Electric Brewing Supply 30A BCS Giveaway!


Home Brew Forums > Home Brewing Beer > Recipes/Ingredients > Thomas Jefferson Ale
Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools
Old 12-27-2008, 11:45 AM   #11
Bob
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Nov 2007
Location: Christiansted, St Croix, USVI, US Virgin Islands
Posts: 3,921
Liked 127 Times on 95 Posts
Likes Given: 36

Default

A pound of molasses in 5 gallons will definitely have an impact on the beer - a significant impact. My redaction of an 1812 porter recipe called for ~2 lbs molasses in 15 gallons, and it was very significant. I find it pleasant, with buttery notes, a certain residual sweetness, and dark fruit flavors from carmelization.

I find it interesting how all these people can have Thomas Jefferson's ale. You'll notice that all of them are different. Combined with the certain knowledge that Jefferson never had a recipe, it boggles the mind.

The Indian corn recipe sounds exactly like one of Mosher's stunts. It has no basis in history, certainly, but it sounds like an interesting experiment.

Cheers,

Bob

__________________

Brewmaster
Fort Christian Brewpub
St Croix, US Virgin Islands

Bob is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 12-27-2008, 02:28 PM   #12
Revvy
Post Hoc Ergo Propter Hoc
HBT_LIFETIMESUPPORTER.png
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
 
Revvy's Avatar
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Dec 2007
Location: "Detroitish" Michigan
Posts: 40,804
Liked 2747 Times on 1648 Posts
Likes Given: 3485

Default

Alright Bob....so you made 5 gallons of the Mollases Ale...when are you in your search for brewing historical accuracy, going to attempt this...


Quote:
COCK ALE (circa the 1500's) A real recipe from some obscure text found in the Scottish Highlands... Enjoy....
Procedure:
"Take 10 gallons of ale and a large cock, the older the better; parboil the cock, flay him, and stamp him in a stone mortar until his bones are broken (you must gut him when you flaw him). Then, put the cock into two quarts of sack, and put to it five pounds of raisins of the sun - stoned; some blades of mace, and a few cloves. Put all these into a canvas bag, and a little before you find the ale has been working, put the bag and ale together in vessel.

In a week or nine days bottle it up, fill the bottle just above the neck and give it the same time to ripen as other ale."
Alternate recipe:
Brutal, eh? I was also given a modern recipe written by some guy named C.J.J. Berry.... Here goes this one...

"Take a few pieces of _cooked_ chicken and a few chicken bones (approx one tenth of the edible portion of the bird) well crushed or minced.

Also take half of pound of raisins, a very little mace, and one or maybe two cloves. Add all these ingrediants to half a bottle of string country white wine. Soak for 24 hrs. Then make on gallon of beer as follows:

1 lb Malt extract
1 Oz Hops
1/2 lb demerarra sugar
1 gallon water
Yeast and nutrient

Add the whole of the chicken mixture to the beer at the end of the second day. Fermentation will last six or seven days longer than usual and the ale should be matured at least one month in the bottle. This cock ale is of the barley wine type.
__________________

Like my snazzy new avatar? Get Sons of Zymurgy swag, here, and brew with the best.

Revvy's one of the cool reverends. He has a Harley and a t-shirt that says on the back "If you can read this, the bitch was Raptured. - Madman

I gotta tell ya, just between us girls, that Revvy is HOT. Very tall, gorgeous grey hair and a terrific smile. He's very good looking in person, with a charismatic personality... he drives like a ****ing maniac! - YooperBrew

Revvy is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 12-27-2008, 02:39 PM   #13
fratermus
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Feb 2008
Location: 75081
Posts: 1,189
Liked 2 Times on 1 Posts

Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Revvy View Post
Mollasses was considered a brewing adjunct in colonial times, evidently...
Dunno about early colonials times (perhaps still imported from Europe at that time) but during the 18th c. molasses was a close-at-hand byproduct of the sugarcane plantation African slavetrade.
fratermus is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 12-27-2008, 02:50 PM   #14
Revvy
Post Hoc Ergo Propter Hoc
HBT_LIFETIMESUPPORTER.png
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
 
Revvy's Avatar
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Dec 2007
Location: "Detroitish" Michigan
Posts: 40,804
Liked 2747 Times on 1648 Posts
Likes Given: 3485

Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by fratermus View Post
Dunno about early colonials times (perhaps still imported from Europe at that time) but during the 18th c. molasses was a close-at-hand byproduct of the sugarcane plantation African slavetrade.
That's why it was avaliable to the colonials, along with RUM...IIRC it was produced and brought from the carribean
__________________

Like my snazzy new avatar? Get Sons of Zymurgy swag, here, and brew with the best.

