Happy HolidaySs Giveaway - Winners Re-Re-Re-Drawn - 24 hours to Claim!

Get your HBT Growlers, Shirts and Membership before the Rush!


Home Brew Forums > Home Brewing Beer > Lambic & Wild Brewing > Howto: Capture Wild Yeast
Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools
Old 05-12-2011, 08:42 AM   #491
drummstikk
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: May 2010
Location: Palo Alto
Posts: 254
Liked 24 Times on 18 Posts
Likes Given: 27

Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by jtakacs View Post
thought i'd have seen a better AA. oh well.
Hey, don't worry about the AA for now. You are probably one of the few people around here who hasn't contaminated their collection vessels with domesticated yeast.

Wild yeast are evolved to grow in tree sap and rotten fruit, so you wouldn't expect a wild strain to attenuate well, or even to taste good. Breweries spent hundreds of years selecting yeast for attenuation and taste. If you think that you set out a collection vessel and caught a wild yeast that attenuates to 75% AA with just a tinge of Brett...well, you probably have contamination with a domesticated strain.

I have a difficult enough time isolating the strains I catch and making sure they produce alcohol. Producing good flavors and good attenuation is really the second step, involving rounds of screening and selection.
__________________
drummstikk is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 05-16-2011, 06:46 PM   #492
jamesjensen1068
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Jan 2010
Location: Omaha, NE
Posts: 366
Liked 9 Times on 9 Posts
Likes Given: 1

Default

On saturday nite I boiled 650ml of water and 1/2 cup of light DME in a 2000mL Erlenmeyer Flask covered with cheese cloth, temps that nite were in the 40 to 50 range. I set the starter next to an open window. The wind was blowing directly into the window.

By the next morning (yesterday) I noticed small bubbles around the edge of the liquid. So I removed the cheese cloth and covered with sanitized aluminum foil. I gave the flask a swirl about 5 times yesterday as I don't have a stir plate. Noticed more bubbles along the sides this am. No krausen yet.

Do you thinks overnite was long enough to get something started??

Cheers

__________________
jamesjensen1068 is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 05-16-2011, 07:35 PM   #493
jaapie
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Jun 2008
Location: Ashburn, VA
Posts: 145
Liked 1 Times on 1 Posts
Likes Given: 4

Default

Yes something probably has fallen in. You might not get krausen quick, the yeast might like to sit at the bottom and only later you will see some foam. If you have bubbles I would say that is a good sign.

I isolated 11 different yeast strains a month or so ago, tested if they could ferment maltose, and am fermenting 11 different gallon flasks with wort as we speak. The pre-cultures I grew in a shaker in small flasks in the lab I work in which is an advantage for me, I have all the means to do microscopy and culturing here. It was amazing to see the difference in how they behave in actual wort. Some of them form huge krausen, some sit at the bottom but you see a continues stream of bubbles, and in one case the fermenting wort turned so viscous it is almost jelly. Some ferment tremendously slow and a few started really late.

Hard to say what is going on right now I would just wait.

__________________
jaapie is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 05-16-2011, 08:03 PM   #494
jamesjensen1068
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Jan 2010
Location: Omaha, NE
Posts: 366
Liked 9 Times on 9 Posts
Likes Given: 1

Default

jaapie,

Thanks for the words of experience. RDWHAHB it is then. I'll report back later.

Cheers

__________________
jamesjensen1068 is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 05-20-2011, 05:24 AM   #495
jtakacs
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Feb 2011
Location: Santa Rosa, CA
Posts: 742
Liked 16 Times on 16 Posts
Likes Given: 1

Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by drummstikk View Post
Hey, don't worry about the AA for now. You are probably one of the few people around here who hasn't contaminated their collection vessels with domesticated yeast.

Wild yeast are evolved to grow in tree sap and rotten fruit, so you wouldn't expect a wild strain to attenuate well, or even to taste good. Breweries spent hundreds of years selecting yeast for attenuation and taste. If you think that you set out a collection vessel and caught a wild yeast that attenuates to 75% AA with just a tinge of Brett...well, you probably have contamination with a domesticated strain.

I have a difficult enough time isolating the strains I catch and making sure they produce alcohol. Producing good flavors and good attenuation is really the second step, involving rounds of screening and selection.
took a turn for the uhhh... different?

sat for five weeks, gravity bottomed so i figured i'd rack it to a new container and harvest the yeast so i could reuse it. well, within days of it being in the new carboy, it formed a pellicle. i was thinking it could hit a bottle within a couple of months, but now it will hang for a while.. gorgeous pellicle too... really have to take some pictures.
__________________
jtakacs is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 05-29-2011, 02:06 AM   #496
BenjaminBier
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Mar 2010
Location: Portland
Posts: 257
Liked 6 Times on 6 Posts
Likes Given: 14

Default

howdy all, i also gave capturing wild yeast a try. I stuck a cup of apple juice in a mason jar out in the garden for about 6 hours, brought it inside and covered with foil, and let it sit on top of the fridge for about 10 days.

