Ss Brewing Technologies Giveaway!

Home Brew Forums > Home Brewing Beer > Lambic & Wild Brewing > brilliant easy wild yeast capture
Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools
Old 09-01-2011, 01:04 AM   #1
greyhoundbrewing
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Sep 2010
Location: midland park, nj
Posts: 157
Liked 5 Times on 5 Posts
Likes Given: 1

Default brilliant easy wild yeast capture

so i have this buddy who, in my opinion, had a brilliant idea. he made this batch but instead of using a conventional yeast or capturing his own he threw in some unused grain. the idea was to let the yeast that are on the unused grain to ferment the batch. he told me it resulted in a crazy krausen. im very excited to use this technique. what is everyones opinion??


GH

__________________
greyhoundbrewing is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 09-01-2011, 01:43 AM   #2
Nateo
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Jul 2010
Location: Bennett Springs, MO
Posts: 2,055
Liked 37 Times on 29 Posts
Likes Given: 35

Default

I've done that to grow lacto bacteria. There is a fair amount of "other" stuff on the grain besides yeast. If you want to brew something sour and funky, go for it, but it's not likely you'll brew anything close to "neutral" that way.

__________________

To paraphrase Dr. England - "Off-flavors smooth with time. So do mountains. Brew it right from the start!"

My blogsite: http://nateobrew.blogspot.com/

Nateo is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 09-01-2011, 01:38 PM   #3
greyhoundbrewing
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Sep 2010
Location: midland park, nj
Posts: 157
Liked 5 Times on 5 Posts
Likes Given: 1

Default

No the idea was something funky. I love funky

__________________
greyhoundbrewing is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 09-01-2011, 05:48 PM   #4
tasq
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Mar 2010
Location: Denver, Colorado
Posts: 582
Liked 12 Times on 12 Posts
Likes Given: 11

Default

You do know that beers like this will need to sit for a minimum of 6 months, correct?

__________________
The Keg Ran Out Club
Broomfield, Colorado
http://www.kroc.org/
tasq is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 09-01-2011, 06:09 PM   #5
weirdboy
HBT_LIFETIMESUPPORTER.png
Feedback Score: 4 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: May 2009
Location: Los Angeles
Posts: 7,965
Liked 429 Times on 350 Posts
Likes Given: 60

Default

This is the lambic and wild brewing forum. I am pretty sure everyone here understands that sours take a while to develop.

__________________
weirdboy is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 09-01-2011, 06:29 PM   #6
tasq
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Mar 2010
Location: Denver, Colorado
Posts: 582
Liked 12 Times on 12 Posts
Likes Given: 11

Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by weirdboy View Post
This is the lambic and wild brewing forum. I am pretty sure everyone here understands that sours take a while to develop.
I've ran across folks who have not. Just trying to steer him clear of bottle bombs. No need to be rude.
__________________
The Keg Ran Out Club
Broomfield, Colorado
http://www.kroc.org/
tasq is offline
2
People Like This 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 09-01-2011, 06:35 PM   #7
wonderbread23
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Apr 2009
Location: Brooklyn
Posts: 1,031
Liked 36 Times on 34 Posts
Likes Given: 1

Default

You're in for a crap shoot. It is very hard to control this type if fermentation. It is best left for sour mashes where you are pre-souring the wort using the inherent lacto on the grain. You'll typically want to control the temperature to encourage certain micro-flora, and purge the volume of o2 ---- also to encourage friendly micro-flora. Left to its own devices, you'll likely end up with something tasting like vinegary baby diapers rather than a quafable beer. Have you ever accidentally left spent grain sitting around for a couple days?

__________________
wonderbread23 is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 09-01-2011, 08:26 PM   #8
Nateo
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Jul 2010
Location: Bennett Springs, MO
Posts: 2,055
Liked 37 Times on 29 Posts
Likes Given: 35

Default

I've had some VERY boring commercial lambics. Nothing funky or wild about them, really.

I agree with wonderbread. There's a chance you'll make something better than you would with commercial yeast, but there's a better chance you'll make something pretty nasty.

From my own wild yeast experiments, I haven't been impressed with the flavor from wild yeast. The average Belgian or British yeast has a lot more character than any of the wild yeasts I've captured.

__________________

To paraphrase Dr. England - "Off-flavors smooth with time. So do mountains. Brew it right from the start!"

My blogsite: http://nateobrew.blogspot.com/

Nateo is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 09-01-2011, 11:04 PM   #9
greyhoundbrewing
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Sep 2010
Location: midland park, nj
Posts: 157
Liked 5 Times on 5 Posts
Likes Given: 1

Default

i do love sours. i have made quite a few. what i am looking for is a wild yeast without the "leaving wort outside with cheese cloth covering it." i thought this would be great alternative. its just another way of contracting the use of a wild type of yeast being summer. has anyone else tried this method and what results have you had? this could be another way of developing a house strain of yeast with souring bacteria. perhaps a truly wild brew.

__________________
greyhoundbrewing is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 09-03-2011, 03:00 PM   #10
COLObrewer
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Jan 2009
Location: Pea Green, Colorado
Posts: 2,937
Liked 56 Times on 50 Posts
Likes Given: 4

Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by greyhoundbrewing View Post
so i have this buddy who, in my opinion, had a brilliant idea. he made this batch but instead of using a conventional yeast or capturing his own he threw in some unused grain. the idea was to let the yeast that are on the unused grain to ferment the batch. he told me it resulted in a crazy krausen. im very excited to use this technique. what is everyones opinion??
GH
Tried this last month, didn't get any good comments, "Always came out tasting like puke.. . . . I was never able to salvage a beer from something like this". I ain't sceerd, I haven't tasted it yet but here's a pic:

__________________
__________________

Newer, better, more streamlined sig as per the forum police.

COLObrewer is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Reply



Quick Reply
Message:
Options
Thread Tools


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Howto: Capture Wild Yeast ericd Lambic & Wild Brewing 946 07-07-2014 09:09 PM
Wild yeast from "wild" grapes DrJerryrigger Lambic & Wild Brewing 11 10-15-2011 12:52 AM
First Attempt to Capture Wild Yeasties! jwarren Lambic & Wild Brewing 2 02-08-2011 05:12 AM
wild yeast zackmon21 Lambic & Wild Brewing 2 06-13-2010 11:36 PM
Yeast Bank- Wild Yeast/bacteria Jsta Porter Lambic & Wild Brewing 7 04-21-2009 01:20 PM