Revvy's one of the cool reverends. He has a Harley and a t-shirt that says on the back "If you can read this, the bitch was Raptured. - Madman

I gotta tell ya, just between us girls, that Revvy is HOT. Very tall, gorgeous grey hair and a terrific smile. He's very good looking in person, with a charismatic personality... he drives like a ****ing maniac! - YooperBrew

Revvy is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 12-27-2008, 02:52 PM   #15
fratermus
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Feb 2008
Location: 75081
Posts: 1,189
Liked 2 Times on 1 Posts

Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by NQ3X View Post
I find it interesting how all these people can have Thomas Jefferson's ale. You'll notice that all of them are different. Combined with the certain knowledge that Jefferson never had a recipe, it boggles the mind.
If one wants to get into TJs brewing, it would be useful to read what he was reading on the topic. It appears to be the Palmer of his times:
Theory and Practice of Brewing (etext, pdf, etc) by Combrune.
__________________
Adequate Mousetrap brewhouse

Batch history | yeast slants | Suspending yeast
fratermus is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 12-27-2008, 04:12 PM   #16
Bob
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Nov 2007
Location: Christiansted, St Croix, USVI, US Virgin Islands
Posts: 3,921
Liked 127 Times on 95 Posts
Likes Given: 36

Default

Fratermus,

I have copies from that very source.

Revvy,

There is an interesting story about Fritz Maytag when he first bought Anchor. It involves employees boiling holiday turkeys in the wort, IIRC...

Cheers,

Bob

__________________

Brewmaster
Fort Christian Brewpub
St Croix, US Virgin Islands

Bob is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 12-27-2008, 05:15 PM   #17
MacGruber
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Nov 2008
Posts: 592
Liked 7 Times on 7 Posts
Likes Given: 9

Default

Both the Washington Porter and the Jefferson Ale are actually brewed by a local brewery called Yards right here in Philadelphia, and have just become available at my six pack store. There is also Poor Richard's Spruce Ale available.

__________________
MacGruber is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 12-27-2008, 08:28 PM   #18
Revvy
Post Hoc Ergo Propter Hoc
HBT_LIFETIMESUPPORTER.png
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
 
Revvy's Avatar
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Dec 2007
Location: "Detroitish" Michigan
Posts: 40,804
Liked 2747 Times on 1648 Posts
Likes Given: 3485

Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by NQ3X View Post
Fratermus,

I have copies from that very source.

Revvy,

There is an interesting story about Fritz Maytag when he first bought Anchor. It involves employees boiling holiday turkeys in the wort, IIRC...

Cheers,

Bob
I dare you bro...I dare you.
__________________

Like my snazzy new avatar? Get Sons of Zymurgy swag, here, and brew with the best.

Revvy's one of the cool reverends. He has a Harley and a t-shirt that says on the back "If you can read this, the bitch was Raptured. - Madman

I gotta tell ya, just between us girls, that Revvy is HOT. Very tall, gorgeous grey hair and a terrific smile. He's very good looking in person, with a charismatic personality... he drives like a ****ing maniac! - YooperBrew

Revvy is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 12-28-2008, 01:48 PM   #19
Bob
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Nov 2007
Location: Christiansted, St Croix, USVI, US Virgin Islands
Posts: 3,921
Liked 127 Times on 95 Posts
Likes Given: 36

Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by MacGruber View Post
Both the Washington Porter and the Jefferson Ale are actually brewed by a local brewery called Yards right here in Philadelphia, and have just become available at my six pack store. There is also Poor Richard's Spruce Ale available.
I was around for the debut of both TJA and WP. Both are excellent beers! Plus, I am acquainted with and respect the owners and brewers of Yards. Neither of those beers, however, have any historical basis other than the names, a certain level of knowledge and some advertising claims.

Look - just because it has an historical name and/or the brewery says it's 'historic' doesn't mean it actually is. Historical brewing is a fairly specialized pursuit, first of all, and the result is often so far removed from what we expect in terms of sensory perception that it would be unwise to make an attempt at marketing the product. It really doesn't matter if the label says "Authentic Recipe" - people can tell you anything they like.

Cheers!

Bob
__________________

Brewmaster
Fort Christian Brewpub
St Croix, US Virgin Islands

Bob is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 06-04-2009, 03:14 AM   #20
devildoc5
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Jun 2009
Location: San Diego
Posts: 1
Default

Just wanted to add my two cents into this post for anyone still looking. The book that was inventoried in Jefferson's collection when he died is available here: The London and Country Brewer by Anonymous - Project Gutenberg

It is called the London & County Brewer

__________________
devildoc5 is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Reply



Quick Reply
Message:
Options
Thread Tools


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Nice article on Thomas Jefferson (and wife) as brewers - late 18th/early 19th century neldred General Beer Discussion 13 10-29-2009 04:05 PM
Thomas Hardy Ale BeardedSquash General Beer Discussion 0 09-10-2009 08:45 PM
Thomas Hardy's Ale Beau815 All Grain & Partial Mash Brewing 17 07-07-2009 04:37 PM
Thomas Hardy's Ale Boston Commercial Brew Discussion 3 02-23-2006 06:14 AM
Thomas Hardys justbrewit Commercial Brew Discussion 0 11-04-2005 08:02 PM