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Home Brew Forums > Home Brewing Beer > Recipes/Ingredients > Yakima Gold Hops
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Old 10-05-2008, 02:10 AM   #1
Chip
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Default Yakima Gold Hops

While I was at my local brew shop today it was mentioned that Yakima Gold was a good substitute for Fuggle or Kent Goldikng for the mild I was brewing. Living here in Washington State the Yakima Gold would be a local hop which I find interesting.

I searched Google and could not find a description of this hop variety, so I turn to the forum to see if anyone has any information on this hop.

Thanks in advance for your help and assistance.

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Old 10-05-2008, 02:26 AM   #2
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I would use Willamette for a Fuggles substitute. Yak Mag are high alpha and citrusy like Columbus.

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Old 10-05-2008, 07:00 AM   #3
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Kent Goldings are only called that because they are grown in Kent. The Golding variety takes on the name of where it is grown, so Yakima Goldings (nothing like mag) are basically the same variety, just grom in Yakima instead of East Kent. So it isn't just a substitue, it is basically the same hop.

I tried to grow some Texas Goldings this year, it was too hot for them.

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Old 10-24-2008, 04:19 AM   #4
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Default Yes! I agree.

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Originally Posted by TeleTwanger View Post
I would use Willamette for a Fuggles substitute. Yak Mag are high alpha and citrusy like Columbus.
Very interesting that you say that. Willamette is just plain awesome, but moreso regarding your comparison to Yak/Columbus.

Over the past six months or so I've brewed several high gravity beers resulting in a wonderful ales comparable to Arogant Bastard (except mine's better, and I'm far more modest about it, *ha ha*).

I brewed two batches in a row, one using Yakima Mag and the next using Columbus. Both were wonderful and citrusy, but I would say the Yak had a little more character and more hoppiness, but the Columbus was great and just happened to be in a malty, high f.g. brew. Columbus hits you in the face harder, and has a nice aroma and after-bite, but it doesn't seem to measure up to the Yak in terms of the hop prominence and display in the brew.

All I'm saying, I guess, is that all of the above mentioned hops are outanding, and pretty much kick ass in general, always. . .
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Old 10-24-2008, 12:19 PM   #5
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Yakima Goldings are a nice, mild hop. I use them exclusively in my Blonde Ale and they add a great earthy tone to the brew. I'd recommend them!

http://www.homebrewtalk.com/f62/yaki...nde-ale-78635/

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Old 10-24-2008, 02:40 PM   #6
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Originally Posted by BarleyWater View Post
Kent Goldings are only called that because they are grown in Kent. The Golding variety takes on the name of where it is grown, so Yakima Goldings (nothing like mag) are basically the same variety, just grom in Yakima instead of East Kent. So it isn't just a substitue, it is basically the same hop.
They may be the same cultivar, have the same genetics, but I challenge anyone who claims that hops of the same variety cultivated in different places retain the same characteristics of the parent cultivar. Yes, at the core it's the same plant, but the flowers take on characteristics based on the microclimate, soil chemistry and agricultural techniques of the location.

Goldings cultivated in the Yakima Valley are not the same as Goldings grown in East Kent. Their flavor and aroma characteristics are perceptibly different. That's why East Kent Goldings fetch a price premium over Yakima Goldings - it's not just the name, it's that the experienced brewer knows that a beer made with one will be perceived differently than the other by the drinker.

Fuggles is different from Styrian Goldings is different from US Fuggles. For that matter, US Hallertau is different from Hallertau Hersbrucker is different from Hallertau Mittelfrüher is different from Hallertau Hallertauer!

Each cultivar has distinct characteristics. Anyone who says they're the same can safely be told, without fear of contradiction, "Bollocks."



