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Home Brew Forums > Home Brewing Beer > Lambic & Wild Brewing > Howto: Capture Wild Yeast
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Old 02-17-2013, 11:13 AM   #901
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Hey guys I need some thoughts. I did a brew yesterday (belgian strong), and did that thing where you get tired after cleaning and left the hydro sample out and forget about it. So, just before lunch time today I noticed it had gotten a bit cloudy, poured myself a beer and left it there.

I went back tonight... and a lot of stuff was happening in there. Mini fermentation.



Now there is a chance that I had tiny amounts yeast matter left in the cylinder. I dont wash it too thoroughly between brews but it does get a decent rinse out. Even if this is this case, I would have thought it would take more than 24 hours to reach this level of fermentation from such a small amount of yeast.

I am guessing that its probably some old yeast, mixed with bugs around my garage. I have had some definite brett infection in the past. (tasted bloody good!)

Whats happened here? I am curious so poured it off into a jar and put some foil over it. I intend to see what it results in. This is another two hours later:



PS: I have since added another third clean water. OG was 1.072 afterall

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Old 02-27-2013, 06:25 AM   #902
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Default Removing Pathogens fro wild yeast capture

900 replies and Im not sure if this has been covered.....

So using straight up Sacc as a fermentation source creates alcohol which theoretically is a fairly inhospitible environment for a lot (not all) pathogens. Translating this I was wondering if making up some unfermented wort as a nutrient source and dilute it with some vodka (mathematics needed here) to about 3-10% would kill a lot of the alcohol intolerant bugs whilst creating a survivable environment for the yeast that can survive in an alcoholic environment and then expose this to air and see what I get.


e.g: e-coli/shigella/salmonella is something i dont want but any wild sacc/brett/pedio/lacto I do and from a quick search on the net, all three pathogens have some form of vulnerability to alcohol.

Is that an idea? Has it been covered in this already or is it just plain dumb?

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Old 02-27-2013, 02:22 PM   #903
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e.g: e-coli/shigella/salmonella is something i dont want but any wild sacc/brett/pedio/lacto I do and from a quick search on the net, all three pathogens have some form of vulnerability to alcohol.

Is that an idea? Has it been covered in this already or is it just plain dumb?
It is an idea, but I think lowering the pH to ~4.3 with some food grade acid is a safer idea. There is a lot more research on the pH required for growth of the various pathogenic microbes, and it is something that some Belgian lambic brewers (and American breweries trying spontaneous fermentation) are doing to keep things safer.
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Old 03-06-2013, 02:39 AM   #904
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It is an idea, but I think lowering the pH to ~4.3 with some food grade acid is a safer idea. There is a lot more research on the pH required for growth of the various pathogenic microbes, and it is something that some Belgian lambic brewers (and American breweries trying spontaneous fermentation) are doing to keep things safer.

Good idea.... Do you know of any issues with agar plates with the pH so low?

Am gg to do some DME and citric acid to get it down.
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Old 03-07-2013, 09:23 PM   #905
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Good idea.... Do you know of any issues with agar plates with the pH so low?

Am gg to do some DME and citric acid to get it down.
I haven't made an agar plate since high school. I'd assume you have fewer concerns using plates than wort as you'll be able to select which cultures you want to pitch? Maybe look into selective media: http://bkyeast.wordpress.com/experiments/
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Old 06-03-2013, 01:57 PM   #906
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This thread really should be unstickied, locked and buried in a deep hole. While the first post sort of contains some facts, it's also open to misinterpretation. The following 25+ pages (that's as much as I could manage) mostly serve to lead people further astray.


Capturing and isolating yeast *is* actually fairly simple. Here's my recipe:

Prepare a wort sample, inoculate it in open air for a couple of hours or over night (or just throw in some fruit peel), then let it ferment for two weeks. The alcohol created by fermentation eventually kills off a lot of the undesireables.

If the final gravity is OK and whatever you're left with isn't too gross, now you have something to keep working with.

This is when you take samples for your petri dishes. Or you could just wash and pitch it in a starter if the remaining infections don't bother you.

Outside temperature, city pollution and whatever else is given serious weight in the first 25 pages really have very little to do with it, and yet again, I think a sticky that doesn't start off like that is in order.

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Old 06-03-2013, 07:02 PM   #907
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This thread really should be unstickied, locked and buried in a deep hole. While the first post sort of contains some facts, it's also open to misinterpretation. The following 25+ pages (that's as much as I could manage) mostly serve to lead people further astray.

Capturing and isolating yeast *is* actually fairly simple. Here's my recipe:

Prepare a wort sample, inoculate it in open air for a couple of hours or over night (or just throw in some fruit peel), then let it ferment for two weeks. The alcohol created by fermentation eventually kills off a lot of the undesireables.

If the final gravity is OK and whatever you're left with isn't too gross, now you have something to keep working with.

This is when you take samples for your petri dishes. Or you could just wash and pitch it in a starter if the remaining infections don't bother you.