It started getting some nice bubbling and a sediment formed, smelled like tart apples. I pulled off the liquid with a turkey baster and added a cup of wort to the jar, it developed a nice looking krausen and started smelling estery and phenolic. Added another cup of wort, let that ferment for a few days, started smelling really really estery, lots of fruit and pepper, added another bit of wort to it and it started going fruity, peppery AND bubblegummy.

So i brewed up a batch of german hefeweizen and pitched about a liter of this starter, it took off and was cranking out some major odors. think rhino farts mixed with sour fruit.

Now i'm about 4 days in and the odors have died down, it's smelling very peppery and bubblegummy, a little tart. I had reserved a little bit of the started and built it up again, it looks like it's mostly fermented out today so I had a taste, very strong but pleasant yeast character.

woot!

__________________

pandas are bears

BenjaminBier is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 05-29-2011, 02:18 AM   #497
mhenry41h
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Jan 2011
Location: Harrisburg, Pennsylvania
Posts: 896
Liked 6 Times on 5 Posts
Likes Given: 1

Default

Subscribed

__________________

Fermenting: Lambic and Dry Orange Blossom Mead
Conditioning: Brett Drei Golden Strong
Next: Nut Brown, Wee Heavy, & Rye IPA
Drinking: Brett - Aussie Blonde, Black IPA, Belgian Stout, Munich Helles

Follow My Brewing Excursions at:

http://<br /> <font size="5"><font ...</font></font>

http://www.facebook.com/pages/Dracon...58343357538490
___________________
Draconian Libations

mhenry41h is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 06-02-2011, 06:22 PM   #498
KraphtBier
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Apr 2011
Location: New Bern, NC
Posts: 292
Liked 2 Times on 2 Posts

Default

I accidently left a hydro sample on my counter from a wheat beer I brewed a week and a half back. I pitch dry yeast (mostly) and I am pretty anal about sanitary working conditions so I don't think I "accidently" added any yeast to the sample. Anyway, it fermented away like a champ and sorta smells like sour pears. I've boiled up some DME and pitched the slurry into 200 mL of wort to use eventually in a test batch after I grow it up to the right amount.

The question then: What area the odds this is something wild? I'm thinking it's probably one of the strains I use (I cycle through S-04, 05, and WB-06 on a regular basis), but it sure doesn't smell anything like any of them.

__________________
KraphtBier is online now
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 06-02-2011, 07:57 PM   #499
drummstikk
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: May 2010
Location: Palo Alto
Posts: 254
Liked 24 Times on 18 Posts
Likes Given: 27

Default

It's hard to say whether you have contamination of your domesticated strains without a control. When I collect wild yeast, I split my wort into two flasks. I open one to the atmosphere and leave the other closed. If I get fermentation in the closed flask, then I know the flask itself contained some yeast.

Even then, it's still possible to catch your own strains, if for example you ever dump yeast sediment in your garbage can (or even if you spill the beer in your glass) -- a fly can easily transfer your own strain back to your collecting flask.

If you do the control and collect at a different site than where you brew, I'd say you can be confident you've caught wild yeasts.

Another method, which I've recently given up on, is to collect straight onto a plate. You can be sure you don't have contamination with this method, but the problem is that most of the things that will grow on a plate are not good for brewing. You need some selection step first, such as growing in wort.

On the other hand, a combination of domesticated and wild stuff is just as interesting and tasty, so maybe just don't worry about it and enjoy!

__________________
drummstikk is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 06-02-2011, 08:28 PM   #500
jaapie
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Jun 2008
Location: Ashburn, VA
Posts: 145
Liked 1 Times on 1 Posts
Likes Given: 4

Default

I agree with Drumstikk, it is hard to say what it will be. If you brew a lot, you will be amazed what is flying around in your fermentation area just in the air.

To come to the plate topic, what I have done is collect yeast in wort, and then plate the fermenting wort on a plate with a spreader, and pick colonies like that. Of course you will miss the slow-growing micro-organisms, or organisms which do not like to grow on certain plate media (like Pediococcus and what not). But you gain a little more control.

I did this for 8 wild yeasts, and as a "control" took 3 pure strains i isolated from a Gueuze bottle. Two of them fermented pretty fast and smell/taste really nice. The other ones smell not very nice, although they are steadily fermenting, and taste like licking a wet-basement wall.

Either way, no worrying and enjoying the experiment is the way to go. If it tastes good, then it is a success.

__________________
jaapie is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Reply



Quick Reply
Message:
Options
Thread Tools


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Beginner extract brewing howto pompeiisneaks Beginners Beer Brewing Forum 190 Yesterday 06:32 PM
How can you capture/culture wild yeasts? Reddy Recipes/Ingredients 10 06-23-2013 01:50 AM
Yeast Bank- Wild Yeast/bacteria Jsta Porter Lambic & Wild Brewing 7 04-21-2009 02:20 PM
Yeast cultivated from bottles... Which ones and HOWTO? beergears Recipes/Ingredients 6 01-18-2008 08:37 PM
Howto babysit your beer from work UNOmar General Beer Discussion 13 02-08-2006 09:35 PM



Newest Threads

LATEST SPONSOR DEALS