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-   -   Brett B; What should I make? (http://www.homebrewtalk.com/f127/brett-b-what-should-i-make-377550/)

Bert1097 12-31-2012 02:20 PM

Brett B; What should I make?
 
Hey guys, ended up with an extra packet of Wyeast 5112 Brett B. I already have a Bretted saison going and I would really like to use what I have sooner rather than later. I was thinking about an all Brett American Stout but would like to hear what everyone else has to say.

liquiditynerd 12-31-2012 02:37 PM

I like it. I've been toying with the idea of a Sweet n Sour Stout as well.

CadillacAndy 12-31-2012 09:21 PM

An all Brett B American Stout sounds interesting. I've found that Brett B is the funkiest/horsiest/barn yardiest of the 3 standard Brett strains when used for primary. I've also noticed that beers with Brett primary fermentations are much more thin than their sacch counter parts. There is a scientific explanation for this, that I can't quite remember, but I think it had to do with Brett not producing glyercols like sacch does. So if you're aiming for a heavy bodied stout, I'd err on the side of making it thicker than where you'd want to end up - oats, flaked barley, etc.

AmandaK 12-31-2012 11:01 PM

I'm making another Brett B Saison with tart cherries here soon.

bradjoiner 01-01-2013 12:24 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by cadillacandy (Post 4732982)
An all Brett B American Stout sounds interesting. I've found that Brett B is the funkiest/horsiest/barn yardiest of the 3 standard Brett strains when used for primary. I've also noticed that beers with Brett primary fermentations are much more thin than their sacch counter parts. There is a scientific explanation for this, that I can't quite remember, but I think it had to do with Brett not producing glyercols like sacch does. So if you're aiming for a heavy bodied stout, I'd err on the side of making it thicker than where you'd want to end up - oats, flaked barley, etc.

yep brett doesn't make the glycerol I believe I heard it on the Chad Yakobson presentation. As far as the all brett I think a brown porter might work better than a all brett stout. But I personally prefer all stouts to have a huge body.

TNGabe 01-01-2013 05:28 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by bradjoiner (Post 4733495)
yep brett doesn't make the glycerol I believe I heard it on the Chad Yakobson presentation. As far as the all brett I think a brown porter might work better than a all brett stout. But I personally prefer all stouts to have a huge body.

Trying to pick up all the nuggets of Chad's knowledge scattered around the internet is hard. Is this from the youtube from the Music City presentation? Haven't watched most of that yet.

Stout might be hard to pull off with all brett. Chad has said he thinks roasted barley and very dark malts result in very astringent or acrid mouthfeel & flavor in a brett beer. I brewed a beer with brett C that was planned as a Belgian style stout. Not what I got, it's very tart, lots of red fruit. For reference my recipe was:

11 lb Riverbend Heritage Malt (6row, vienna-ish)
1.5 lb Flaked Barley
.75 lb Special B
.75 lb CaraPils - wanted more variety of fermentables w/out adding more dark malt and I wanted to use it up
.75 lb Castle de-bittered Black
.25 lb Roasted Barley
1 lb Dark syrup - not sure why I used this, guessing it was because I do in my belgian stout. Will re-brew without for comparison

1/2 oz Brewer's Gold - first wort. In a tea ball, removed at start of boil

Pitched wlp 645 stepped up twice in 1.5l starters, maybe 200ml thick slurry, but my note taking was sub-par on this one. I'd imagaine you'll get less flavor with higher pitching rates.

1.060 OG, 1.008 FG @ bottling. Bottled 5 days ago. I'm trying to wait at least another week to pop one.

bradjoiner 01-01-2013 09:52 PM

if my memory serves me right I heard it during the NHC presentation


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