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Home Brew Forums > Home Brewing Beer > Recipes/Ingredients > Substitute for Wyeast 1007 - German Ale
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Old 12-22-2007, 05:00 PM   #1
ctkevin
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Default Substitute for Wyeast 1007 - German Ale

I'll be brewing up a 10 gallon batch of a Otter Creek Copper Ale clone next week. I have a packet of Wyeast 1007 for half but I was thinking of putting a packet of Nottingham or a packet of S-04 for the other half. I'm trying to educate myself on how using different yeasts will change the taste of my beer. Would either of these be okay to use, or do you think I'll be left with 5 gallons of undrinkable beer?

Thanks

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Old 12-22-2007, 05:08 PM   #2
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You'll be fine, a good idea to do experiments like that. You should be sure to share you results with us!

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Old 12-22-2007, 07:45 PM   #3
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Using different yeasts for most beers is not going to make a beer undrinkable so I think it is great to experiment. A few problems may come about if you are making a style that gets alot of character from the yeast and you use a clean yeast, or vise versa. Even in those cases you may get something good. For instance the American wheat beer is often pretty close to heffeweizen recipe but with a clean American ale yeast.
Experiment you may find something new you really like. I am considering at some point makeing a strong stout with a Belgian yeast strain.
Craig

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Old 12-23-2007, 12:07 AM   #4
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Agreed. Try different experiments to determine what the various strains of yeast will bring to your beer. You will not have undrinkable beer in any case. I haven't used the dry strains you mention and don't know if they are equivalent to 1007, but at most, they will add a different flavor profile to your beer that 1007 won't add.

I have made a strong stout with a Belgian strain (Wyeast 1388) and I was not disappointed. Here is the recipe, as in Beer Captured (I omitted the corn sugar (1#) and added more malt):

OG=1.087-1.089
FG=1.017-1.018
SRM=100+
IBU=23
ABV=9%

10 oz Torrified wheat
8 oz chocolate malt
8 oz roasted
1.25 # amber candi sugar (I used dark and it was even better)
14# pilsner (used pale ale malt)
2 oz East Kent Goldings (bittering)
1/2 oz East Kent Goldings (flavor)
2 tsp steamed untoasted oak chips (when racked to secondary)

I let it age for about 6 months and it was fantastic.

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Old 03-04-2008, 04:03 AM   #5
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Quote:
Originally Posted by uwmgdman
You'll be fine, a good idea to do experiments like that. You should be sure to share you results with us!
Currently drinking the recipe I posted about. There was defiantly a difference between the 2 parts of the batch. However to be fair, I put the dry yeast into a keg, and the liquid yeast into bottles. However I don't think this did much, if anything to the taste.

Both beers taste great. The dry yeast finished .002 points lower then the liquid. The difference was the dry yeast had a much more maltier taste.

-Kevin
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Old 03-04-2008, 02:14 PM   #6
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Thanks for following up! Enjoy the beer! What dry yeast did you end up using?

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Old 03-19-2008, 01:31 AM   #7
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Because of its popularity on this board I decided to use Nottingham. I've had lots of luck with that yeast in several other batches as well. Can't beat the price!

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