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Old 10-04-2012, 09:07 PM   #161
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I then racked to secondary and added 8 oz starters of both brett L and Brett B as well as my 1 ounce of oak chips that had been soaking in 12 ounces of Cab for a month (the cab went in too). I did this on the logic that russian river cold crashes and then centrifuges consecration to get all the Sacch out of the beer, and then adds in the brett giving it a couple of weeks to get started before they add the bacteria.
Thanks for sharing your process. I haven't decided what I'm going to do yet. The high mash temperature (159) leads me to believe that the terminal gravity for Saccharomyces will be fairly high, in which case I might just chuck the Brett in on top of it. On the other hand, if I hit 1.016, and it's still chugging along, I might cold crash it and rack as you suggest.
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Old 10-04-2012, 11:50 PM   #162
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My intention was to get as much of the Sacch out as possible, and then add in the brett in the hopes of more or less killing off any Sacc left. I did this becuase I was worried that otherwise the Sacc would just go to sleep for a bit and then wake up as soon as I added the currants. of course I wanted the sugar in the currants to be eaten by the bugs and the brett. I also figured my way was a closer approximation to what RR does.

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Old 10-05-2012, 03:41 PM   #163
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If you add the oak chips on day 1 of secondary then aren't you risking over-oaking it, or do you rack it off the oak at some point?

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Old 10-06-2012, 04:01 PM   #164
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Its 4 months old at the moment and and I can't taste any oak at all. (I taste any time I take a gravity reading).

I used 1 ounce of french oak chips, boiled in water for 10 minutes, drained, and then soaked in Cab Sav for 2 weeks.

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Old 10-06-2012, 09:17 PM   #165
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Folks, I just brewed this one up today. I may have been over zealous in my yeast purchasing, but I bought both the Brett and the Roselare. As I read the instructions, it looks like fermentation is with the Abbey for the first 2 to 3 days, then racked into a secondary with the Brett and the currants for another fermentation for another few months, then racked again into a tertiary for the Roselare and the oak chips. Is my process all out of whack?

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Old 10-07-2012, 04:57 PM   #166
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Folks, I just brewed this one up today. I may have been over zealous in my yeast purchasing, but I bought both the Brett and the Roselare. As I read the instructions, it looks like fermentation is with the Abbey for the first 2 to 3 days, then racked into a secondary with the Brett and the currants for another fermentation for another few months, then racked again into a tertiary for the Roselare and the oak chips. Is my process all out of whack?
THe instructions mention brett, but after re-reading I understood the Roeselare took the brett's place by adding the mix of "bugs". I made sort of an unconventional starter with the currants, a quart of starter wort, and the Roeselare and would like to have racked the ale onto it a bit sooner. With a two quart starter of Abbey Ale II, at 72°F fermenter temp, I went to 1.010 in less than 3 days. My curant starter was cooking off pretty good the next morning before work (day 3+), and that's when I racked it onto the currant mixture. I think if you wait until late in the process with the Roeselare you'll miss out on the extra stuff besides brett it has to offer since the original brett will have most everything cleaned up.
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Old 10-08-2012, 11:29 AM   #167
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how long on the bugs till the sacc should die? i pitched about 10mL of roeselaire from a wyeast pack aug 16 (the rest went into a kriek) and after about a month got the big, funky bubbles and some airlock activity (brett?). that's all settled and there's mostly just thin white scum at the surface.

i'd like to avoid feeding yeast but i don't know much about their viability in this environment.

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Old 10-09-2012, 06:31 AM   #168
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In MoreBeer's interview with Vinnie, he talks about pitching just Brett and giving it 6-10 weeks on its own before pitching the bugs to make sure it does its thing before being knocked out by the low pH from the bugs. This is why they recommend pitching Roesalare after the Brett ferments on its own for a while. It's confusing because the instructions that come with the kit don't mention this, but it is discussed on the website and follows more closely with how the real Consecration is made:

Vinnie recommends fermenting down to around a 1.016-1.018 with Abbey Ale yeast. He recommends the temperature to be 72°F during the first few days of fermentation, and then lets it free rise to 76°F until the target gravity of 1.016 is reached.

After hitting this target gravity, he'll transfer to barrels to start the aging and souring process (a secondary fermenter will be necessary - a barrel would be preferred!) Currants and Brettanomyces are added at this point.

After approximately 7-8 weeks, you'll want to add your Lactobacillus and Pediococcus. To kill two birds with one stone, we recommend pitching Roeselare (WY3763) which contains both bacterium.

The souring process can take anywhere from four to twelve months. Once the desired sourness level is achieved, you'll want to add the Consecration barrel oak chunk(s) until desired oak character is achieved.

Vinnie uses Belgian bottles when bottling Consecration, and bottle conditions using wine yeast. He mentions that he'll never bottle if the gravity is over 1.008.


My primary took 2 weeks to get down to 1.018, and pretty much settled out there using WL530 (Abbey Ale). Following Vinnie's method, I then pitched pure Brett and the currants, waited 2 months, and just pitched Roeselare last week (air lock was still bubbling a bit from the Brett). SG after 2 months of Brett fermentation was 1.012. Only 4-12 months to go!

I'm also bottling a sample at each intermediate step (before pitching Brett, before pitching bugs, and before oak) to compare with the final product. Should be interesting!

-Carl

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Old 10-10-2012, 02:51 AM   #169
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In MoreBeer's interview with Vinnie, he talks about pitching just Brett and giving it 6-10 weeks on its own before pitching the bugs to make sure it does its thing before being knocked out by the low pH from the bugs. This is why they recommend pitching Roesalare after the Brett ferments on its own for a while. It's confusing because the instructions that come with the kit don't mention this, but it is discussed on the website and follows more closely with how the real Consecration is made:

Vinnie recommends fermenting down to around a 1.016-1.018 with Abbey Ale yeast. He recommends the temperature to be 72°F during the first few days of fermentation, and then lets it free rise to 76°F until the target gravity of 1.016 is reached.

After hitting this target gravity, he'll transfer to barrels to start the aging and souring process (a secondary fermenter will be necessary - a barrel would be preferred!) Currants and Brettanomyces are added at this point.

After approximately 7-8 weeks, you'll want to add your Lactobacillus and Pediococcus. To kill two birds with one stone, we recommend pitching Roeselare (WY3763) which contains both bacterium.

The souring process can take anywhere from four to twelve months. Once the desired sourness level is achieved, you'll want to add the Consecration barrel oak chunk(s) until desired oak character is achieved.

Vinnie uses Belgian bottles when bottling Consecration, and bottle conditions using wine yeast. He mentions that he'll never bottle if the gravity is over 1.008.


My primary took 2 weeks to get down to 1.018, and pretty much settled out there using WL530 (Abbey Ale). Following Vinnie's method, I then pitched pure Brett and the currants, waited 2 months, and just pitched Roeselare last week (air lock was still bubbling a bit from the Brett). SG after 2 months of Brett fermentation was 1.012. Only 4-12 months to go!

I'm also bottling a sample at each intermediate step (before pitching Brett, before pitching bugs, and before oak) to compare with the final product. Should be interesting!

-Carl
Carl, thanks for the reply. I guess we'll keep our fingers crossed.

My abbey is bubbling its way down to the requisite gravity, I hope. Did you make a starter for the brett / currants?
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Old 10-10-2012, 06:15 AM   #170
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I didn't make a starter for the Brett, just pitched the White Labs vial. Even with no starter, I had an active bubbling air lock the very next day, which persisted for the next 2 months.

The currants were added directly from their packaging to the bottom of the secondary fermenter, and then racked on top of them. They floated to the top by the next morning.

-Carl

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