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Old 03-09-2011, 02:24 PM   #1
coldrice
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Default Bruxellensis v Lambicus?

Astonishing how little discussion there is regarding the differences in the three common strains of brett. A guy started a thread a little while ago and it ended up going off in a different direction, so here it is again, especially regarding Brett B and Brett L. Some say one is horsey-er and some say the other is milder and vice versa. Odd, also, that the Wyeast website and the White Labs website contradict each other. I intend to do a blend with Brett C and either 'b' or 'l' but I can't decide which. Any thoughts?

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Old 03-09-2011, 03:00 PM   #2
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I haven't used Brett B yet. I associate this with English Style Old Ale. I just haven't made one.

I have used Brett L from Wyeast for a Stong Oud Bruin (SOB) OG 1.081 - FG 1.006. This definitely has a pineapple, cherry pie aroma. There is some earthy barnyard there too but not overpowering. I did not pitch lacto or pedio.

I am sure someone will contradict me, but this was my experience.

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Old 03-09-2011, 03:06 PM   #3
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You can get different flavors/aromas out of both depending on the temperature. The Brewing Network archives have some great info on both strains from Vinnie at RR. Check out the 1/17/10 show.

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Old 03-09-2011, 03:14 PM   #4
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Here is what I wrote about their flavor characteristics for the book I'm slowly working on:

WY5112 Brettanomyces bruxellensis – Provides the classic Brett character made famous by Orval. Descriptors range through farmyard, wet hay, horse blanket etc…

WY5526 Brettanomyces lambicus – Big cherry pie character when young, but it fades as the beer ages. It seems to produce more tartness than the other Brett strains.

WLP650 Brettanomyces bruxellensis –Similar to the WYeast Brett bruxellensis, but with even more aggressive farmyard funk aromatics.

WLP653 Brettanomyces lambicus – This strain has a much more aggressive and funky character than its WYeast equivalent, lacking the cherry pie character that is usually cited with this strain.

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Old 03-10-2011, 12:25 AM   #5
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Oldsock View Post
WLP650 Brettanomyces bruxellensis –Similar to the WYeast Brett bruxellensis, but with even more aggressive farmyard funk aromatics.
I've used WLP650 a lot recently (all from the same vial) and I get nothing but a lot of fruity flavors. No barnyard in there at all.

I also cultivated the dregs from Ommegang Biere De Mars (I think it's supposed to be Brett-B too), and that was over-the-top barnyard. The starter I made smelt and tasted like a pig-sty; really over-powering. Have not tasted any of the product yet.
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Old 03-10-2011, 03:57 AM   #6
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Brett seems to produce differing flavor profiles dependent on many factors. I have a Orval spiked Saison that went a very different direction than the bottle I got the brett from. Also, I have noted adding brett in bottles for conditioning can have a dramatic affect over primary and secondary additions.

Here is a good read. Old Sock had some input on this power point, which is a great tool for the cliff note version of bretts.
http://www.ahaconference.org/wp-cont...ettBrewing.pdf

Hope that helps,

BW

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Old 03-10-2011, 12:27 PM   #7
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Quote:
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I've used WLP650 a lot recently (all from the same vial) and I get nothing but a lot of fruity flavors. No barnyard in there at all.
How long have you been aging the beer for? I got a lot of fruit using it as a 100% fermentation, but in both primary/secondary I got a good deal of funk/leather (although much more in primary with Sacch).
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Old 03-10-2011, 05:42 PM   #8
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Oldsock View Post
Here is what I wrote about their flavor characteristics for the book I'm slowly working on:

WY5112 Brettanomyces bruxellensis – Provides the classic Brett character made famous by Orval. Descriptors range through farmyard, wet hay, horse blanket etc…

WY5526 Brettanomyces lambicus – Big cherry pie character when young, but it fades as the beer ages. It seems to produce more tartness than the other Brett strains.

WLP650 Brettanomyces bruxellensis –Similar to the WYeast Brett bruxellensis, but with even more aggressive farmyard funk aromatics.

WLP653 Brettanomyces lambicus – This strain has a much more aggressive and funky character than its WYeast equivalent, lacking the cherry pie character that is usually cited with this strain.
Any info like this for claussenii
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Old 03-10-2011, 06:14 PM   #9
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Anectdotally, I pitched brett C into an old ale that used S-04 for primary, and it's become extremely port-like. Lots of cherry and grape.

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Old 03-10-2011, 06:20 PM   #10
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I've had good luck with White lab's Brett C, in big beers it gives a nice leather flavor, bit of cherry not too funky. In lighter beers it tends to be fruitier.

Haven't tried Wyeast's version.

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