Outside temperature, city pollution and whatever else is given serious weight in the first 25 pages really have very little to do with it, and yet again, I think a sticky that doesn't start off like that is in order.
Wow wow easy captain. I agree there is a lot of misinformation going on but this is a popular thread. Some people are interested in isolating the strains, some people are interested in brewing with whatever falls in (consortia) and there are people who get contaminations. That all together makes a nice mix of interests and sometimes we might get a little side tracked.

Outside temperature is quite important. Gueuze breweries only brew during the colder months, because bacteria will take over if its too warm. If you want to brew spontaneous, you need to keep that in mind. Yeast will grow but you will have a nice enteric taste going on as well perhaps not the nicest.
Fruit peel does not contain a lof of yeasts, it is a big misconception. Only damaged fruit carries serious weight in yeast.

I agree that catching yeasts is quite straightforward. But I have only tried it in a handful of places and I cannot know how it will be somewhere else. And I have had my failures as well.

Perhaps you could do a nice writeup?
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Old 06-03-2013, 11:59 PM   #908
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Wow wow easy captain. I agree there is a lot of misinformation going on but this is a popular thread. Some people are interested in isolating the strains, some people are interested in brewing with whatever falls in (consortia) and there are people who get contaminations. That all together makes a nice mix of interests and sometimes we might get a little side tracked.
By all means. I like the topic, but because of all the misinformation and bad practices in the first 25+ pages, which isn't people getting going off on tangents, I don't think this thread makes a decent intro to wild yeasts and should be stickied with "howto" in the subject line.

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Outside temperature is quite important. Gueuze breweries only brew during the colder months, because bacteria will take over if its too warm. If you want to brew spontaneous, you need to keep that in mind.
I think I came across one reference to something along those lines. The recurring theme, though, was that high temps lead to too much mold, which makes yeast capture infeasible.

I certainly don't have all the right answers and think the people who have been keeping this thread alive would do better at starting a new sticky if that's what you're suggesting. Just keep your audience in mind; anyone without a decent lab should certainly ferment something before they bring out the agar. And not dump the jar over a little mold growth before the brewer's yeast kicks in.
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Old 06-08-2013, 03:54 PM   #909
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perhaps someone can provide some advice or insight.

I Brewed what would have been a cream ale(minus typical American ale yeast) but brought the gravity up to about 1.060 in the last 10 minutes with pure maple syrup. When the boil was finished I covered the kettle with a cheese cloth, "coolshipped", and left it right where it was for about 2 days.
Then (without any visible sign of life) I decide to trust that something must have inoculated the wort. Siphoned to a carboy and air-locked it up. Within about one more day (total on day 3 since brewed) I had a small krausen forming. In 2 more days a decent 1-2" krausen and the airlock rocking. This went for about 9 days from there, bubbling hard until finally slowed down and the krausen fell about 2 days ago. Those numbers are rough estimates but today is day 15 for sure. No more krausen no more airlock activity, and I checked the gravity. 1.050?? It looked to be going so strong. Most of what I have been reading from previous posters in the thread seemed to indicate very fast fermentation. I am wondering have some experienced slow ferments? or maybe I captured a non alcohol tolerant strain? I know it isn't uncommon to let a wild beer sit a long time to fully develop its funk, but at this rate, purely from an attenuation stand point, to get down to a decent FG, it will take about another 2 months. That is if the yeast is still active, (I will check grav again monday) Any thoughts?

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Old 06-10-2013, 03:57 PM   #910
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perhaps someone can provide some advice or insight.

I Brewed what would have been a cream ale(minus typical American ale yeast) but brought the gravity up to about 1.060 in the last 10 minutes with pure maple syrup. When the boil was finished I covered the kettle with a cheese cloth, "coolshipped", and left it right where it was for about 2 days.
Then (without any visible sign of life) I decide to trust that something must have inoculated the wort. Siphoned to a carboy and air-locked it up. Within about one more day (total on day 3 since brewed) I had a small krausen forming. In 2 more days a decent 1-2" krausen and the airlock rocking. This went for about 9 days from there, bubbling hard until finally slowed down and the krausen fell about 2 days ago. Those numbers are rough estimates but today is day 15 for sure. No more krausen no more airlock activity, and I checked the gravity. 1.050?? It looked to be going so strong. Most of what I have been reading from previous posters in the thread seemed to indicate very fast fermentation. I am wondering have some experienced slow ferments? or maybe I captured a non alcohol tolerant strain? I know it isn't uncommon to let a wild beer sit a long time to fully develop its funk, but at this rate, purely from an attenuation stand point, to get down to a decent FG, it will take about another 2 months. That is if the yeast is still active, (I will check grav again monday) Any thoughts?
This is not unusual. I have isolated many strains that only will ferment very briefly, and not too far down. Probably not a saccharomyces you have there being active but that is just guessing from my side. Check http://www.bjcp.org/docs/LagerYeast.pdf page 9 Diego Libkind presentation has a copy from a table showing what I mean. Good things happen to those who wait perhaps Sacch/Brett is there but just in small numbers. 2 months is not very long for a coolship inoculated beer.
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