of grain, or at least some bug that soured my initial mash nicely. I am expecting all the sugars from the peaches to ferment out as well as almost all from the grains, What I was wondering was what effect sweetening with lactose was likely to have. I know yeast can't eat that and if the alcohol has killed off or strongly inhibited the lacto (or whatever souring bug I had, it smelled like sourdough and tasted nice and clean, definitely not acetic) then I thought it could work to sweeten, but if the lacto eat it all then obviously it wont. I had also heard lacto can kill itself off with high acids, which could be a good thing since I'd like some more sourness in there.

Grain bill was 1 lb of 2 row 3 pounds of pilsen DME and 3 pounds of wheat DME (actually a blend of wheat and barley) The 2 row I mashed at 170 and then allowed to sour with a handful of grain for the cultures for 3 days, then heated to 120 and put in with the DME wort. I figured this would not kill the lacto, or whatever was giving the sourmash such a nice taste and smell. I don't know if it did or not but there's not much sour to it at the moment.

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