Spike Brewing 12.5 Conical Fermenter Giveaway - Enter Now!

Home Brew Forums > Home Brewing Beer > Lambic & Wild Brewing > Flanders red question

Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools
Old 12-01-2011, 01:29 AM   #41
smokinghole
Senior Member
HBT_LIFETIMESUPPORTER.png
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
 
smokinghole's Avatar
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Nov 2009
Location: Lucid Dream Land
Posts: 2,864
Liked 110 Times on 92 Posts
Likes Given: 10

Default

I do think the acetic acid mostly comes from brett. I came to this realization on my own (if anyone but me take my realizations for anything), when I read about a brewery souring by oxygenating brett only beers in barrels. I cannot remember the brewery name but in the presence of oxygen brett will produce acetic acid. I have not found a metabolic pathway map for brett (I haven't look real hard though), if I could find one it would explain everything. If one does not exist who knows then. A metabolic pathway map would demonstrate what is made in the presence of oxygen versus anaerobic conditions. I'm trying to figure these things out and do research but even with my university library has limited offering on Brettanomyces behavior. A large majority of academic research papers is directly related to the wine industry with the only beer references from 20yrs ago from Leuven about lambics.

When I find anything cool I'll post up and share the info.

__________________

Going through life is hard.
Going through life stupid is harder.

smokinghole is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 12-01-2011, 03:00 PM   #42
Almighty
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Jan 2009
Location: San Diego, CA
Posts: 418
Liked 22 Times on 15 Posts

Default

You should contact Chad from the Brettanomyces Project and now Crooked Stave. I remember him talking about this, but not sure where the reference is. His AHA presentation has some good info:
2011 Presentations Brewing with Brett

__________________
Almighty is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 12-26-2011, 06:54 PM   #43
calebawilson
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Mar 2010
Location: Katy, tx
Posts: 212
Liked 1 Times on 1 Posts
Likes Given: 4

Default

Another question I was going to transfer this and put more wort on the cake but haven't had a chance to brew lately and there is now a pretty gnarly Pellicle formed I brewed this Flanders red on the first of November today is December 26th is it still ok to transfer off and add wort to the cake?

__________________
calebawilson is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 12-27-2011, 10:15 PM   #44
Almighty
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Jan 2009
Location: San Diego, CA
Posts: 418
Liked 22 Times on 15 Posts

Default

Yes, that will work well. The viability of the Sacc strain may be pretty low, so you may want to add some more to help start the fermentation. I recommend using a balanced Belgian strain, but you can use whatever you currently have. It will not make a huge impact on the beer over the long aging period.

__________________
Almighty is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 12-27-2011, 11:41 PM   #45
JacobS
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Feb 2010
Location: Madison
Posts: 90
Liked 2 Times on 2 Posts
Likes Given: 1

Default

Ummmm the Sacc yeast strain will matter in the final outcome. Highly recommend the Belgian strain over a generic profile ale yeast. There is a whole post on HBT somewhere where this is discussed. Now that being said I am not saying that the beer will be bad or not turn out if you use a neutral strain just won't be as interesting.

__________________
In Primary: KSS-Fool's Folly

In Secondary:Old Croaker Imperial Stout

Long Aging: Old Bruin, Flanders Red Ale, Flanders Pale Ale, Wheat'n'Peach, TC- Aged Amber, TC-Aged Pale Wheat, pSaison Historiq, Black Bretty, Flanders Red Rye

On Tap: TC-Red Headed Stepchild, TC-Saison v4, TC-Misty Moorings,

Bottled: Thunderhead Imperial Stout, TC-Three Weissmen

http://brewtoadchateau.blogspot.com
JacobS is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 12-27-2011, 11:57 PM   #46
passedpawn
Waste Allocation Load Lifter - Earth Class
HBT_MODERATOR.png
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
 
passedpawn's Avatar
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Apr 2009
Location: ☼ Clearwater, FL ☼
Posts: 18,609
Liked 3189 Times on 1992 Posts
Likes Given: 2720

Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by JacobS View Post
Ummmm the Sacc yeast strain will matter in the final outcome. Highly recommend the Belgian strain over a generic profile ale yeast. There is a whole post on HBT somewhere where this is discussed. Now that being said I am not saying that the beer will be bad or not turn out if you use a neutral strain just won't be as interesting.
I seriously can't imagine the sacc strain having any impact on a Flanders red. Not mine, anyway. There are 2 brett strains in the Roeselare blend, so that's all that I needed.
__________________
What Would Vermeer Paint?
passedpawn is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 12-28-2011, 03:16 PM   #47
Almighty
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Jan 2009
Location: San Diego, CA
Posts: 418
Liked 22 Times on 15 Posts

Default

I also think the Sacc strain will make a difference, but I don't think it is that significant. Has anyone actually done a side by side comparison? My only reference is from year to year batches. I preferred my batches with a Belgian strain, but the final flavor could have been influenced by other factors.

__________________
Almighty is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 12-28-2011, 03:29 PM   #48
calebawilson
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Mar 2010
Location: Katy, tx
Posts: 212
Liked 1 Times on 1 Posts
Likes Given: 4

Default

Well I'm going to repitch the slurry so the Brett strains are going to be built up so I might add some wlp550 that will have from a belgain pale that's about finished.

__________________
calebawilson is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 12-28-2011, 07:49 PM   #49
JacobS
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Feb 2010
Location: Madison
Posts: 90
Liked 2 Times on 2 Posts
Likes Given: 1

Default

@Almighty,

I'd be up for doing a side by side if you or anyone else is. Say we both brew two batches one with neutral yeast, one with Belgian yeast, then add an agreed upon souring blend, trade examples after 1yrish?

__________________
In Primary: KSS-Fool's Folly

In Secondary:Old Croaker Imperial Stout

Long Aging: Old Bruin, Flanders Red Ale, Flanders Pale Ale, Wheat'n'Peach, TC- Aged Amber, TC-Aged Pale Wheat, pSaison Historiq, Black Bretty, Flanders Red Rye

On Tap: TC-Red Headed Stepchild, TC-Saison v4, TC-Misty Moorings,

Bottled: Thunderhead Imperial Stout, TC-Three Weissmen

http://brewtoadchateau.blogspot.com
JacobS is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 12-28-2011, 08:02 PM   #50
ReverseApacheMaster
Registered User
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Jul 2009
Location: Keller, Texas
Posts: 4,887
Liked 229 Times on 192 Posts

Default

The reason why the Belgian strains are preferred is for the sacc strain's ester production. Brett will take those esters and do interesting things with them, available acids and alcohol. It will make a more complex beer. It's my experience that the esters result in a more prominent brett flavor.

__________________
ReverseApacheMaster is offline
JacobS Likes This 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Reply


Quick Reply
Message:
Options
Thread Tools