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Old 11-27-2012, 05:50 PM   #71
Jrod
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When this is done and we decide to brew we have to send a bottle to sauce. Probably needs to be the rule of this thread. If you brew it you must ship a bottle or two.

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Old 11-27-2012, 06:01 PM   #72
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I am drooling in suspense!
Like many others ~ The White Rajah has been a hands down favorite since it touched my picky little lips!

I love the guessing game (as clones should be)

and I will also attempt to brew up the closest clone to the best beer ever!
(once all these great guesses come up with something concrete)

"been following this for days now =) "
Welcome to the party. I've been obsessing over it for months. I think I've been the only one who has actually tried to brew something like it to this point. I figured it would take me several attempts to get it to something in the cloned area. What I had was a good starting point and something I could honestly recommend brewing of your into rajah. It's nice to sit back and hear other opinions finally. And the input from sauce has been fantastic. Trust me, we will keep buying rajah, the clone experience is more about learning the art and gaining knowledge than ripping the brewery off, plus that's not cool.
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Old 11-27-2012, 07:50 PM   #73
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For me its about how to translate the flavors of a beer that I really love into something I can brew. Then you start to realize the ingredients that you like, how they were used, and can incorporate them into what you brew.

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Old 11-27-2012, 09:40 PM   #74
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I just wanna be a better home brewer....I normally use a similar malt backbone...I need to expand my horizons...I've probably put a good portion of cash into their business.....you have no idea how much of this stuff I've consumed.....

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Old 11-28-2012, 03:29 AM   #75
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Originally Posted by Jrod View Post
For me its about how to translate the flavors of a beer that I really love into something I can brew. Then you start to realize the ingredients that you like, how they were used, and can incorporate them into what you brew.
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Originally Posted by BrunstuckyJoe View Post
I just wanna be a better home brewer....I normally use a similar malt backbone...I need to expand my horizons...I've probably put a good portion of cash into their business.....you have no idea how much of this stuff I've consumed.....
That is pretty much what I meant

I finally got to check my color calculations and they were 6. Use it as a rough guideline, it's just a calculation that, in my opinion, is ballpark at best.
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Old 11-28-2012, 04:13 AM   #76
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You are saying the non malt is close on two flaked guesses which best I can figure leaves flaked barley, rye, and oats as the options. Somehow I doubt that spelt or triticale are being used in the production but I could be wrong.

My guess would be flaked barley.

So the hop percentages are off and I'm missing a hop which means I'm wrong about columbus only being used for bittering.

So the new hop percentages go like this and it would have made the original recipe 50% Citra prior to the addition of Nelson.

Citra 30%
Nelson 20%
Centennial 30%
Columbus 10%
Summitt 10%

-With 2-row
-Honey Malt
-Carapils ( I don't really understand the use of carapils I was under the impression that there were no significant flavor contributions and that it only serves as a way to add dextrins and mouthfeel which could be controlled by varying the mash temp.)
-Flaked Barley (Mouth feel and head retention?)

I apparently have alot of preconcieved notions about brewing that I need to get past. lol
Of the flaked malts, I vote flaked rye. . . flaked barley doesn't make a lot of sense to me, use it for mouthfeel and head rention. . . which is what carapils does as well although I'm sure they aren't exactly the same(for one, less protein/chill haze from the carapils). As far as carapils adding dextrins and mouthfeel that is correct. Mashing higher doesn't do exactly the same thing though. Mashing higher will leave longer chain unfermentables (not necessarily just dextrin) which equates to more residual sweetness. Or at least that is my opinion on the subject. We don't want to make a sweet beer here, we want something with a nice broad malt backbone that doesn't stand out too much to support the hops.

@sauce, how does this look for the grist
85% 2 row
5% carapils
5% honey malt
5% flaked rye
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Old 11-28-2012, 12:12 PM   #77
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Mashing higher will leave longer chain unfermentables (not necessarily just dextrin) which equates to more residual sweetness. Or at least that is my opinion on the subject. We don't want to make a sweet beer here, we want something with a nice broad malt backbone that doesn't stand out too much to support the hops.

@sauce, how does this look for the grist
85% 2 row
5% carapils
5% honey malt
5% flaked rye
This beer is a very dry beer. So I agree that it is mashed low 149-150. As the label says "malt take a back seat" but the use of carapils and a flaked product should bring the mouthfeel back up not to mention the amazing head retention and lacing this beer has. The only real "malt backbone" is from the honey malt which adds a nice perceived sweetness. I never would have guessed rye as it has a distinct flavor to me but maybe in a small quantity the dry rye spiciness hides in the hops.
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Old 11-28-2012, 02:01 PM   #78
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This beer is a very dry beer. So I agree that it is mashed low 149-150. As the label says "malt take a back seat" but the use of carapils and a flaked product should bring the mouthfeel back up not to mention the amazing head retention and lacing this beer has. The only real "malt backbone" is from the honey malt which adds a nice perceived sweetness. I never would have guessed rye as it has a distinct flavor to me but maybe in a small quantity the dry rye spiciness hides in the hops.
I agree with all that. The sweetness that I was perceiving I thought came from the hops, specifically Amarillo. Perhaps it was a bit of the honey malt and Nelson that tricked me into thinking that. I suppose it's possible to do the same thing with the rye, in a small percentage I wonder how much you would even notice it in a beer so bold. A lot of the research I did less me to believe 5% flaked rye wasn't very much.
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Old 11-29-2012, 01:47 AM   #79
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Ok, Jrod got the final bit of the grain Bill, it is flaked barley....


Quote:
When this is done and we decide to brew we have to send a bottle to sauce. Probably needs to be the rule of this thread. If you brew it you must ship a bottle or two.
That would be awesome....hell, we could have a lil competition, I could get the owner and my assistants together to do a lil judging.

So tell ya all what......you all have the ingredients now.....lets pick a date and anyone that wants to brew it and send two in for a lil shoot out. Thinkin mid January? We will even come up with some kind of prize package.

.....So now ya might wanna keep your recipe ideas on the down low ;-)

Let me know if your all interested
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Old 11-29-2012, 01:06 PM   #80
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I'm all in. Off to internet stalk some citra.

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