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Old 07-10-2010, 01:54 AM   #11
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The only issue I keep hearing about is lacto isn't the only thing all over it.
Lacto isn't the only thing on the grain, but it is the fastest acting of the bunch. Since you're going to boil the wort afterwords, any of the bugs will be killed off. At least that's my understanding. I've had mixed results with sour mashes. My 24 hour sour mash was not very sour, but my 36 hour mash was mouth puckering, eye watering sour. Maybe the grain I used on the first was "cleaner"?

Terje


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Old 07-17-2010, 03:46 AM   #12
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The only issue I keep hearing about is lacto isn't the only thing all over it. I guess one way around it is to get a pure lacto culture from white labs. Oldsock's method of souring half (or some portion) of the beer makes a lot of sense. I think letting the whole batch sour, in addition to the bitterness you'll get out of the peaches, might be over the top without back sweetening.

Making your own lactic acid with lacto cultures is more purist but just adding food grade lactic acid results in the same thing or at least in theory.

Speaking of purists, just be careful to not use the word Lambic when you later describe this beer ;-)
Nope, I've been careful not to so far. It's a peach ale


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Old 07-17-2010, 01:12 PM   #13
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I say Lambic just like I say Kolsch, English Pale Ale, Czech Pils, Munich Helles, and Irish Dry Stout...

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Old 07-17-2010, 03:00 PM   #14
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I say Lambic just like I say Kolsch, English Pale Ale, Czech Pils, Munich Helles, and Irish Dry Stout...
Yep! Because that's what is tastes like the most and everyone knows what you are trying to accomplish.

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Old 07-18-2010, 10:56 PM   #15
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and doing a secondary fermentation on the peaches is part of it
A little help with this part if I may. I just finished a peach saison using over 10.5 pounds of peaches from my peach tree. The sugars in peaches are HIGHLY ferment-able. My saison came out quite dry, but with reasonably subtle peach flavor. I put 3.5 lbs. of it pureed into the last 20 minutes of the boil. 2lbs. in the primary. And then 5 lbs. of cut up peaches during secondary.

So make sure you mash at a higher temperature than you normally would so that there's enough non-fermentables in there. Let me know how your beer turns out. I'm actually about to start a sour peach beer myself. I plan on sour mashing as well.
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Old 07-19-2010, 01:11 AM   #16
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When my barrel hits 12 months this Dec I am going to rack 4 gallons on to 5 pounds of white peaches. The farmers markets are starting to get some really great fruit right now. The plan is to freeze and vacuum pack all the fruit until the lambic is ready.

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Old 08-02-2010, 11:09 PM   #17
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So I started my sourmash, with a gallon of water and 2 lbs of two row. It's definitely doing something, but I don't think I kept it warm enough, it doesn't smell sour so much as like bread dough, I think there's some wild yeast in there. I haven't tasted it, and am considering doing so, but what might happen if I put the gallon of wort in with my other wort without boiling it? It smells tasty so it seems like a good idea to me, but I don't want to end up introducing something that will ruin the batch.

To elaborate slightly I mashed 2 lbs 2 row with a gallon of water, cooled the water down to 110* and tossed in a handful of 2 row, it's been sitting in my basement on top of the hot water heater for about 3 days, but the hot water heater doesn't really transmit much if any heat, so I think the temp has been in the mid 70's. It has plastic wrap on top which I have moved a couple of times to smell it, the first day it smelled slightly sour, now it smells kinda like sourdough bread and it had bubbles in it.

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Old 08-02-2010, 11:23 PM   #18
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The first and only time I've done a sour mash, I let the temperature get down to the 60's 70's, and the smell was atrocious. Boiling didn't help, and after I aged the beer for two months and it still tasted like vomit, I threw the batch out.

Not to scare you off, I hope you have better luck, but I'm not going to try again without careful temperature control. Lacto is pretty lazy at colder temperatures, and there are all sorts of things on that grain you put in there...

EDIT: the fact that yours smells like sourdough is definitely a good sign!

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Old 08-05-2010, 04:21 AM   #19
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So I heated up the gallon of sour mash to about 140, but not for long, pitched that in with the regylar wort and hops and a package of safale 05. I think the sour bugs worked overtime at first, because I didnt cool it quite enough and had a towel around it to block light, Fermentation was slow starting, I pitched another pack of S-05 and now it is happily bubbling away. I am expecting this to turnout pretty sour, but I think that will be a good thing.

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Old 08-05-2010, 01:12 PM   #20
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The first and only time I've done a sour mash, I let the temperature get down to the 60's 70's, and the smell was atrocious. Boiling didn't help, and after I aged the beer for two months and it still tasted like vomit, I threw the batch out.
definitely don't let this statement scare you. i've done a few sour mashes, about 3, and everytime i heat the ~ 140* and pitch the grains and sit back for a few days while that sucker sours up w/ lacto. i wrap with a blanket or 2 and place near the baseboard heat and just let it slowly drop down to room temperature which typically take about 2 days. i've had great successes doing this so don't be shy and give it a try. an aquarium heater in a bucket of water would be best, though. a few days @ 70* may not be the best idea...

i hope you boiled the sour mash (you said you heated to 140*) prior to pitching the yeast. i wouldn't mess around with a non-pastuerized sour mash. you never know what's growing in that thing-


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