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Old 08-06-2009, 07:49 AM   #1
thejerk
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Default Talk to me about Carapils

it's for head-retention, right? Don't almost all styles want good head retention? So why don't we always use it?
Can somebody illuminate for me when this malt is appropriate to use and when it's not, and in what amounts? I've never used it before but always wonder about it because I love head. Who doesn't. I'm brewing a breakfast stout next week and considering adding it to the grain bill due to the reputation coffee and chocolate have for killing head. Also brewing a Belgian abbey at some point and considering either Carapils or a bit of wheat malt for head retention. Thoughts?
Im Voraus vielen Dank,
Andy

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Old 08-06-2009, 10:46 AM   #2
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Carapils provides unfermentable dextrins (it is also known as dextrine malt). So it is not only for head retention, it will also provide a fuller mouthfeel. This is fine in most styles but not appropriate in others.

It does give significant head retention which lingers to the end of the glass.

Wheat is pretty common in Belgian recipes, it would not be out of place. Carapils might not be a great choice, as you are looking for good attenuation in a Belgian abbey ale.

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Old 08-06-2009, 11:45 AM   #3
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http://www.homebrewtalk.com/f12/cara...-barley-99458/
If I was going to brew a Breakfast Stout, I would go w/ the flaked barley myself.
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Old 08-06-2009, 02:48 PM   #4
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Jaybird View Post
http://www.homebrewtalk.com/f12/cara...-barley-99458/
If I was going to brew a Breakfast Stout, I would go w/ the flaked barley myself.
Cheers
Jay
Okay, so on that note, the Breakfast stout has flaked oats as 8% of the grainbill. Same effect, so no flaked barley needed?
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Old 08-07-2009, 03:24 AM   #5
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Quote:
Originally Posted by thejerk View Post
Okay, so on that note, the Breakfast stout has flaked oats as 8% of the grainbill. Same effect, so no flaked barley needed?
Flaked barley and flaked oats are basically the same thing, or at least used to accomplish the same thing. 8% seems about right depending on exactly what you're shooting for. So no no more flaked barley needed.
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Old 08-07-2009, 06:11 AM   #6
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Actually, I think oats have oils that kill head retention. I don't think that they have the same effect as flaked barley with regard to head formation and retention. I read this somewhere so i actually have no experience but I believe adjuncts such as rice, corn, oats, etc are no good for creating good head. Late hop additions help create a sticky head with lacing. Wheat definitely helps with head formation...hope this helps.

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Old 08-07-2009, 01:57 PM   #7
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Hmm. So the Breakfast stout, which contains flaked oats, coffee, and chocolate, is going to be battling a lot of oils. Recipe being discussed here. Would it be feasible to also add in flaked barley or even carapils to this recipe, or what might be a solution? The recipe already calls for about 4% roasted barley malt, I don't know if that's relevant or not.

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Old 08-07-2009, 04:46 PM   #8
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Yea you are right...lots of those pesky oils. They do provide good mouthfeel though. I've found that flaked wheat is great to increase both head formation and retention. But I've heard both flaked barley and rye can help too. Don't forget about the carbonation...stouts typically aren't heavily carbonated. Carapils honestly may not be a bad idea either because as Jaybird mentioned, it helps the foam linger. A small amount of each shouldn't impart any noticeable flavor as the dark malts should dominate. An increase in mouthfeel fits the stout style too so that should be appropriate. Good luck!

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Old 08-07-2009, 08:06 PM   #9
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You might want to try a cold break before you pitch too, and let the oils float to the top and draw the wort out from under the top layer with the excess oil.

I've mostly used Cara-pils in Belgian's and double IPA's, and it helps to add head retention.

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Old 10-18-2009, 05:21 PM   #10
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Do I need to mash the carapils or can I just steep if adding to an extract batch for head retention? Not sure if the conversion process is needed and would shorten my brewday a bit if I don't have to do that - it's the only grain in this recipe.

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