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Old 02-09-2006, 01:03 PM   #1
bobbyc
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Default Turbinado Sugar

Anyone here using Turbinado sugar in their recipies? I know a couple people have made reference to it in past posts. I was looking into adding some for an upcoming Barleywine recipe. At the grocery store, I noticed the Turbinado bag of sugar was 3.99 for 1 1/2 lbs. I then noticed "Sugar in the Raw" for a bit cheaper, but 2 lbs, and it appears to be the same thing. Any differences? Anyone using this stuff?

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Old 02-09-2006, 01:19 PM   #2
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I used a box of the "Sugar in the Raw" stuff in my recent Tripel. Tastes great so far

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Old 02-09-2006, 03:04 PM   #3
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Sugar In The Raw is a brand name for Hawaiian Turbinado Sugar

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Old 02-09-2006, 03:14 PM   #4
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What is Turbinado sugar, and what do you use it for? Priming?

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Old 02-09-2006, 03:26 PM   #5
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Onedon
What is Turbinado sugar, and what do you use it for? Priming?
Turbinado sugar is sugar that has not been refined to the stage of being white table sugar. It has some flavor (a nice flavor IMHO), as opposed to just being sweet. It is slightly brown in color. It is not the same as "brown sugar." Brown sugar is refined white sugar with molasses added.
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Old 02-09-2006, 03:33 PM   #6
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Quote:
Originally Posted by The Councilman
Turbinado sugar is sugar that has not been refined to the stage of being white table sugar. It has some flavor (a nice flavor IMHO), as opposed to just being sweet. It is slightly brown in color. It is not the same as "brown sugar." Brown sugar is refined white sugar with molasses added.
This is something that has always confused me.

Molasses comes from sugar cane. They boil the sugar cane, and this produces Turbinado sugar if you dry it out (if I understand correctly). Instead of drying it to make turbinado sugar, they separate the pure sugar from the impurities, and call the impurities "molasses".

Then, for some reason, they mix the pure sugar and molasses back together and call it brown sugar.

So... are you certain that tubinado sugar and brown sugar as not the same thing once they are dissolved in wort? Both consist of cane sugar and the impurities found in sugar cane; One of them was simply separated and then recombined, the other was never separated.

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Old 02-09-2006, 03:40 PM   #7
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I'd imagine it would have some similar properties, but molasses does go through some processing (treated with sulfur, possible more?), so I'm not so sure the end product similar.

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Old 02-09-2006, 03:44 PM   #8
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makes sense.

just to be clear; I wasn't arguing that they were the same... I've just never understood what the actual difference is and was hoping someone could clear it up for me.

Treating it with sulphur and further processing it would certainly change the properties, so I'm willing to accept the turbinado sugar is != brown sugar.

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Old 02-09-2006, 03:47 PM   #9
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Hmmm. from the wikipedia....

White sugar is the result of removing the molasses from Turbinado sugar, and brown sugar is the result of adding molasses to white sugar. Turbinado sugar is similar in appearance to brown sugar but paler, and in general the two can be exchanged freely in recipes.

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Old 02-09-2006, 03:57 PM   #10
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Hmmm, so it would seem that molasses is simple more concentrated, perhaps making turbinado the subtler of the two(?)

I read you, just trying to stumble through the answer

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