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Old 11-30-2012, 03:40 AM   #1
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Default Chocolate covered BEAVR Nutz sour?

I was thinking of brewing this kit, but also adding WY5526 to the brew.
http://www.midwestsupplies.com/choco...grain-kit.html

This will be my first sour brew and I wanted to ask a few questions before starting.
Will I add this yeast a few days after or with the other yeast?
The original directions say to add peanut butter powder and coco powder 7 days before bottling and coco nibs 3 days before, should I do this at the end as the directions say or would this be better in the beginning and then left to age?

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Old 12-03-2012, 04:37 PM   #2
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Honestly a funky/sour peanut butter and chocolate beer seems like an odd choice, especially for your first attempt. How about a relatively simple beer in the pale to brown range?

Brett lambicus will not produce much acidity. Brett provides complex aromatics in the forms of fruity esters and funky phenolics. It is really the lactic acid bacteria (Lactobacillus and Pediococcus) that produce the lactic acid sour beers are known for. Something like the Roeselare blend has all the microbes you need. Although I tend to pitch some brewer's yeast and bottled dregs from unpasteurized sour beers as well.

I tend to leave "extra" flavors out of my sour beers until they are almost done. That way you can decide if you think the beer would benefit from fruit, dry hops, spices, blending etc.

Hope that helps, best of luck!

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Old 12-04-2012, 07:52 PM   #3
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I like really weird stuff, but... Man this sounds pretty out there. If you have the carboy space, time, and money, knock yourself out. Like OldSock said, B. lambicus won't make it sour. Though, with some aging it develops a "pie cherry" character, so if your goal is to make a Chocolate Peanut butter and Jelly beer - you might be on to something. Maybe.

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Old 12-05-2012, 01:22 PM   #4
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Oldsock View Post
Honestly a funky/sour peanut butter and chocolate beer seems like an odd choice, especially for your first attempt. How about a relatively simple beer in the pale to brown range?

Brett lambicus will not produce much acidity. Brett provides complex aromatics in the forms of fruity esters and funky phenolics. It is really the lactic acid bacteria (Lactobacillus and Pediococcus) that produce the lactic acid sour beers are known for. Something like the Roeselare blend has all the microbes you need. Although I tend to pitch some brewer's yeast and bottled dregs from unpasteurized sour beers as well.

I tend to leave "extra" flavors out of my sour beers until they are almost done. That way you can decide if you think the beer would benefit from fruit, dry hops, spices, blending etc.

Hope that helps, best of luck!
Thanks for the input and help its why I asked, If I'm going to invest possibly years in to something I don't want to mess it all up.

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Originally Posted by Weizenstein View Post
I like really weird stuff, but... Man this sounds pretty out there. If you have the carboy space, time, and money, knock yourself out. Like OldSock said, B. lambicus won't make it sour. Though, with some aging it develops a "pie cherry" character, so if your goal is to make a Chocolate Peanut butter and Jelly beer - you might be on to something. Maybe.
That is kind of the direction I was hoping for. Was thinking of pulling only a gallon for this test.
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