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Home Brew Forums > Home Brewing Beer > Lambic & Wild Brewing > Brett vs lacto
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Old 12-13-2012, 02:17 PM   #11
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Originally Posted by kaz4121 View Post
The flavor contributed by Brettanomyces is often called barnyard, but has also been described as gamy, or as smelling like damp wool, leather, wet fur, a sweaty saddle or horse blanket, or a butcher
I am relatively new to sour beers, but have been trying them for the past year and have two attempts in secondary ferment..... but for the life of me, I just cannot get past the above description. I always see it in relation to brett, and it is beyond me how any of those things could ever be perceived as desirable in any beverage......ever.
Mmmmmmmm your beer is so good - it tastes like gamy, sweaty, wet, horse. Please pour me another

For me that pretty much steers towards more of lacto, than brett flavors I am looking for. I have used the Roeselare blend in both of the ones I did. Figured I would use the "shotgun" approach as a beginner.
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Old 12-13-2012, 02:38 PM   #12
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Originally Posted by Braufessor

I am relatively new to sour beers, but have been trying them for the past year and have two attempts in secondary ferment..... but for the life of me, I just cannot get past the above description. I always see it in relation to brett, and it is beyond me how any of those things could ever be perceived as desirable in any beverage......ever.
Mmmmmmmm your beer is so good - it tastes like gamy, sweaty, wet, horse. Please pour me another

For me that pretty much steers towards more of lacto, than brett flavors I am looking for. I have used the Roeselare blend in both of the ones I did. Figured I would use the "shotgun" approach as a beginner.
Don't get scared off by people using tired old descriptors for Brett beer. 'Horseblanket' is just a term, very few people have any idea what a saddle pad smells like or a barnyard for that matter. Just what the hell is a barnyard anyway? I imagine it as the pastoral barnyard of yore with all the animals hanging out together, maybe a singing bluebird or a talking pig. Don't see that much these days. Rant over.
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Old 12-13-2012, 03:34 PM   #13
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Sounds like you can do some experimenting, I'd make a 10 gallon batch and split it up into several small batches. 1) Control: fermented with wyeast 1056, 2) Fermented with wyeast 5335 Lacto 3) wyeast 5733 Pedio 4) wyeast 5112 Brett Bux, and lastly wyeast 3763 Rosselaire blend. Each would be a 2 gal batch from the same wort.

Should be interesting,

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Old 12-16-2012, 11:57 AM   #14
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Actually such descriptors are not bad in themselves. Wines often have a cigar tobacco or leather quality--two qualities I always look for in a red and buy every time I find them. These are not bad, but pleasurable for many. My wife hates them, but I love them because they bring back so many thoughts and memories. As for the barnyard and horse blanket smells, I've spent many hours on a horse and many years in barnyards and find the aromas heavenly. Don't forget that smell, and its related sense taste, are our most powerful memory and emotion inducing senses. How often have you wafted a brief slight smell that took you back to a childhood memory that you weren't even aware of before? Imagine someone growing up in a pastoral setting lifting a glass to their nose and sensing the smell of the barnyard or even their favorite horse. It would transport them back immediately. To a city dweller these smells may sound bad, but to a country kid these are the smells of home, fun and great pleasure.

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Old 12-17-2012, 04:30 PM   #15
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Hey guys,

I am looking at starting to sour some beers. I am unsure if I want to use lacto or Brett. Can you recommend me a few good commercial examples of each? Maybe some straight Brett, straight lacto, and a mix

Thanks,
Chip
Brett isn't a souring agent, so if you are looking to make a sour beer, you'll need to use lacto. Look into berliner weisses. Especially this one: http://www.ratebeer.com/beer/1809-be...-weisse/72316/
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