Electric Brewing Supply 30A BCS Giveaway!


Home Brew Forums > Home Brewing Beer > Lambic & Wild Brewing > Bottling Sour Beers
Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools
Old 11-07-2011, 12:38 AM   #1
Calder
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Mar 2010
Location: Ohio
Posts: 5,548
Liked 257 Times on 230 Posts
Likes Given: 3

Default Bottling Sour Beers

This probably should be in the general beer section, but I thought I might get more knowledgeable input in this forum. Some questions about using bottles:

- I have a number of Jolly Pumpkin bottles. I've not tried to use them yet. Do they take normal bottles caps, and will standard cappers work. Since the bottle gets bigger below the cap, I'm thinking there may be a problem.

- Do the small Duvel and Chimay type bottles take higher pressures than regular bottles, and do they take standard caps?

- Large Belgian bottles (and champagne bottles) needing corks and cages. Cages are re-usable, are corks? What are the best corks to use. Anything to know about the difference between Belgian bottles and Champagne bottles. I'm starting to collect a lot of these bottles and would like to use them for high carbonation beers, but want to know what I am getting in to.

__________________
Calder is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 11-07-2011, 02:39 AM   #2
blizzard
HBT_LIFETIMESUPPORTER.png
Feedback Score: 17 reviews
 
blizzard's Avatar
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Mar 2009
Location: Denver, CO
Posts: 1,580
Liked 197 Times on 146 Posts
Likes Given: 87

Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Calder View Post
- Do the small Duvel and Chimay type bottles take higher pressures than regular bottles, and do they take standard caps?
They take higher pressure since they are thicker glass. The smaller 11 oz bottles take regular caps. I think the larger Chimay bottles are corked and don't take caps, but I haven't bought one in awhile.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Calder View Post
- Large Belgian bottles (and champagne bottles) needing corks and cages. Cages are re-usable, are corks? What are the best corks to use.
I wouldn't reuse cages. There is a lot of stress on the metal in twisting and untwisting them. Plastic corks are re-useable, but I wouldn't reuse other corks.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Calder View Post
Anything to know about the difference between Belgian bottles and Champagne bottles. I'm starting to collect a lot of these bottles and would like to use them for high carbonation beers, but want to know what I am getting in to.
A couple of differences - champagne bottles are typically green, which isn't as good for beer. I've seen some belgian beer bottles that are brown, but are shaped just like champagne bottles. For those the only difference is color. In either case you can cork/cage or cap, but some will take 29mm caps instead of they typical 26mm size. For belgian bottles that are sort of straight with a thick neck (like Lost Abbey bottles) those can't be capped.
__________________

Primary/Secondary/Bottles/Kegged: Delicious, delicious beer

blizzard is online now
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 11-07-2011, 02:50 AM   #3
blizzard
HBT_LIFETIMESUPPORTER.png
Feedback Score: 17 reviews
 
blizzard's Avatar
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Mar 2009
Location: Denver, CO
Posts: 1,580
Liked 197 Times on 146 Posts
Likes Given: 87

Default

edit: double post

__________________

Primary/Secondary/Bottles/Kegged: Delicious, delicious beer


Reason: double post
blizzard is online now
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 11-07-2011, 03:12 AM   #4
ReverseApacheMaster
Registered User
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Jul 2009
Location: Keller, Texas
Posts: 4,887
Liked 229 Times on 192 Posts

Default

I have found plastic corks normally fit in the big Belgian bottles, but every once in a while one doesn't create a good seal and you end up with flat beer. I have used them in regular champagne bottles with no problem.

If you buy champagne bottles from a HBS they typically are thinner glass but will take the normal bottle cap without needing to use a smaller cap -- like most European bottles do -- or a larger cap -- like most champagne bottles. Plastic corks do not fit in that kind of bottle.

If you have the smaller Belgian bottles they will take greater pressure, although I am unsure how high they go. Probably up to 4-5 volumes.

__________________
ReverseApacheMaster is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 11-07-2011, 04:44 PM   #5
nofootbreak
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Jul 2011
Location: ft collins, co
Posts: 139
Liked 9 Times on 7 Posts
Likes Given: 1

Default

Ive used jolly pumpkin bottles without a problem.

