The Great Bottle Opener Giveaway

Home Brew Forums > Home Brewing Beer > Lambic & Wild Brewing > Bunk Lacto?

Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools
Old 03-27-2013, 03:07 AM   #11
Wahoo
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Feb 2010
Location: Fairfield, CT
Posts: 42
Liked 1 Times on 1 Posts
Likes Given: 1

Default

Awesome!

__________________
Wahoo is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 03-27-2013, 03:10 AM   #12
ardyexfor
Feedback Score: 10 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Apr 2010
Location: Redmond, Oregon
Posts: 455
Liked 63 Times on 50 Posts
Likes Given: 27

Default

Still trying to figure out what it is and if I should pitch it or not... Was planning to brew a Berliner Weisse this weekend, but not sure what exactly I have cultured.

__________________
ardyexfor is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 03-27-2013, 03:22 PM   #13
nofootbreak
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Jul 2011
Location: ft collins, co
Posts: 138
Liked 9 Times on 7 Posts
Likes Given: 1

Default

I think using the grain will culture more than lacto in there, and you may get some bad results, or require a longer aging. My lacto starter ended up taking off after almost 5 days. If you dont mind waiting to see how it develops it may be worth a shot. I just think theres got to be more than lacto in that grain starter.

Were these starters at room temp?

__________________
nofootbreak is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 03-27-2013, 09:22 PM   #14
ardyexfor
Feedback Score: 10 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Apr 2010
Location: Redmond, Oregon
Posts: 455
Liked 63 Times on 50 Posts
Likes Given: 27

Default

Temperature has fluctuated between 90-110 degrees.

I am starting to think that something else just got into this specific starter. The second one I made with the other half of the grain starter has not changed much, just the thin film and small clumps of white here and there.

I believe the apple juice starter has some wild yeast in it. You can see bits of movement throughout the liquid like a yeast fermentation. It also looks like the secondary pellicle is more so the krausen breaking through the pellicle, which is why it looks so gnarly.

I am hesitant to pitch either of these into my BW now... Need advice on this one...

__________________
ardyexfor is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 04-04-2013, 03:11 AM   #15
rexbanner
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Nov 2008
Location: DC
Posts: 1,372
Liked 94 Times on 67 Posts
Likes Given: 91

Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by ardyexfor View Post
Temperature has fluctuated between 90-110 degrees.

I am starting to think that something else just got into this specific starter. The second one I made with the other half of the grain starter has not changed much, just the thin film and small clumps of white here and there.

I believe the apple juice starter has some wild yeast in it. You can see bits of movement throughout the liquid like a yeast fermentation. It also looks like the secondary pellicle is more so the krausen breaking through the pellicle, which is why it looks so gnarly.

I am hesitant to pitch either of these into my BW now... Need advice on this one...
Lacto that produces CO2, as some strains do, looks like sacc fermenting. It really just looks like sacc, period. Why don't you taste it? If it's sour, mission accomplished.
__________________

Peep my nanobrewery: http://crookedrunbrewing.com

On tap at the brewery:
Logan's Song English pale
Hopsail Belgian single
Hellfire Black IPA
Summer Night raspberry dark saison

Crooked Run Brewing: Traditional ales, local ingredients

rexbanner is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 04-04-2013, 03:23 AM   #16
ardyexfor
Feedback Score: 10 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Apr 2010
Location: Redmond, Oregon
Posts: 455
Liked 63 Times on 50 Posts
Likes Given: 27

Default

Yes, actually I figured this out kinda by doing just that. It tasted sour and clean no off flavors or anything so I went ahead and pitched both lacto starters. 48 Hrs later and it had attenuated from 1.032 down to 1.010. Still trying to figure that out, still just tastes tart and clean. Tastes Berliner Weissyish.

I made another post asking about the attenuation and what I should do now...

