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Old 09-17-2009, 07:02 PM   #21
Mr-Bert
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Default George Washingtons EXTRA Stout porter

I brewed a batch figuring what you would need in Molasses and made a small batch of the very extra stout ale and it rocked my world!!!

1 Quart Black strap

5 lbs 6 row Briess

Single mash 6 row at 155 deg F for 60 minutes. Sparge off mash to 2.5 gallons of wert add 1 quart black strap bring to boil add hops I used cascades for bittering and wilimettes for finishing after about 1 hour slow boil topped up with fresh water to 3 gallons wert. Before pitching yeast the wert had a completed potential of 7.5 percent alc. I only make small batches of this very stout beer and let it set for two or three weeks after charging and bottling before drinking. This style of ale is not for the average beer drinker it is a very stout ass kicker.
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Old 01-09-2010, 09:08 PM   #22
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Mr-Bert View Post
I brewed a batch figuring what you would need in Molasses and made a small batch of the very extra stout ale and it rocked my world!!!

1 Quart Black strap

5 lbs 6 row Briess

Single mash 6 row at 155 deg F for 60 minutes. Sparge off mash to 2.5 gallons of wert add 1 quart black strap bring to boil add hops I used cascades for bittering and wilimettes for finishing after about 1 hour slow boil topped up with fresh water to 3 gallons wert. Before pitching yeast the wert had a completed potential of 7.5 percent alc. I only make small batches of this very stout beer and let it set for two or three weeks after charging and bottling before drinking. This style of ale is not for the average beer drinker it is a very stout ass kicker.
How much of each hop did you use?
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Old 01-09-2010, 11:04 PM   #23
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As the mighty George recipe states"Hops to taste" to get the taste that I like I use just 1 oz in the 2.5 gallon recipe and I brew like they would have then using just one type of hops lets say cascade use 1/2 oz at start of boil and the other 1/2 oz at the last 15 mins of the boil.
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Old 01-09-2010, 11:11 PM   #24
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Makes sense. Thanks.

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Old 01-09-2010, 11:12 PM   #25
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Remember to top the batch up to three gallons after you start cooling it using fresh water it helps cool the wert and it takes the edge of the brew as well. I use dry coopers ale yeast it ferments in about 24 to 48 hours i let it set for 4 or 5 days and rack it over to set another 4 or 5 for a total of ten then charge it and let it set for 2 weeks at room temp. after that I put it on the cool basement floor and drink it at the basement floor temp which George would have done no refrigerate then probebly and the beer tastes better warmer anyway
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Old 01-09-2010, 11:22 PM   #26
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Oh and every time I drink a bottle I thank god for George Washington the first president commander and chief and this awesome country he liberated from tyranny
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Old 01-09-2010, 11:22 PM   #27
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I call the recipe (THE GENERAL)
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Old 01-10-2010, 01:29 AM   #28
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interesting read.

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Old 12-23-2010, 02:15 PM   #29
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Default Combrune

Has anyone gotten a reasonable adaptation of Combrune's work into modern ingredients? My small apartment sadly limits me to extract brewing. It seems that colonial/revolution-era brews were wheat-heavy and further malted/darkened/sweetened with the readily-available molasses - but what else do we know about the methods and ingredients of that time (other than fermenting a Scottish rooster from a couple hundred years before)? What hops would be appropriate? Are there any Wyeasts or White Labs yeast strains that have that long a lineage?

I've got the Higgins/Kilgore/Hertlein, and they don't seem to ever claim that these were authentic, just likely representatives of the beers of the day. Like Mosher, essentially just informed speculation.

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Old 12-23-2010, 04:40 PM   #30
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Hello Again

The most common hop of the day was probably a cascade. The yeast? well that's anyone's guess. I think just plain old yeast was probably used the most as there were probably no sophisticated suppliers of yeast in those days. I could be wrong as I sometimes am but if I wanted to make beer then with what was available at the time it would be either yeast for leavening bread or the use of wild yeast from plants leaves such as grape vine leafs and such. The problem with using grapevine leafs would be getting the good yeasts to take over before any bad microbes could foul the brew. Than again not having any real good technical info from that time period makes a lot of what I am saying pure speculation.
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