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-   -   What Caramel Malts Do You Use In Your Favorite Brown Ale Recipes? (http://www.homebrewtalk.com/f12/what-caramel-malts-do-you-use-your-favorite-brown-ale-recipes-381671/)

Dr_Beersgood_Quaffenstein 01-15-2013 02:21 PM

What Caramel Malts Do You Use In Your Favorite Brown Ale Recipes?
 
I've made a handful of brown ales over the last few years and I am curious about what caramel malt or malts you fellow brewers are using in your brown ale recipes. Do you use just one caramel malt or layer multiple caramel malts for complexity? What are the percentages of caramel malts in your brown ale recipes?

Dr_Beersgood_Quaffenstein 01-16-2013 02:56 PM

Where are all the brown ale fans?

Rake_Rocko 01-16-2013 04:07 PM

I love brown ales! Last one I brewed was my favorite, and a family favorite. I used caramel 40L and 60L. I also sprinkled in some chocolate and munich as well. It was wonderful. I used Glacier hops in my brown, and man is that good! I think that the flavor Glacier brings to the table compliments the caramels soooo well!

adam01 01-16-2013 04:10 PM

10% Caramel 60

Actually a British crystal that is sometimes specd as an EBC 150.

This is for Hobgoblin. See the clone recipe on this site. I think the hops are too much
in that recipe.

Yooper 01-16-2013 04:22 PM

It depends on what kind of brown ale I'm making.

For a mild, I use a combination of 60L and 120L. For a Southern English brown, I'll use 60L or 80L plus the 120L, but in a larger quantity. For Northern English brown ("nut brown"), I"ll use 40L typically, but add some special roast and victory malt.

For my mild, it's usually 8% 60L, and 6% 120L or thereabouts. For the Southern, it's more like 12% 60L (or 80L) and then about 8% 120L. For the drier Northern, i use about 5% 40L.

Thinking about it now, I almost always use special roast in both my Southern and Northern English browns as well as the crystal.

tennesseean_87 01-16-2013 04:39 PM

I like British 85, but amber malt is bangin in a brown. Brown malt would probably be good, too!

MrOH 01-16-2013 06:31 PM

Of the two browns I've brewed (I'm not all that big of a fan of the style, these were brewed with the intention of being gifts), was 1.044OG.
Marris Otter 66%
Malted Oats 9%
Golden nated oats 9%
Amber Malt 5%
Crystal 60L 4%
Pale chocolate 2%
Chocolate 2%
CaraAroma 2%

Substantial mouthfeel, lots of rich toasty and caramel flavors. I might need to revisit this someday.

berley31 01-18-2013 05:55 PM

I brewed a Southern English Brown a while ago (drinking it now) that had 7% each of Crystal 40, 80, and 120 L. It was loosely based on Jamil's recipe, which I had brewed before, but with a bit more Crystal and extra Pale Chocolate.

Notes here: http://meekbrewingco.blogspot.ca/201...-brown-no.html

homebrewdad 01-18-2013 06:00 PM

I personally love this recipe.

7.75 lbs pale ale malt
1.25 lbs crystal 60
1.24 lbs crystal 40
.25 lbs debittered black
.5 lbs rauch malt

1 ounce target hops @ 60 minutes

yeast - WLP037 Yorkshire Square Ale

Dr_Beersgood_Quaffenstein 01-29-2013 07:14 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Yooper (Post 4791812)
It depends on what kind of brown ale I'm making.

For a mild, I use a combination of 60L and 120L. For a Southern English brown, I'll use 60L or 80L plus the 120L, but in a larger quantity. For Northern English brown ("nut brown"), I"ll use 40L typically, but add some special roast and victory malt.

For my mild, it's usually 8% 60L, and 6% 120L or thereabouts. For the Southern, it's more like 12% 60L (or 80L) and then about 8% 120L. For the drier Northern, i use about 5% 40L.

Thinking about it now, I almost always use special roast in both my Southern and Northern English browns as well as the crystal.

I tend to use a combination of 60L and 120L as well, but I am still fooling with my percentages in the recipe i've been playing with for a while. What does the special roast bring to the party?


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