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Old 01-02-2010, 11:50 PM   #11
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Any reason you chose to do a separate lacto fermentation as opposed to a sour mash?

Do you have to make any adjustments for boiling 1/3 of the volume with hops and the remaining volume without?

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Old 01-05-2010, 12:43 AM   #12
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Any reason you chose to do a separate lacto fermentation as opposed to a sour mash?
I think I answered this just before. Went with pure culture instead of dealing with mixed bugs. I've done sour mashes before with success; just wanted to be sure on this one that I didn't get some other bug in there.


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Do you have to make any adjustments for boiling 1/3 of the volume with hops and the remaining volume without?
I just over-hopped the small boil. I ran out of time to do the bitterness calculation, so I just doubled it.
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Old 01-08-2010, 04:32 AM   #13
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On my all Brett L beer, The Muse, I got 88% attenuation. It took a few weeks at 75f to get there and it had some slowness and restarts.
Brett really seems to like warmer temps, I wonder if Brett can even produce fusel alcohols at all. I had one of my all brett beers at 85f and it tasted fantastic.

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Old 01-08-2010, 06:16 PM   #14
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Great thread. I want to try exactly this method with half of a Flanders Red batch, culturing my own lacto from yogurt which should be a more pure culture than grain. The other half of the Red is going on a Roeselare cake. I expect it to be more like Jolly Pumpkin La Roja than a Flanders Red, but that's fine because the goal is something I can drink in 2-3 months rather than waiting 12-18 for the Flanders to be finished and ready for blending.

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Old 01-13-2010, 07:02 PM   #15
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This is so cool! I'm reading Wildbrews right now and I am fascinated with Belgian/wild fermentation. This is a very cool idea!

When you reheat the wort that has lacto in it, does it denature the alcohol as well or around what temp kills the lacto, but not the alcohol? I am thinking I want to do something similar soon.

Are you doing a full 5 gallons? Do you intend on aging any in oak?

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Old 01-13-2010, 10:34 PM   #16
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When you reheat the wort that has lacto in it, does it denature the alcohol as well or around what temp kills the lacto, but not the alcohol?
There is no alcohol, only lactic acid.

I've seen confusion about this before (on one of the Berliner Weiss threads) where people think you can make alcohol using Lactobacillus. Remember, it's a bacteria, not a yeast.

Read the section of Wild Brews where he talks about Lactobacillus. That chapter was influential for me because I learned what each specific organism did. People lump together "bugs" and don't fully understand what each one does.
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Old 01-13-2010, 10:59 PM   #17
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AH! That makes sense actually. One reason blending was popular I'd imagine. I've only gotten a few chapters in so it hasn't touched on what each component does and how it works. I can't wait to get through this book. I really want to try this out, too bad it takes like 3 years to get something decent. Although I think I'll brew one for SWMBO's 35th!!

How long did you sour with lacto?

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Old 01-14-2010, 03:38 AM   #18
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As you peruse this thread, please note that I've made several updates to the OP. Some questions have been answered there instead of in the thread itself.

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Old 01-14-2010, 03:41 AM   #19
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I really want to try this out, too bad it takes like 3 years to get something decent.
Satisfactory-to-good results can be had in 8-12 months.


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How long did you sour with lacto?
I believe this is answered in OP.
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Old 01-14-2010, 06:33 AM   #20
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I recently did a small sour mash using two row. I checked the gravity after about 4 hours and it was 1.120. over the next 4 days I boiled some water and topped it off to keep the temps up a bit. I pulled about 1.5 gallons from the mash tun at 1.077 which I transferred to a primary bucket for 4 days. This morning I decided to bring this wort to a boil to kill off the lacto and other stuff in there as it was quite sour (smell/taste were decent and interesting). Checking the gravity after cooling it down I got 1.021. I couldn't taste any alcohol so I don't think it was wild yeast in there. I didn't think the bugs from a sour mash would take it down so quickly? can anyone tell me what might have happened and what I should do to fix this beer? sorry if I'm hijacking the thread but I think it's relevant.

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