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Old 07-10-2013, 09:39 AM   #1
LittleBroBrews
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Thinking of brewing a blonde soon and was looking for some feedback on this before I put it down.

5 gallon brew.

Grain:
3.50kg Pilsner Malt
1.50kg Vienna Malt
0.30kg Melanoidin Malt
0.60kg Cara-Pils

Hops:
20g Styrian Goldings @Mash
30g Saaz @Mash
30g Styrian Goldings @60min
20g Saaz @10min

Yeast:
Wyeast Belgian Abbey Ale II 1762

What do people think of this and if you think something needs to be changed what would you change to improve this beer?

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Old 07-10-2013, 01:51 PM   #2
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I think most people will tell you to add some simple sugar to dry things out, especially when adding some specialty grains. I don't know the conversion to standard weights off the top of my head, but you might also want to reduce your hop character a bit. Blondes tend to be pretty simple, with yeast and pils driving the flavor. I like the idea of a little character malt though.

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Old 07-10-2013, 01:59 PM   #3
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You also might do some reading about your yeast. I haven't used 1762 but I do remember reading that its prone to fusels. So check on the proper temp and make sure to pitch a healthy amount.

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Old 07-10-2013, 09:56 PM   #4
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Thanks for the input. I was planning on using corn sugars for carb, dumping the sugar into a bottling bucket.

Should I use some sugars in the mash as well?

The yeast likes a temp around 22 degrees which I think I can achieve easy enough. Do you think there is any special attention that I need to pay to this yeast strain? I was planning on pitching 3packets with no starter as I don't have time to do a starter.

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Old 07-10-2013, 10:40 PM   #5
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Punch your volume and specific gravity into this calc and it will tell you the proper amount:

http://www.brewersfriend.com/yeast-p...er-calculator/

As for fusels, you can check out this thread:

http://www.homebrewtalk.com/f163/wye...lcohol-323599/

Although dont let it get you too worried. There are lots of people who really like the strain. You just have to be careful to ot let it get too hot. Remember that your beer temp can get 5-10 degrees F hotter than the ambient temp due to the heat of fermentation.

In general, pitch rate and temp are the big fusel predictors. If you pay attention to those you should be good to go.

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Old 07-11-2013, 12:39 AM   #6
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If you already have the yeast, then ok. Try to swamp-cool your temps to around 20 the first couple days; you can let it free-rise after that. But if you haven't bought it yet, I would advise you to switch to WY3522/WLP550 or WY3787/WLP530. Those yeasts are more high-temp friendly and, to my palate, much tastier. The rest of the recipe looks fine.

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Old 07-11-2013, 10:03 AM   #7
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Quote:
Originally Posted by kingwood-kid
If you already have the yeast, then ok. Try to swamp-cool your temps to around 20 the first couple days; you can let it free-rise after that. But if you haven't bought it yet, I would advise you to switch to WY3522/WLP550 or WY3787/WLP530. Those yeasts are more high-temp friendly and, to my palate, much tastier. The rest of the recipe looks fine.
I don't have the yeast yet, but I think I will look into your advice! Thank you.

Sorry Newb question what do you mean by swamp cool?
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Old 07-11-2013, 04:50 PM   #8
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Swamp cooling is putting your fermenter inside a larger container of water and adding some frozen water bottles. If you change the bottles a couple times a day, you can easily keep your wort 10 degrees cooler than the room. Even without the ice bottles, the water will serve as a heat sink to absorb the extra heat created by the yeast during fermentation, which can easily raise the temps by 5 degrees. There's also a method involving a wet t-shirt and a fan that I have never tried. If you use the search function, you can get detailed descriptions of both these methods.

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Old 07-11-2013, 04:50 PM   #9
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If you can get a big plastic tub, you can submerge your carboy/bucket in water. This helps maintain steady temps as the water absorbs heat better than air. Then if you put a t-shirt over it and aim a fan at it, the water will wick up the t-shirt and evaporate. The evaporation cools your carboy. You can also add bottles of ice water if needed.

As for the sugar, a lot of belgian recipes replace some base malt with simple sugar. Since sugar ferments out completely, it dries out the beer, giving it a lighter body. This mostly applies to high ABV beers that can end up too sweet. If your sg is below 1.060 you can probably brew the recipe as is.

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Old 07-11-2013, 11:15 PM   #10
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So if I have built a heat controlled fermentation chamber that mean I would not have to swamp cool the fermenter is that right?

So just running the numbers the OG works out to be 1.073 so you think you should add some corn sugar or just normal table sugar? How much should I add? And do I add it at the mash? The boil? Or direct into primary?

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