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Old 10-09-2011, 11:30 AM   #21
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Originally Posted by kbuzz View Post
I'm lazy, I haven't read all the posts...so sorry if any of this has already been addressed...but...I used maple syrup in a beer a while ago and I would recommend making sure that the structure of the beer can hold up to it. My beer was cloying as hell...the most overly sweet beer I've made to date. I would recommend plenty of malt backbone for it as well as plenty of IBUs to balance out the sweetness. I think I made carbonated syrup water...been reluctant to use it since...definitely use plenty of hops for sure...
... something else must have been going on, maple syrup is extremely fermentable, if the beer was cloyingly sweet you must have had an issue with fermentation or possibly somewhere else in the recipe (too much crystal malt, something along those lines). Adding any kind of simple sugar, be it corn sugar or Belgian candi sugar or maple sugar, isn't going to add any appreciable sweetness (assuming a healthy fermenation) until the total ABV gets highj enough to kill the yeast.

And adding hops - I wouldn't do anything other than a bittering addition, and be conservative with that. The flavors of most hops are not going to be terribly complementary to the maple, and if you add too much you'll never even notice the maple.
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Old 10-09-2011, 11:51 AM   #22
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Originally Posted by dhouse

That's interesting, since I see that recommended a lot, although I've never heard any feedback about it. What was wrong with it?
It takes about 30 gallons of sap to make a gallon is syrup so 7 gallons in your brew kettle doesn't amount to very much syrup.

They also filter out the silt before bottling.

There was such an off flavor from what I could tell was due to the mineral rich sap.

If you live near any sugar houses who use RO (reverse osmosis) machines you might be able to get some sap after it has been proccessed through the RO machine.

It will have a higher sugar content but also higher minerals I suppose.
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Old 10-09-2011, 03:08 PM   #23
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Originally Posted by the_bird View Post
... something else must have been going on, maple syrup is extremely fermentable, if the beer was cloyingly sweet you must have had an issue with fermentation or possibly somewhere else in the recipe (too much crystal malt, something along those lines). Adding any kind of simple sugar, be it corn sugar or Belgian candi sugar or maple sugar, isn't going to add any appreciable sweetness (assuming a healthy fermenation) until the total ABV gets highj enough to kill the yeast.

And adding hops - I wouldn't do anything other than a bittering addition, and be conservative with that. The flavors of most hops are not going to be terribly complementary to the maple, and if you add too much you'll never even notice the maple.
Might also want to check to make sure it was 100% pure maple syrup with no added funky preservatives or artificial sweeteners.
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Old 01-01-2012, 04:25 PM   #24
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I brewed the A to Z brown Ale in the Extreme Brew book from the dogfish head brewery owner guy yesterday. It calls for 8oz of maple syrup to be added to the primary after the vigorous fermentation has subsided. The wife told me I had to get Grade B maple syrup because it had more maple flavor. Is that what everyone used or did you use Grade A? Grade A is the stuff that is in every supermarket. It is boiled down more and is not a mapley strong.

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Old 01-01-2012, 05:14 PM   #25
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Quote:
Originally Posted by BullGator
I brewed the A to Z brown Ale in the Extreme Brew book from the dogfish head brewery owner guy yesterday. It calls for 8oz of maple syrup to be added to the primary after the vigorous fermentation has subsided. The wife told me I had to get Grade B maple syrup because it had more maple flavor. Is that what everyone used or did you use Grade A? Grade A is the stuff that is in every supermarket. It is boiled down more and is not a mapley strong.
I used grade b for the same reason...the wife is from vt and her family used to make it...
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Old 01-06-2012, 11:13 AM   #26
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Lower grade maple syrup will be less fermentable but it will contribute more towards flavor. Unfortunately, lower grades of maple syrup tend to be much more expensive, you usually have to purchase them at health food stores like Whole Foods, Earth Fare, etc.

That being said, I once brewed a brown ale with grade B maple syrup - it accounted for a bout 10% of my fermentables. I mashed high (I brew AG) so that my beer would have enough dextrins to not be overly dry in the end. If you are a partial grain brewer, I would recommend adding some carapils or dextrin malt to your recipe to achieve the same effect. Though, even at 10%, the maple flavor was there but quite subtle. It worked well for the beer.
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I used grade b for the same reason...the wife is from vt and her family used to make it...
Very true. My Family has a farm with maple trees in Virginia that a family friend taps each year and gives us maple syrup as a thank you. I had good results with about 12oz of grade B for 5 gal of brown ale added to the wort after flame out. I did not cold crash all the bottles as I wanted to see what character they picked up over time. It went from a refreshing light on the pallet beer with maple after taste to a not too special brown ale that was a bit over carbonated after three months of bottle conditioning.
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Old 01-06-2012, 04:20 PM   #27
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I added 12 oz. of grade A dark amber (just what I happened to grab off the shelf) to a brown ale. I added it late in the boil, around 10 minutes left, and it added a subtle hint of maple (not sweet... more of a dry earthy thing). I might try this again next fall and use 8 oz. late boil and 8 oz. at either flame out or directly in the fermentor, possibly trying the grade b.

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Old 01-18-2013, 11:18 PM   #28
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Hi there -

I'm wondering if exclusion of the maple would effect anything else? Does a recipe including the syrup account for having the extra sugars for fermentation? and therefore you'd need to add something else to give it the right gravity?

WjR

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Old 01-31-2014, 10:56 AM   #29
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I agree with everything written here. I boiled golden syrup in a recipe for 5 mins before flame out and the beer came out dry. My mates think it tastes syrupy from the golden syrup but I believe not. It might add texture and colour to your beer but not a strong or pronounced flavour. I assume Golden/Maple is very similar when it comes to fermentable sugars.

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Old 02-03-2014, 01:54 AM   #30
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Default Who here has made a home brew with maple syrup? Advice? Lessons learned?

I have brewed thrice with maple syrup and will be brewing with it again soon.
The amount of maple flavor you will end up with depends completely on the maple syrup grade you use, anything higher than B and the remaining tastes will dry out.
If your lucky and know some maple syrup producers, ask them for their last run of the year, usually the darkest you can get and I can testify that you will be getting great flavours. As for additions, I add it after 24 hours of primary fermentation kick-off (I add 2 kg's to a 5 gallon batch, approx 2 liters or a little bit more than half a gallon) and find it compliments my version of a maple weizenbock extremely well. Ended up with a og of 1.078 after boil of the weizenbock before maple addition, and beersmith estimated it at 1.104 with the extra 2 kg's (4.4 lbs) of maple syrup ( I couldn't get a true gravity after addition of maple syrup since fermentation had already started). Estimated FG was 1.016 and ended up with a true fg of 1.034, leading me to think what hadn't completely fermented was the maple syrup which was high in un-fermentables due to the low grade... and my taste palate can confirm.

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