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Old 02-13-2014, 12:00 PM   #11
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I did something similar to this recently. I brewed 10 gallons of Farmhouse Mild, fermenting with a mixture of WY3725 and grown up dregs from Hill Farmstead and Crooked Stave, and using a moderate dose of American hops. For half I wanted to experiment a bit. Once the beer got down to 1.002 or so, I blended half of the batch with 6 month old blonde wild (already at 1.000, fermented solely with lambic dregs) at a roughly 85/15 ratio.

The blend really enhanced both beers. The tropical fruit and citrus character from the hops and the Brett really came through and underneath there was a nice lemon-like acidity. I've been going through the bottles quickly, but am making sure to put a few away so that I can see how it develops over time.

Let us know how your experiment turns out! I'd love to do something like this on a regular schedule, and have been thinking about it since I listened to that JK podcast. Another thing I want to try is a saison solera like Sante Adairius does with Cask 200. There's a description of that here: http://www.ratebeer.com/beer/sante-adairius-cask-200/224892/



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Old 02-14-2014, 03:17 PM   #12
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Quote:
Originally Posted by TNGabe View Post
If I'm blending 4 parts saison that's at 1.005 and 1 part sour beer that's at 1.000, that would make for an avg gravity of 1.004. I would expect to reach 1.000 and produce 2 additional volumes of carbonation. If I want the beer carbed to 3.5 volumes, I'd use the priming calculation for 1.5 volumes.
So you're saying 1 gravity point equals .5 volumes of CO2? I just want to make sure. I've never blended sours before but I want to in the near future.


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Old 02-16-2014, 10:40 AM   #13
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So you're saying 1 gravity point equals .5 volumes of CO2? I just want to make sure. I've never blended sours before but I want to in the near future.
That's correct.
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Old 02-16-2014, 07:58 PM   #14
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Doesn't that technically make it a Geuze?
Not at all. A Gueuze is a blend of different aged lambics, not lambic and saison.
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Old 03-09-2014, 06:15 AM   #15
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I splashed out for a small bottle of Brasserie des Franches Montagne √225 Saison a few weeks ago, finally got round to trying it this evening, and its got me even more excited about trying something like this. People often say that sour and bitter don't go well together, but for me at least the combination here is wonderful. Fruity, mouth watering sourness, along with a dry and lingering bitterness.

It makes me wonder what proportions they blended it at. The sourness and bitterness are both so assertive, so I would imagine they either used a very sour base beer, or that there was some refermentation by the souring bugs after the young bitter beer was blended with the old sour.

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Old 03-09-2014, 01:20 PM   #16
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I splashed out for a small bottle of Brasserie des Franches Montagne √225 Saison a few weeks ago, finally got round to trying it this evening, and its got me even more excited about trying something like this. People often say that sour and bitter don't go well together, but for me at least the combination here is wonderful. Fruity, mouth watering sourness, along with a dry and lingering bitterness.

It makes me wonder what proportions they blended it at. The sourness and bitterness are both so assertive, so I would imagine they either used a very sour base beer, or that there was some refermentation by the souring bugs after the young bitter beer was blended with the old sour.
I really enjoyed that beer when I had it on draft, maybe I'll pick up a bottle sometime but I've had a hard time pulling the trigger. As far as I know it's not blended. It's a saison aged in barrels that have been used for Bon Chien.

http://www.bunitedint.com/information/brands/description/451/
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Old 03-09-2014, 02:50 PM   #17
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It is pricey. In only bought a 330ml, but I'm glad I did.

My French isn't great, but if you click on the link in my post to the BFM site, they mention cutting old beer with young bitter beer:

Quote:
Je déguste et me viens l'idée de couper cette vieille bière avec la même mais très fraîche et bien amère.
Says something like: I taste it, and the idea comes to me to cut the old beer with the same beer, but young and very bitter.

They also then go on to mention a conversation with Yvan de Baets, who told them that this was an old Belgian practice.

(I think they also make fun of the US beer market a bit too, saying they called it "historical" because they were sending it here. But I might be misunderstanding it.)


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