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Old 04-04-2012, 09:28 PM   #41
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What about whine the yeast afterwords? I am assuming that it will be OK since the wort will have been boiled (briefly). But I don't want to capture any stray bugs in my yeast...

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Old 04-05-2012, 05:13 AM   #42
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Oops, whine = washing

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Old 04-05-2012, 12:53 PM   #43
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You won't be able to wash the yeast to have only Saccharomyces remaining. You will have whatever mixture of yeast, lacto, etc. after washing.

If you wanted to brew a kolsch that isn't sour after a Berlinner, you'll have to buy more yeast.

I wouldn't think it to be worth it to buy a vial of yeast and propagate it for a berlinner. You won't get much yeast character to begin with. If you have some extra slurry lying around...then go for it!

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Old 04-05-2012, 07:34 PM   #44
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Originally Posted by storunner13
You won't be able to wash the yeast to have only Saccharomyces remaining. You will have whatever mixture of yeast, lacto, etc. after washing.

If you wanted to brew a kolsch that isn't sour after a Berlinner, you'll have to buy more yeast.

I wouldn't think it to be worth it to buy a vial of yeast and propagate it for a berlinner. You won't get much yeast character to begin with. If you have some extra slurry lying around...then go for it!
Hmmm, so boiling will not kill off the lacto in the wort? I kind of thought I would be safe since I am souring the mash, then boiling, then pitching yeast after the bacteria has already done its job...
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Old 04-05-2012, 08:10 PM   #45
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Oh...then you'll be fine. I was not aware that you were boiling the beer after having pitched the lacto.

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Old 04-05-2012, 08:25 PM   #46
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I did not read all 5 pages but if you do a no boil make damn sure you don't have chlorine in your water or your beer will taste like bandaids. I know from experience.

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Old 04-05-2012, 09:28 PM   #47
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I have VERY neutral water. But I am doing a 15 minute boil as well.

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Old 04-10-2012, 03:47 AM   #48
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I just transferred my first ever BW into secondary and it smelled very sour/TANGY . I did a homemade lacto starter(qt size) a week before I brewed and during the brew day I kept the starter very warm. I pitched the lacto starter first and kept it very warm for 12-24 hrs then pitched us05 from a qt sized starter 36 hrs after the end of the boil(or so). Even though I haven't tasted it yet, the smell is exactly what I was expecting. I'm kinda hopeful for this, so I can brew it again.

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Old 04-10-2012, 01:12 PM   #49
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So I decided to go the sour mash direction, and it has been souring over the weekend and my plans were to boil it and pitch yeast today. This thing smells HORRIBLE... I mean, it smells like garbage...

Did I do it right? Is the final product going to smell/taste like garbage? I don't really want to take the loss on the yeast if this thing comes out as bad as it smells.

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Old 04-10-2012, 03:04 PM   #50
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It looks like you have encountered what most other people encounter doing a sour mash..! If you do a search for “Berliner Weiss” you’ll find many accounts of the same thing. I can’t remember whether or not this will disappear completely, but I think a boil will drive away some of those aromatics, as will a good ferment from the yeast. You can find out what others have done in the other threads.

These accounts are why I avoided souring the whole mash. There are too many chances for Enterobacter to lay claim over the wort before the pH drops significantly. Did you try covering the mash with plastic wrap? (putting the plastic right on top of the wort and pushing out all air bubbles?) Supposedly the anaerobic environment inhibits Enterobacter and other foul organisms. I think some people have had good results with that.

If you’re worried, just pitch a clean dry yeast. That way you’re only out $10 in grain and yeast if it goes badly.

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