Home Brew Forums

Home Brew Forums (http://www.homebrewtalk.com/forum.php)
-   Lambic & Wild Brewing (http://www.homebrewtalk.com/f127/)
-   -   Help formulating an all Brett C. session beer (http://www.homebrewtalk.com/f127/help-formulating-all-brett-c-session-beer-158283/)

scone 01-21-2010 01:09 AM

Help formulating an all Brett C. session beer
 
The Horse of a Different Color transcript plus the Minstrel Brett C post has inspired me to whip up an all Brett C. recipe of my own. The idea of a "clean", "spicy" and fast-fermenting Brett beer really appeals to me. I have no experience creating recipes so I'm really jumping in the deep end here. I just placed an order for While Labs WLP645 (the Brettanomyces Claussenii) and I have a little while to assemble ingredients before it arrives.

I want to create something pretty light, and easy to drink, with not too much complexity going on. I'm thinking something like a Rye Pale Ale. (I've been drinking a lot of the Real Ale Full Moon Rye Pale Ale, and it just begs for a bit of funk in my opinion). Here's what Real Ale has to say about it:
"Tawny red and full of malt and hops, Full Moon's unique flavor truly satisfies. The smooth sweetness of malted rye and barley is complemented by generous helpings of Willamette and Cascade hops, resulting in an assertive American amber ale.
ABV: 5.7%, IBU: 42, OG(plato): 14 "
So that gives me a good start. I will be doing a mini-mash and I have the capacity to mash about 6 lbs. of grain if I'm pushing it. Let me try to take this one ingredient at a time.

Grain bill
8 oz. honey malt (not sure about this, but it sounds nice)
8 oz. acid malt (is this too much?)
1 lb. red malted wheat
2 lb. malted rye
2 lb. 6-row pale (does this have enough diastatic power to convert all that?)
? LME to make up the gravity difference

Hops
I have no idea here, I was thinking Willamette for bittering and Cascade for 5 min. and flame out but I'm not sure about quantities. I'm trying not to overpower the funk with hopiness or bitterness, so maybe I should cut back on the IBU's since the Brett will take the beer drier then Sacc. would (thus leaving less residual sugar to balance it out)?

Yeast
100% WLP645, Brett C. I am thinking 1 gallon starter using LME, 5 days in advance, and pitch the whole thing. I don't have a stir plate. I'm thinking that I'm not going to aerate the starter OR the beer since I've read that Brett C. does pretty well with no oxygen.

I'd love some feedback about this. I thought about posting this in the Recipes section, but I feel like the 100% Brett C. beer probably needs some special consideration. There's not a single thing about the recipe that I'm not willing to change so let me know your concerns! :p

flyerwire 01-21-2010 03:56 PM

i'm also interested in doing something along the lines of Victory's Wild Devil and had a bunch of the same questions as you have, although i'm looking for a balance between the hopiness and funk... i'd be interested in what other people say, and i'll be watching this thread.

wetherel 01-21-2010 04:06 PM

I want to you do it with 100% Brett C, because I'm curious to see someone else get the same sourness that SteveG got. I was worried I wouldn't get the same sourness, so I pitched a nice sized lactobacillus starter at the same time as the Brett C, and didn't use any hops so the lacto would be happy. It turned out pretty sour in less than a couple of weeks and now after a few months it is very sour, with the classic pineapple aroma of Brett C. It tastes kind of like a dry pineapple juice. It's great. I might add some hop tea to it, if I ever get around to bottling it.

android 01-22-2010 11:23 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by flyerwire (Post 1826828)
i'm also interested in doing something along the lines of Victory's Wild Devil and had a bunch of the same questions as you have, although i'm looking for a balance between the hopiness and funk... i'd be interested in what other people say, and i'll be watching this thread.

check out this thread, saq has graciously answered a bunch of my questions about doing an all brett L. IPA, similar to wild devil.

http://www.homebrewtalk.com/f12/muse...53/index2.html

flyerwire 01-23-2010 11:31 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by android (Post 1830881)
check out this thread, saq has graciously answered a bunch of my questions about doing an all brett L. IPA, similar to wild devil.

http://www.homebrewtalk.com/f12/muse...53/index2.html

that is awesome! apparently my search skills suck because i definitely did not find that. Thanks!

Bsquared 01-24-2010 12:47 AM

I have done two all brett C. beers in the past few months(Late hop Amarillo bitter, and a triple). The first I stepped up a starter from 1L to 2L. The Brett. vials from white labs contain a lot less yeast because they are intended to be used for secondary fermentation. I believe there are ~10 billion cells per-vial, but that just off the top of my head right now. You will probably need 200-300 billion yeast for your grain bill.

I found that brett.c for the most part acted just like sacch and did 95% of the fermentation in the first 4-5days. I let it go a few more weeks and got the FG down to 1.004.

don't be afraid of the smell when it is fermenting, it really has a vomit and raw sewage smell at first, but it goes away. after the yeast starts to get stressed, it starts to produce a pineapple/tropical fruit aroma. The flavor is not terribly unique, I think my next brett beer will use Brett.C for primary fermentation, then age it with Brett L to get some good funk.

I'm thinking a Farmhouse saison like Le merle from north coast brewing.

Good luck,

The babble belt is also a good resorce for working with Brett.

Jaymo 01-30-2010 05:45 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by wetherel (Post 1826862)
I want to you do it with 100% Brett C, because I'm curious to see someone else get the same sourness that SteveG got.

I got decent sourness in my All-Brett C. (No other bugs in mine.) It also ended up on the high end with a FG of 1.016, but the residual sugars worked out really well in balancing out the acidity. It's among the best tasting beers I've brewed to date. The only annoying thing is it has zero head retention.


Scone: Brett C, as a primary yeast, is the slowest of all the commerial strains in getting started. When the starter is pitched into your wort, don't be surprised or worried if there's a lag time of several days before you see any activity.

scone 01-30-2010 02:09 PM

Jaymo, did you get a lot of pineapple or was it subtle, or non-existent? There's been a few discussions about the pineapple flavor of Brett C. (which I'd just as soon avoid) on babble belt but I haven't found any definitive answers on which conditions create those flavors.

Bsquared 01-30-2010 03:31 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by scone (Post 1849161)
Jaymo, did you get a lot of pineapple or was it subtle, or non-existent? There's been a few discussions about the pineapple flavor of Brett C. (which I'd just as soon avoid) on babble belt but I haven't found any definitive answers on which conditions create those flavors.

I found that there was no pineapple flavor, but the pineapple/passion fruit aroma came up after several weeks of aging. It appeared to me that these aromas develop during times of low nutrients or stress. I also found that they fall off a few months after they develop.

scone 01-30-2010 06:23 PM

Ah thanks. That would make sense to me, and is consistent with yeast throwing more flavors when stressed as opposed to less. Reading the Horse of a Different Color though, I'm thinking I might try no aeration. I can't see how this would NOT stress the yeast, but the one (Brett C. only) recipe where aeration was discussed, the pineapple was subdued, and the brewer didn't aerate.

Anyone have experience with what aeration does to Brett C.?


All times are GMT. The time now is 08:27 AM.

Copyright ©2000 - 2014, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.