__________________
nofootbreak is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 11-07-2011, 05:55 PM   #6
dcHokie
HBT_SUPPORTER.png
Feedback Score: 1 reviews
 
dcHokie's Avatar
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Mar 2010
Location: Washington, DC
Posts: 1,674
Liked 241 Times on 185 Posts
Likes Given: 178

Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by nofootbreak View Post
Ive used jolly pumpkin bottles without a problem.
ditto. The JP bottles are great, but I don't think you can use the wing-style Emily capper. I recall needing to use a bench capper because they are more bulbous just below the rim (that's what she said)
__________________

Aging: Sour Solera, Flemish Gold, Repas du Matin Sour Table Beer, Flanders Red, Anejo Rum Sour, Brett Brown, Sour blonde, Funky Barleywine Barrel, Sour Rye Whiskey Barrel
Bottled: Cherry Oud Bruin, Le Batard Solera, Sour Stout, Wild Ale, Brett Belgian Rye Stout, Berliner Weisse, FlandersPale, Brett Old Ale, Funky Fig Saison, Mango BGSA, Rapture RIS, Brett Saison
dcHokie is online now
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 11-07-2011, 06:58 PM   #7
smokinghole
Senior Member
HBT_LIFETIMESUPPORTER.png
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
 
smokinghole's Avatar
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Nov 2009
Location: Lucid Dream Land
Posts: 2,913
Liked 121 Times on 100 Posts
Likes Given: 12

Default

You will likely need a bench capper for the crown cap belgian bottles as used by JP. You can also fit a cork and cage on there if I'm not mistaken. I believe I have done that in the recent past with no problems.

The chimay and duvel bottles will certainly take higher pressures. Just weigh the bottles they have much more glass compared to standard longnecks. They take standard 26mm caps. In fact I have only had one beer ever that came in a long neck beer bottle with 29mm caps. It was some sort of German beer I think. It seems most beers around the world get 26mm caps.

Champagne bottles whether green or brown are fine for beer. You can likely cap them. As mentioned some take 26mm caps and some take 29mm caps. You can also easily cork/cage them. The belgian bottles that Chimay and Ommegang use I call bullnose bottles. Also as said they only take cages and corks. They take the larger 25.5mm corks where most champagne bottles can take the 23.5mm corks. I bought a ton of 25.5mm corks and use them interchangeably between my bullnose bottles and my champagne bottles. I have zero reservations about bottling in green bottles because I don't keep my beer stored in sunlight. I keep my beer boxed up in a closet or in the fridge. The green/brown debate is valid for store shelves but I don't think it holds much importance in my dark closet.

__________________

Going through life is hard.
Going through life stupid is harder.

smokinghole is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 11-07-2011, 09:18 PM   #8
Wahoo
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Feb 2010
Location: Fairfield, CT
Posts: 52
Liked 2 Times on 2 Posts
Likes Given: 1

Default

A red emily capper WILL work if you use the reverse the metal sheet that holds the neck to the 29mm side. I know this is hard to imagine.... but the part of the capper that holds the neck.... can be reversed! Pull it out with needlenose pliers and swap it.

If you want to use 29mm caps you need a larger bell. But a lot of US champange style bottles take 26mm caps but the neck is as large as the european bottles. If you don't do this you can shatter the neck.

__________________
Wahoo is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 11-08-2011, 01:00 AM   #9
pohldogg
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Apr 2011
Location: louisville, KY
Posts: 287
Liked 31 Times on 18 Posts
Likes Given: 2

Default

I've used my emily capper for JP bottles but it's a pain. Even with the metal piece reversed the shape of the jp neck makes getting a grip difficult. A bench capper would be much easier.

The capper works great for champagne bottles though.

__________________
pohldogg is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 11-08-2011, 01:51 AM   #10
stevehollx
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Dec 2010
Location: Durham, NC
Posts: 53
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Wahoo View Post
Pull it out with needlenose pliers and swap it.
HAH! I always used a screwdriver from the back to force the plate out, and always thought there had to be an easier way. Needle-nose pliers make way too much sense.
__________________
Drinking: Oaked Tripel * Strong Dark Belgian (100% Brett L & C) * Golden Raisin Abbey Ale * Fantome Printemps
Bulk Aging: Pale Sour * Consecration Clone * Flanders Red * Lambic Solera * Soured Tripel * KBS Clone
Next Up: Dark Fig Brandy Saison
stevehollx is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Reply



Quick Reply
Message:
Options
Thread Tools


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Cranberries and sour beers lacticacid Lambic & Wild Brewing 18 12-30-2012 05:00 PM
Age Sour Beers in Sealed Plastic Buckets Almighty Lambic & Wild Brewing 15 11-08-2011 02:51 AM
Brewing sour beers and winemaking in the same environment? rawlus Lambic & Wild Brewing 3 06-29-2011 11:06 AM
Newbie to sour beers need some help jtejedor Lambic & Wild Brewing 6 02-17-2011 03:01 PM
Question about secondary for sour beers RJSkypala Lambic & Wild Brewing 3 01-24-2011 07:27 PM