__________________
ardyexfor is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 04-04-2013, 01:38 PM   #17
smokinghole
Senior Member
HBT_LIFETIMESUPPORTER.png
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
 
smokinghole's Avatar
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Nov 2009
Location: Lucid Dream Land
Posts: 2,823
Liked 107 Times on 89 Posts
Likes Given: 10

Default

If you got that kind of attenuation then I would wager the is a yeast in the mix. Now some lacto can make alcohol along with lactic acid. I believe thats heterofermentive and I think the yeast suppliers are supposed to be selling homofermentative strains. Lactic acid is more dense than water so I don't think you made a ton of acid. Also don't take my word. I am posting from a bad memory through a phone, so i cant double check my bad memory.

__________________

Going through life is hard.
Going through life stupid is harder.

smokinghole is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 04-06-2013, 12:56 AM   #18
Calder
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Mar 2010
Location: Ohio
Posts: 5,398
Liked 236 Times on 211 Posts
Likes Given: 2

Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by smokinghole View Post
If you got that kind of attenuation then I would wager the is a yeast in the mix. Now some lacto can make alcohol along with lactic acid. I believe thats heterofermentive and I think the yeast suppliers are supposed to be selling homofermentative strains. Lactic acid is more dense than water so I don't think you made a ton of acid. Also don't take my word. I am posting from a bad memory through a phone, so i cant double check my bad memory.
Correct it is Heterofermentive. Homofermentive just makes 2 molecules of Lactoc acid with no CO2 from each sugar cell (or something like that).

Heterofermentive produce CO2 as well as acid. I'm not sure it makes alcohol though. Maybe someone who knows can chime in.
__________________
Calder is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 04-06-2013, 03:37 AM   #19
nofootbreak
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Jul 2011
Location: ft collins, co
Posts: 138
Liked 9 Times on 7 Posts
Likes Given: 1

Default

The BW I just made with wyeast lacto is at day 5 of 100% lacto fermentation and the gravity has dropped to 1.008. Its just mildly tart, and not where I want it yet, but the gravity I am surprised by the gravity reading. I have a hard time believing my sanitation wasn't good enough, and i filled the carboy up to the point where there was probably around .25 gallon of headspace, and the carboy was purged with co2 when i pushed the star san out with co2, and again after I drained the wort into the carboy.

Perhaps my sanitation wasnt good enough, but i have a hard time believing that some airborne yeast could have began fermenting less than 48 hours after pitching the lacto. This is all a mystery to me.

__________________
nofootbreak is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 04-06-2013, 01:48 PM   #20
Calder
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Mar 2010
Location: Ohio
Posts: 5,398
Liked 236 Times on 211 Posts
Likes Given: 2

Default

I found this on some microbiology site:

"Lactic acid bacteria can be divided into two groups based upon the products produced from the fermentation of glucose. Homofermentative organisms ferment glucose to two moles of lactic acid, generating a net of 2 ATP per mole of glucose metabolized. Lactic acid is the major product of this fermentation. Heterofermentative lactic acid bacteria ferment 1 mole of glucose to 1 mole of lactic acid, 1 mole of ethanol, and 1 mole of CO2. One mole of ATP is generated per mole of glucose, resulting in less growth per mole of glucose metabolized. Because of the low energy yields, lactic acid bacteria often grow more slowly than microbes capable of respiration, and produce smaller colonies of 2-3 mm."

So I guess you have alcohol.

__________________
Calder is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Reply


Quick Reply
Message:
Options
Thread Tools


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Do I have lacto? bleme Beginners Beer Brewing Forum 3 05-01-2012 06:15 PM
Is it Lacto? NyPDFustercluck Beginners Beer Brewing Forum 0 08-08-2011 01:20 AM
Lacto and Co2 centralpabrewer Lambic & Wild Brewing 3 06-10-2010 02:08 PM
Using Lacto msheraw Recipes/Ingredients 1 08-04-2009 04:30 PM
Beauty or bunk? Let's put the new Sam Adams glass to task... Dude General Beer Discussion 68 10-25-2007 06:39 PM