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Old 12-24-2010, 02:23 AM   #31
rnrchemnerd
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Hello Again

The most common hop of the day was probably a cascade. The yeast? well that's anyone's guess. I think just plain old yeast was probably used the most as there were probably no sophisticated suppliers of yeast in those days. I could be wrong as I sometimes am but if I wanted to make beer then with what was available at the time it would be either yeast for leavening bread or the use of wild yeast from plants leaves such as grape vine leafs and such. The problem with using grapevine leafs would be getting the good yeasts to take over before any bad microbes could foul the brew. Than again not having any real good technical info from that time period makes a lot of what I am saying pure speculation.
Ummmnnn....No. Cascades were developed in a cross breeding program in the 80's (or maybe it was the 70's, but I'm pretty sure it was at oregon state), regardless, they are a relatively modern variety. I think what you may be referring to are Cluster hops, which are the first hops cultivated in North America. Also, brewers yeast was a known commodity in colonial times and was in fact brought over from the "old world" for the specific purpose of beer. Picture if you will all those casks of beer brought over on the Mayflower with all of that residual yeast at the bottom of the casks. The pilgrims may not have understood modern germ theory, but they damn well knew that the dregs of those casks were what started their beer.

On a different note, I think a wheat and molasses ale sounds quite tasty right now, especially if you throw in some (modern) chocolate malt. Mmmmnnn porter....


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Old 12-24-2010, 11:08 AM   #32
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Quote:
Originally Posted by rnrchemnerd View Post
Ummmnnn....No. Cascades were developed in a cross breeding program in the 80's (or maybe it was the 70's, but I'm pretty sure it was at oregon state), regardless, they are a relatively modern variety. I think what you may be referring to are Cluster hops, which are the first hops cultivated in North America. Also, brewers yeast was a known commodity in colonial times and was in fact brought over from the "old world" for the specific purpose of beer. Picture if you will all those casks of beer brought over on the Mayflower with all of that residual yeast at the bottom of the casks. The pilgrims may not have understood modern germ theory, but they damn well knew that the dregs of those casks were what started their beer.

On a different note, I think a wheat and molasses ale sounds quite tasty right now, especially if you throw in some (modern) chocolate malt. Mmmmnnn porter....


You see, like I said earlier I'm not always correct nor do I know everything about beer but it's good that someone here does.


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Old 12-24-2010, 02:05 PM   #33
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Thanks for the tips, guys!....can't believe I didn't think of the yeast coming over with the Pilgrims (and, throughout, everyone else who needed to drink something during their voyages to the New World). So the question becomes one of who populated what parts of the colonies. English folks in New England and the plantation economies, with pockets of Germans and Dutch, I believe, in the mid-Atlantic colonies. So, adding it all up, we're probably looking at a combination of wheat grain/LME, molasses, Cluster hops, and some basic English ale yeast. That oughta take the edge out of New England's winter in the 21st century or the 18th.

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Old 12-24-2010, 11:11 PM   #34
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theres a local brewpub here in CA that makes a thomas jefferson ale for 4th of july every year. heres his description of it.

The English brewer I trained under found a book on Monticello w purchase orders listing ingredients needed for brewing on site. It included barley AND wheat (it's got around 33% wheat malt). He essentially speculated what a colonial beer would have been like based on the purchase orders. He knew Jefferson had an English brewer (obviously single step infusion mash) and beers were often darker and stronger.

We use East Kent Golding bc it's the only British hop still in use today that may have been used back then. More than likely they were using hops from NY.

Base malt is Maris Otter. Also has crystal 60, wheat, and a bit of carafa 3

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Old 12-25-2010, 12:58 AM   #35
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ok has ANYONE done the "chicken beer"? that sounds crazy but you never know might be good. kudos to the first homebrewer to attempt it

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Old 02-19-2011, 08:23 PM   #36
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i thought i read someone where that the Small Beer recipe yeilds a low alcohol beer that was probably drank daily.

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Old 07-31-2011, 08:19 PM   #37
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Quote:
Originally Posted by kdsarch View Post
I found a recipe for an ale that was brewed by Thomas Jefferson.

8 lbs pale malt
4 lbs wheat
1 lb molasses

1 1/2 oz east kent goldings 60 min
1/2 oz east kent goldings 10 minutes
american ale yeast

Anyone ever brew something like this? Any comments as to what this might taste like? I might give this one a go, but am surprised to see so much wheat, and the molasses.

Interested in anyone's thoughts.
just brewed it.
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primary-thomas jefferson ale, cali common, mild ale
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Old 02-17-2012, 01:40 AM   #38
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I kind of forgot about this thread. For you guts that brewed it, how did it turn out?

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Old 05-17-2013, 04:10 PM   #39
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A definite "gotta brew."

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Old 06-03-2013, 12:08 PM   #40
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I am brewing this today will let you know how it turns out!!!



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