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Old 05-08-2006, 03:02 PM   #1
WeretheBrews
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Default What recipe....

Hey all. I was wondering in opinion what the best tasting ale is? Does the oatmeal stout actually taste like oatmeal? I want an actual sweet tasting beer that isn't really that bitter. What about cheesemans Caramel Cream Ale Recipe?

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Old 05-08-2006, 03:06 PM   #2
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Quote:
Originally Posted by WeretheBrews
Hey all. I was wondering in opinion what the best tasting ale is? Does the oatmeal stout actually taste like oatmeal? I want an actual sweet tasting beer that isn't really that bitter. What about cheesemans Caramel Cream Ale Recipe?

Thoughts/Suggestions
The best tasting ale is the one you made yourself.

Oatmeal in a beer does not add the taste of oats really. It provides a silky-smoothness to the beer. It is quite a nice addition to dark roastey brews.

If you want a sweet beer, you probably want something like a malty brown ale or a sweet stout. If no one actually posts any recipes for you, I can dig up general guidelines out of one of my brewing books later and post them.

-walker
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Old 05-08-2006, 03:17 PM   #3
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Ok very nice man.... Where doyou get your kits from? I am going to learn with extract brewing.... Thanks for the help.

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Old 05-08-2006, 03:18 PM   #4
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Also what is Irish moss man? I keep seeing it any recipes.... where can you get that?

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Old 05-08-2006, 03:24 PM   #5
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Irish Moss is a clarifying agent. It's usually added during about the last 15 minutes of the boil. It coagulates and helps pull trub (unwanted stuff) out of suspension so that the beer can later be easily siphoned off of the trub.

I strongly recommend reading How To Brew (it's available on-line for free or as a hard-copy book: http://www.howtobrew.com/) and/or Papazian's The Complete Joy of Homebrewing. That'll get you up to speed on a lot of this stuff.

If you have a local homebrew store, that'll be your best source of gear and ingredients.

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Old 05-08-2006, 03:24 PM   #6
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I don't use kits anymore. I did for many years, but now I just buy the ingredients ala carte. Stick with kits at the beginning, and as you gain experience, you'll gain an understanding of what the various ingredients add to a brew, and you can then venture out into making your own recipes. That's my opinion anyway.

When I *did* use kits, I used the "Brewer's Best" brand (available from many brew shops, online and in-stores), but I know a lot of guys use kits from a lot of places. Austin Homebrew has some kits that people are very pleased with, so they would be good ones to try (if you order enough, you'll get free shipping, too.)

Irish Moss

What it is: dried seaweed

What it does: you add it with 15 to 20 minutes left in the boil. It rehydrates and helps proteins in the beer clump up together and fall to the bottom of the kettle. It helps make the finished beer more clear (homebrew tends to be a little cloudy.)

Where you get it: any homebrew shop or online retailer will carry this.

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Old 05-08-2006, 03:35 PM   #7
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Thanks fr the info... I am planning on maybe a malty brown ale... I will check out brewers best.... I really do want to make the caramel cream ale, but I think im nt knowledgeable enough to be able to handle it...

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Old 05-08-2006, 03:50 PM   #8
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Quote:
Originally Posted by WeretheBrews
Thanks fr the info... I am planning on maybe a malty brown ale... I will check out brewers best.... I really do want to make the caramel cream ale, but I think im nt knowledgeable enough to be able to handle it...
I would recommend a kit from Austin Homebrew Supply or morebeer.com over a brewer's best kit from a local store. (Yes, I realize I'm contradicting my previous post a bit--so sue me )

Those are huge-volume retailers that ship very fresh ingrediants with their kits, and their kits come with different options about what yeast you get, rather than just getting what the kit comes with.

I agree with Walker's suggestions of a brown ale or sweet stout. You might also try a German style hefeweizen, which is a sweeter, definitewly not bitter beer and a very simple style to brew. But if you do a hefeweizen, it is absolutely essential that you get an appropriate liquid yeast (not a general-purpose dried ale yeast).
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Old 05-08-2006, 03:53 PM   #9
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Alright. I like the idea of adding caramel to a beer. What does this do?

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Old 05-08-2006, 03:59 PM   #10
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Irish yeast is overated. I stopped using it before I switched to AG. My beers turn out just fine, but then again maybe it was the bleach

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