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Old 12-28-2013, 05:42 PM   #11
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Originally Posted by njbalazs View Post
Acetobactor is an aerobic bacteria, if I blanket the kettle with CO2 then seal it I can minimize production. I am going to have a hard time maintaining temperature above 110 for 3 days is going to be nearly impossible. I can keep it close for 12.
Yes but there is a good bit of oxygen in the water for it to work with. You could boil the liquor first to drive off some of the oxygen.

In my experience with making BW, using the sour mash method, it takes about ~72 hours before I get the desired sourness and that is keeping it at 105F the entire time. If you aren't able to keep those temps, it might be best for you to boil the wort, cool it and then pitch your lacto and let it work until it reaches your desired sourness level. It will take a lot longer to sour at room temp, possibly up to two weeks.
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Old 12-28-2013, 08:54 PM   #12
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Not that Wikipedia is a reliable source for information, but you must have misread.

From the L. Brevis page: "L. brevis produces more organic acids, specifically acetic acid and ethanol. This means that this bacterium produces an increased acidic environment and alcohol"

L Brevis can also produce diacetyl per Wild Brews p 187.
It produces acetic acid? I suspect that is a mistake. Does anyone know?
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Old 12-28-2013, 09:23 PM   #13
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I don't see why you can't trust cited Wikipedia entries. Especially with studies that have been done in regards to how factual Wikipedia is. However I don't care to argue that. The page does say that it produces acetic acid and ethanol. I Google searched it and multiple sources seem to confirm that the majority of what L. Brevis produces is lactic acid, but it also produces acetic acid and ethanol.

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Old 12-28-2013, 10:08 PM   #14
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It produces acetic acid? I suspect that is a mistake. Does anyone know?
Wild Brews p111-112.
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Old 12-29-2013, 10:26 PM   #15
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In my experience 299v is not hop sensitive.
I brewed a ~3 IBU gose that used 299v and it did not sour at all. I'll have to try it again.
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Old 12-30-2013, 12:11 AM   #16
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I decided to make a starter for my sourkraut juice, over night it got to 150°F. I can't find anything on what temp will totally kill lactobacillus, i assume it will be fine, but would rather not assume. Can someone enlighten me?

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Old 12-30-2013, 01:04 AM   #17
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I devices to make a starter for my sourkraut juice, over night it got to 150°F. I can't find anything on what temp will totally kill lactobacillus, i assume it will be fine, but would rather not assume. Can someone enlighten me?
I think pastuerization is 145 for 20 minutes. I think that is enough to kill Lacto.
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Old 12-30-2013, 03:28 PM   #18
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I decided to make a starter for my sourkraut juice, over night it got to 150°F. I can't find anything on what temp will totally kill lactobacillus, i assume it will be fine, but would rather not assume. Can someone enlighten me?
Depends on how long it stayed at 150F. At that temperature, it takes about an hour to reduce cell count by x2 and ~3 hours to reduce them to a minimal count.
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Old 12-30-2013, 03:57 PM   #19
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Both L. brevis and L. plantarum are heterofermentive, producing lactic acid in addition to ethanol (or acetic acid) and CO2 from glucose.

The other species you listed (L. acidophilus and L. delbrueckii) are homofermentive.

Check out this link for some basic info.

OP, are you adding sauerkraut juice just because you have it on hand as opposed to purchasing the cultures needed? Or as an experiment?

Acetobacter should not be in your kraut (unless it is a contaminant). The genus Leuconostoc is more commonly used in kraut preparation, in addition to the Lactic acid bacteria.

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Last edited by ColoHox; 12-30-2013 at 04:03 PM. Reason: word order
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Old 12-30-2013, 04:10 PM   #20
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Quote:
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It produces acetic acid? I suspect that is a mistake. Does anyone know?
The heterofermentive bacteria can produce acetate.

The PDF shows the metabolic pathways, if you're interested.
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