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Old 01-10-2013, 10:24 PM   #11
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Originally Posted by beernewb71 View Post
A year is the firm timeline for a sour beer?
How patient ARE you???

I've got meads that have been in process for over a year. I had a wee heavy in process for almost a fully year. For me, it's not that much trouble. For you, well...
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Old 01-10-2013, 11:20 PM   #12
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I'm patient...I haven't fermented any kind of alcohol yet but I do have experience with other ferments (sauerkraut, hot sauce, sourdough).

I will heed the advice to make other styles of beer while I'm waiting but I still have a couple questions (your patience is appreciated).

1) From what I've read people here seem to be trying to capture wild yeast in the air or from malt extract left out. To me it would make more sense to take whole barely, unhulled, grind it up into a flour and create a liquid sourdough starter. Then you would have a guaranteed inoculant, though still wild.

2) I will take your words for it but why is sanitation such a big deal? Other types of fermentation don't stress on sanitation because the lactic acid bacteria produce lactic acid which acts as a preservative and keeps the bad guys out.

3) This is the process, simplified without beer terminology, in my head:
-Take cracked malted grain and hops, steep them at specific temperatures for specific times.
-Rinse the grain of residual sugars.
-Filter the wort of hops/grains
-Cool wort
-Add barley starter
-Put in carboy

What am I missing?

Thanks again for all the guidance.

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Old 01-10-2013, 11:57 PM   #13
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Unless you take a shortcut (berlinner, sour mash, 100% brett), a traditional sour takes at minimum 12 months to develop. You should expect 18-36 months before bottling, from what I've read.
Now is this true? My homebrew club chief said he was able to make a guese (sp?) in about 8 months, just short of 9.
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Old 01-11-2013, 01:23 AM   #14
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Now is this true? My homebrew club chief said he was able to make a guese (sp?) in about 8 months, just short of 9.
A gueuze is a blend of old and young lambic. Usually 2-3 year old and 1 year old. So making a blend of old and young in 8 months doesn't add up.
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Old 01-11-2013, 03:24 AM   #15
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To the OP: I myself have only been brewing since the end of May. Granted in the short time I have done ~13 batches (can't remember off hand). Also I have done a Hard Cider and my most recent brew was a Flanders Red which I plan to age atleast a year.

I have mixed feelings about your question. When I started I jumped straight away into AG brewing and was told it was too ambitious (Check my threads)... Long story short I made one of the best IPA's I'd ever had. Having said that, my confidence, skill and knowledge has increased atleast ten fold since then.

So, on one hand I say go for it! Worst case scenario you throw 30-40 bucks at an awesome experiment, that with enough research and effort, may end up with a surprisingly pleasent end result (or end up as drain food). On the other hand, I agree with everyone else that learning the brewing process and what works best for you and your new brewing system first will undoubtedly help to increase your chance of success. Trust me I had as many questions as I did answers after my first two brews.

So either way, you will probably want to brew some simpler more instantly gratifying recipes in the near future, so why not start with them? Either way good luck, and happy brewing!

TacoTony: Maybe you are thinking of a gose? From what I have read those are much faster, like a berlinner weisse?

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Old 01-11-2013, 03:33 AM   #16
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I made a mead that took 3 years to be decent, finally tastes great at 6 years. I can't imagine starting out in wine making doing this as my first ferment.

I might suggest starting with something simpler for your first brew, even if it is all grain, just to get a few brews under your belt. Make some beer until you are comfortable with your system before jumping into something that take a long time investment. My first brew was extract, and it felt too much like a simple baking recipe, and I moved to all-grain for my second brew. While it wasn't complicated, there was a learning curve in just learning my system, my equipment, getting the right gravity for my wort, etc. Enough that I definitely wouldn't want it to be something that I could not taste for 12+ months.

My suggestion would be to get your system down, then take some more ambitious steps. Of course, I could be wrong.

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Old 01-11-2013, 03:41 AM   #17
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IMO, if you want to mess with a wild fermentation on your first batch, then make it a 3qt batch in a gallon fermenter. Get some kind of fruit that hasn't been cleaned or sprayed with anything nasty and drop it in. Give it plenty of O2 and see what happens.

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Old 01-11-2013, 03:43 AM   #18
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Quote:
Originally Posted by beernewb71
I'm patient...I haven't fermented any kind of alcohol yet but I do have experience with other ferments (sauerkraut, hot sauce, sourdough).

I will heed the advice to make other styles of beer while I'm waiting but I still have a couple questions (your patience is appreciated).

1) From what I've read people here seem to be trying to capture wild yeast in the air or from malt extract left out. To me it would make more sense to take whole barely, unhulled, grind it up into a flour and create a liquid sourdough starter. Then you would have a guaranteed inoculant, though still wild.

2) I will take your words for it but why is sanitation such a big deal? Other types of fermentation don't stress on sanitation because the lactic acid bacteria produce lactic acid which acts as a preservative and keeps the bad guys out.

3) This is the process, simplified without beer terminology, in my head:
-Take cracked malted grain and hops, steep them at specific temperatures for specific times.
-Rinse the grain of residual sugars.
-Filter the wort of hops/grains
-Cool wort
-Add barley starter
-Put in carboy

What am I missing?

Thanks again for all the guidance.
You don't steep the hops. After you steep(mash) the grain and rinse(sparge) them you bring the wort to a boil and add hops then.
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Old 01-11-2013, 03:56 AM   #19
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Originally Posted by Lushife View Post
You don't steep the hops. After you steep(mash) the grain and rinse(sparge) them you bring the wort to a boil and add hops then.
Thanks for the correction!
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Old 01-11-2013, 04:07 AM   #20
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Originally Posted by cadillacandy View Post
A gueuze is a blend of old and young lambic. Usually 2-3 year old and 1 year old. So making a blend of old and young in 8 months doesn't add up.
Oh, OK. Maybe it was the lambic part I heard. Can you do a lambic in 9 months, or is a year really the limit?
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