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Old 10-24-2008, 02:51 PM   #7
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Originally Posted by BobNQ3X View Post
Goldings cultivated in the Yakima Valley are not the same as Goldings grown in East Kent. Their flavor and aroma characteristics are perceptibly different. That's why East Kent Goldings fetch a price premium over Yakima Goldings - it's not just the name, it's that the experienced brewer knows that a beer made with one will be perceived differently than the other by the drinker.
Definitely agreed. However I can attest that the Yakima Goldings are a passable substitute for EKGs or Fuggles. They're by no stretch "identical", but they make a very tasty substitute. I'm just about to finish up the pound of them I bought last year.

As for the rather confusing exchange up above -- Yakima Goldings and Yakima Magnum could not be further from the same!!! You are talking about two different strains of hop, that both happen to be grown in the Yakima region. That's all. They're not the same hop.
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Old 10-24-2008, 02:55 PM   #8
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Originally Posted by BobNQ3X View Post
They may be the same cultivar, have the same genetics, but I challenge anyone who claims that hops of the same variety cultivated in different places retain the same characteristics of the parent cultivar. Yes, at the core it's the same plant, but the flowers take on characteristics based on the microclimate, soil chemistry and agricultural techniques of the location.

Goldings cultivated in the Yakima Valley are not the same as Goldings grown in East Kent. Their flavor and aroma characteristics are perceptibly different. That's why East Kent Goldings fetch a price premium over Yakima Goldings - it's not just the name, it's that the experienced brewer knows that a beer made with one will be perceived differently than the other by the drinker.

Fuggles is different from Styrian Goldings is different from US Fuggles. For that matter, US Hallertau is different from Hallertau Hersbrucker is different from Hallertau Mittelfrüher is different from Hallertau Hallertauer!

Each cultivar has distinct characteristics. Anyone who says they're the same can safely be told, without fear of contradiction, "Bollocks."



Bob
This is probably true to some degree. To what degree is the question. If there is a dramatic difference then think about all of the homegrown hops. Does anyone growing Cascade really have Cascade??? Is the only "true" Cascade grown in the state of Washington?? What will my Cascade taste like as it is grown in Baltimore? Baltocade? Just some thoughts for your minds
FWIW: I have Baltocade, Baltonuggets and a lot of Baltohood
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Old 10-24-2008, 02:58 PM   #9
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As for the rather confusing exchange up above -- Yakima Goldings and Yakima Magnum could not be further from the same!!! You are talking about two different strains of hop, that both happen to be grown in the Yakima region. That's all. They're not the same hop.
I was getting confused and figured something was screwy. Or it was the beers I was knocking back last night.
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Old 10-24-2008, 05:22 PM   #10
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They may be the same cultivar, have the same genetics, but I challenge anyone who claims that hops of the same variety cultivated in different places retain the same characteristics of the parent cultivar.
I accept that challenge. I come from an agricultural family, and have personally grown everything from near-extinct French melons to aromatic herbs, and everything in between. In short, if you know your plant, know its requirements, and satisfy those requirements, you're going to get the same thing, regardless of where they're grown. Everything else is placebo. Now if you want to say the growers in Yakima aren't as adept as those in Kent...well, that's a different line of reasoning entirely.

To complicate the issue, almost universally English hops are used in the boil to some degree or other. Even if they're thrown in at the last moment as aroma hops, those high temperatures are going to have a much larger difference on what you ultimately get in your beer when compared to where it was grown. Indeed, those temperatures make any differences between US and UK -- if present at all -- moot. Your water temp -- whether 212* or 218* or 226* or whatever -- will really determine what you're getting.

And then, of course, one has to factor in transit time, handling, time on the shelf. I'd venture to guess US hops are, by and large, fresher and in better condition when compared to the UK counterparts.

In the same vein, the price difference you're seeing is not a result of differing qualities, or even different aroma profiles, but of the USD/BPS exchange rate, and nothing else. I'd venture to guess the motivation for growing Goldings on this side of the pond was to bypass the perennial exchange rates that always favor the Brits. Even beyond the exchange rate, Yakimas are fetching a high price these days, it's just an in-demand variety.
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