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Old 06-16-2008, 12:24 PM   #1
ChuckMoney
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Default Unclassifiable Recipe.

Well, I was digging through a friend's experimental recipes, and found a recipe for a 5 gallon extract batch that I can't even start to classify what it might be. Maybe you guys can put a name on it, I brewed it because other than the Special B and Columbus I had the rest of the stuff lying around.

6# Light Liquid Malt Extract (Late Extract Addition 10 min)
1# Special B
1# Wheat Malt
1# Light DME
2# Light Brown Sugar (10 min)
1 oz Columbus (60 min)
1 oz Cascade (25 min)
1 oz Saaz (5 minutes)
American Ale Yeast



I put it into beersmith, got starting gravity of 1.072, so I pitched a half liter starter of some whitelabs east coast ale that I had laying around last wednesday.

I used 12.2 AA Columbus, 5.5 Cascade, and 5.3 Saaz, so I'm at 23.7 IBU according to beersmith. Boiled it up, hit 1.069 on the SG, pitched the .5 liter starter at around 72 degrees, hooked up the blow off tube and it was off to the races from there. Brewed it on Friday night and It hasn't stopped bubbling or pushing krausen through the blowoff for the past 48hrs. After looking around to see what the special B is used for (mainly dubbels and other belgians)

Beersmith description: "Extreme caramel aroma and flavored malt. Used in dark Belgian Abbey and Trappist ales. Unique flavor and aroma."


If any of you could help me put a classification on this recipe, other than it will be a decently sweet dark beer with a high alcohol content. I really have no idea what this will be like. I know the hops arent very balanced, but right now the hop smell seems to dominate the fermentation.

The closest thing on beersmith that I could find was between 8C English Special/Strong Bitter or 10C American Brown Ale

I still dont understand why the wheat malt is in this recipe.

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Old 06-16-2008, 12:53 PM   #2
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I think you're closest to an American Amber. It's a bit strong and dark for that style, but it's neither an ESB nor a Brown Ale.

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Old 06-16-2008, 01:30 PM   #3
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That's no style I know. Many beers defy classification, and that's fine. We don't have to put a style label on everything.


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Old 06-16-2008, 01:39 PM   #4
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Yuri_Rage View Post
I think you're closest to an American Amber. It's a bit strong and dark for that style, but it's neither an ESB nor a Brown Ale.
ok.

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That's no style I know. Many beers defy classification, and that's fine. We don't have to put a style label on everything.


TL
I guess your right, I just would like to know how he came up with this recipe.
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Old 06-16-2008, 01:46 PM   #5
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ChuckMoney View Post
I guess your right, I just would like to know how he came up with this recipe.
Probably the same way I come up with a bunch of my recipes. "I bet that would be good."


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Old 06-16-2008, 03:43 PM   #6
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It says on northern brewer not to use more than 1/4 lb per 5 gallon batch. Is there any particular reason for this?

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Old 06-16-2008, 04:15 PM   #7
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ChuckMoney View Post
It says on northern brewer not to use more than 1/4 lb per 5 gallon batch. Is there any particular reason for this?
If your talking about the Special B, I have no idea why they would put such a cautionary statement out like that. I use a pound and a half in 5 gal of my Irish Honey Red. I love the special B myself. Stone uses a fair amount of it too.
As with anything, give it a try and pay attention to the character it imparts. You can then use that info to adjust later or use it specifically in a new recipe.
A little bit of Wheat malt can add a very nice mouthfeel and add some complexity to the malt profile without adding any real color or caramel.
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Old 06-16-2008, 04:42 PM   #8
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I was talking about the Special B. I tend to like it myself, but the guy working the local homebrew store said that it was going to be out of stock for a few weeks back in april, so I bought 10lbs and try to use it sparingly. Honestly this is the first recipe that has ever called for more than a half pound, so i was kind of timid adding it.

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Old 06-16-2008, 04:59 PM   #9
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I've seen some claims that large amounts of Special B can give a beer a sweet plum flavor.

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Old 06-16-2008, 07:33 PM   #10
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ChuckMoney View Post
I was talking about the Special B. I tend to like it myself, but the guy working the local homebrew store said that it was going to be out of stock for a few weeks back in april, so I bought 10lbs and try to use it sparingly. Honestly this is the first recipe that has ever called for more than a half pound, so i was kind of timid adding it.
I just used a pound of it in a Belgian Strong Ale I just did. Tastes fine so far.

Don't be afraid of the B. . . .

Cheers,
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