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Old 04-14-2011, 05:40 AM   #1
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Default Vienna/cascade SMaSH

I'm still relatively new to homebrewing (this will be batch 5) and I recently discovered this awesome smash idea. I couldn't find any solid recipe on here, so estimating from other recipes I plan to use:
10-15lbs Vienna malt
3-4oz Cascade pellets

How's this rough recipe sound? I plan on using the continuous hopping technique from Yoopers dfh 60 min clone.

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Old 04-14-2011, 12:41 PM   #2
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It all depends on how strong/bitter you want your SMaSH to be. Assuming 70% efficiency 10 lbs would put you at pale ale strength while 15 lbs would put you up close to low double IPA strength. 3-4 oz is about right for the low end of that range, I’d use more like 5-6 if you aim for the high end.

I’m not a big fan of continuous hopping since it wastes (in my view) a lot of hops in the middle of the boil. For hoppy beers I tend to skip mid-boil addition and go with just an early bittering addition followed by a big dose at the end of the boil (then dry hop).

Sounds like a good combination, hope it turns out well. Welcome to the board.

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Old 04-14-2011, 03:19 PM   #3
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Thanks! This is also going to be my first all grain brew. I've read up plenty on the correct process, but I'm still in the dark on how efficiency is calculated

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Old 04-14-2011, 03:27 PM   #4
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Ps, this board is awesome!!!

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Old 04-14-2011, 03:56 PM   #5
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Efficiency is just the percent of the sugars that you extract compared to the "ideal" mash. Some people talk about mash efficiency which is pre-boil, others talk about system efficiency which is measured based on what you get into the fermenter (including losses to hops, and transfers).

Vienna give about .037 per pound per gallon ideally. To do math with specific gravity you need to drop to 1 (part of the reason many brewers work in plato). If you have 10 lbs the maximum gravity contribution you could get in one gallon is .037*10 = .37. Divide this by the total volume you are making, say 5 gallons, to get the maximum original gravity .074. Let’s say you brew and get a measured gravity of 1.050, divide that by the maximum to get the efficiency .050/.074 = 68%. Learning to predict your efficiency for a given beer is important because it lets you know how much grain to use to hit your target gravity

Brewing software like Beersmith or Promash can do this for you, but understanding the concept is still valuable.

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Old 04-14-2011, 05:04 PM   #6
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Ok. So. . .

12lbs Vienna
2oz cascade 60 min
.5 oz cascade 30 min
2.5 oz cascade 10 min
2 oz cascade dry hop 7 days

Is that enough hops for the dry addition to make a nice hoppy impact?

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Old 04-14-2011, 05:11 PM   #7
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Looks good to me (although I'd move the 30 min addition to 60 and hte 10 min additions to 0).

Hope it turns out well.

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Old 04-14-2011, 07:00 PM   #8
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Vienna/Cascade makes an excellent SMaSH...do it.

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Old 04-15-2011, 11:52 AM   #9
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I can't remember what the technique is called, but I read about taking the first rubbings off the mash and boiling them down to caramelization then adding it back to the wort. How much of the rubbings should I do this with? Is it worth the extra effort?

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Old 04-15-2011, 11:53 AM   #10
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Quote:
Originally Posted by 502Brew
... taking the first rubbings off the mash ....
And by rubbings I mean runnings
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