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Old 08-14-2011, 07:33 PM   #1
seraphorist
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Default expedited sour beer... with possible problems.

i have been a home brewer for a couple of years and have yet to brew a straight forward simple brew. i figure if i wanted that i would just buy it from the store. i am super into experimental brewing just to see what happens mainly. that being said here is something i tried and some questions about it.

ten days ago i decided to see if i could make a sour beer in the time it takes to make a normal beer. my process was to steep my grain then just turn off the burner. i let that sit open on the stove (room temp) for three days before i brought it back up to a boil and finished it out like you would any other beer. my (extract) recipe was:

2 lb acidulated malt (to start out sour)
1/2 lb buiscut
1/4 lb munich dark
1/8 lb cara aroma
3 lb Pilsen lt. DME
2 lb org white sugar (to make it a bit drier)
2oz bramling cross hop (roasted a bit)
1 irish moss tablet
whitelabs sake yeast (because it sounded fun)

it got good and frothy in that three day period of open wild fermentation. my boil was 60 minutes, which i feel was long enough to kill off any of that crap that got in it, but the sourness would remain. i don't know i just make stuff up, but it usually works out for the best. now, today, i just transferred it into secondary and it is wonderfully sour tasting, but on top of that it smells like the stinkiest dumpster in the summer time. i really hope that that subsides over time, from other forums i have read it seems like a possibility. what do you all think? this could be a great new process with some practice and tweaking. also, it is the cloudiest beer i have ever seen.

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Old 08-14-2011, 07:35 PM   #2
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This sounds so scary to me...

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Old 08-14-2011, 10:10 PM   #3
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So the wort sat for 3 days exposed to oxygen? I hate to say it, but I don't think the smell is going away.

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Old 08-15-2011, 12:08 AM   #4
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I imagine letting wort sit like that left it subject to whatever floated in, rather than being innoculated by a source like grain in the case of a sour mash. Being in your kitchen it probably got a lot of exposure to mold spores, e coli and other nasty stuff typically found in houses. I would not expect the nasty smell to go away but it might.

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Old 08-15-2011, 01:14 PM   #5
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So the wort sat for 3 days exposed to oxygen? I hate to say it, but I don't think the smell is going away.
i was under the impression oxidization was only a problem after you pitched your yeast, or is this a special circumstance where technically there were two times where yeast was pitched?
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Old 08-15-2011, 01:54 PM   #6
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The problem is that the wort not being boiled had some bacteria in it from the grain and mash. Some of the bacteria that are aerobic will make some seriously putrid smelling byproducts when they are allowed to grow an uncontrolled environment. Sure you killed all the potentially pathogenic crap in the wort by boiling but all their disgusting byproducts are left behind. I bet you gots a bunch of butyric acid in there.

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Old 08-15-2011, 03:11 PM   #7
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This sounds so scary to me...
+4 to this. I'm shaking in my boots. Got any pics of the krausen?
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Old 08-15-2011, 03:12 PM   #8
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I made a sour mash that I let sit for 3 days in my mash tun/cooler @ as close to 120* as I could keep it (I just threw in a hand full of two row to innoculate). It turned out great. Not a very complex sour, but good for such short time. However I laid plastic wrap on top of it to make sure no air could get at it. Id suggest retrying and using some plastic wrap or something similar to make sure no o2 gets in.

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Old 08-15-2011, 03:15 PM   #9
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You could always try something like this for a more controlled, quick souring: http://www.brewboard.com/index.php?showtopic=29637&hl=impatient

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Old 08-15-2011, 03:31 PM   #10
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i was under the impression oxidization was only a problem after you pitched your yeast, or is this a special circumstance where technically there were two times where yeast was pitched?
It's the other microbes that you need to be worried about, not oxidization. During that time all kinds of stinky/nasty bugs could have made it in there. Many of these love oxygen.
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