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Old 05-18-2011, 10:53 PM   #21
Pivovar_Koucky
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if you can get amber malt that would be a good substitution for brown malt, it's obviously lighter in color but I think it has a similar sort of subtle roastiness.

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Old 05-18-2011, 10:55 PM   #22
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Chocolate malt, Sometimes a small hint of black patent, and as mentioned before I like to sometime throw a bit of Peat in there as well. Not so much to make it a smoke porter but just enough to know its there. For hops I usually use EKG, Fuggles, and Willamettes. For yeast the standard London ale always works, but I have used Yorkshire sq and have a porter right now that uses Edinburgh.

My last porter I used some black strap molasses too. I also just kegged a porter (Bert Grants perfect porter) that used pure vanilla extract at kegging to.

Did I mention I love Porters and Stouts.

Cheers!

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Old 05-19-2011, 12:09 PM   #23
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Originally Posted by firebird400 View Post
This is great.

Recipes and grain preferences, just the kind of discussion I hoped for.

But since there is no such thing as brown malt available at the local brew store I must order it or find a substitute :/
Amber is the best sub, but IMO victory and biscuit malts are also similar.
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Old 05-19-2011, 03:05 PM   #24
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In my mind a perfect porter is a robust one, with a full body and a nice chocolately/roasty aroma. I don't know if you can brew a decent robust porter without chocolate malt - my house porter recipe uses 8% chocolate (and 2% roasted barely). To get the body right I have used carapils, but recently in my last batch I used 10% oats - its still fermenting but I think it will be a nice touch! Other than that I believe a little bit of medium to dark crystal malts (80 to 120/special B) adds a nice balancing touch to the roasty malts. I also tend to add munich in almost every beer, this usually shows up around 5-10% of my malt bill in porters for a little added malt complexity.

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Old 05-19-2011, 03:32 PM   #25
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For me it is roastiness derrived from a mix of chocolate and black malt at about a 4 to one ratio, some dark crystal and some munich. I need that hint of black malt in the background and I need it to be heavily hopped with an american C hop. WLP007 is good too.....

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Old 05-19-2011, 06:10 PM   #26
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See Coal Porter in my recipe dropdown.

I formulated that recipe ages ago using Terry Foster's excellent book on the style, which I suggest you purchase.

I suggest Crystal, Chocolate and Black Patent malts. To me, Roasted Barley is not appropriate in Porter, because it is the distinctive malt in Stout. Porter needs the phenolic, burnt, ashy character of Black Patent, as well as the nutty, coffee-like tones of Chocolate Malt. A bit of mid-range Crystal gives a nice sweet backbone to the roasted malts. I prefer British specialty malts to American.

With hops, seek balance. Balance is the true indicator that a brewer has mastered his craft; it is difficult to achieve and some never do. In Porter especially, balance is important: The drinker should experience a broad spectrum of flavors and aromas, with no one flavor or aroma dominating the experience. Bitterness from the hops (with perhaps a hint of earthy hops flavor) should enhance the flavors of the roasted grains, with body and residual sweetness from Crystal malt and perhaps a bit of crackery, bready flavors from the base malt (or maybe a touch of Munich malt). Porter should be, in the words of the immortal Michael Jackson, "more-ish". Having one sip should make you want another.

I prefer an English yeast, or at least a fruity American yeast like White Labs Cal V.

So: Don't brew it too strong, don't let any one characteristic stand out, and for heaven's sake don't serve it too cold. Cellar temperature, if you please.

Good luck!

Bob

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Old 05-19-2011, 09:06 PM   #27
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Bob View Post
See Coal Porter in my recipe dropdown.

I formulated that recipe ages ago using Terry Foster's excellent book on the style, which I suggest you purchase.

Good luck!

Bob

Thank you

I went and got me the Porter book, the Stout book and the Oktoberfest book

I will have plenty to read when they get here in e few weeks.

And I am just about to check out your recipe
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Old 05-20-2011, 04:17 PM   #28
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See Coal Porter in my recipe dropdown.


Bob
Why use sugar.

Does it anything other than add to the ABV.

Should the low OG not be reached with all-grain.

Maybe I am strange like that but I feel that brewing all-grain is making beer, partial mash is cheating a bit
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Old 05-23-2011, 11:18 AM   #29
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You're not strange. You're wrong. You can feel however you want. That's your right. It is not, however, correct.

Sugar is used in beer. Many of the best beers on the planet use sugar as part of the grist, including many benchmark examples of styles. Sugar is just another ingredient, another weapon in a good brewer's arsenal. If you're going to dismiss sugar because you feel like it's cheating, you're deliberately denying yourself some excellent beers - like most of the Belgian styles - and displaying yourself as a less-than-knowledgeable brewer.

That's a blunt statement from a guy who's sick to death of pretentious hobbyists who poo-poo sugar. That attitude is a cultural holdover from the days when "homebrew" meant a little bit of hopped extract and a LOT of sugar. That's not what my recipe is, and it's not what a wise brewer's use of sugar means.

Now, if you really want the reasoning behind why there's sugar in the recipe and not just to take a cheap, passive-aggressive shot at people who use sugar, it's because I wanted to lighten the body slightly and maintain a given original gravity in a recipe that needs to be brewed on a system that can only handle a certain volume of grist. The original recipe was developed on a 3.5-bbl (4hl) system and was scaled down to 5 gallons. That required some tweaking.

Grumble,

Bob

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Old 05-24-2011, 01:05 PM   #30
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Brewers sugars (including invert, glucose, treacle, etc) are used quite a bit in the UK. Personally I've never had a liking for it and I prefer not to use it.

To each his own.

M_C

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