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Old 01-12-2010, 04:50 AM   #1
chemman14
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Default substitute CARAFA 2, 200L WEYERMANN for pale chocolate malt?

I want to brew the old monster barley wine from brewing classic styles and it calls for .25 lb of pale chocolate malt. My LHBS doesnt carry pale chocolate malt but they carry a product called CARAFA 2, 200L WEYERMANN. The description is as follows from their website.
CARAFA 2, 200L WEYERMANN. The darkest German coloring grain. Adds the dark, dry flavor of Schwartzbier. A little to darken festbiers. De-husked, non-bittering.
Could I just substitute this for pale chocolate malt?

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Old 01-12-2010, 11:17 AM   #2
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Carafa is german chocolate malt. Carafa II was in the 420L range, not 200L.

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Old 01-12-2010, 12:02 PM   #3
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Actually it is more like a smooth Black Patent. It is not a chocolate malt.

Forrest

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Old 01-12-2010, 12:52 PM   #4
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Actually it is more like a smooth Black Patent. It is not a chocolate malt.

Forrest
Weyermann calls it 'Chocolate Roasted Malt' on their website so that's prob why it's commonly referred to as a chocolate malt. I've never used enough to really tell (I've only used an ounce or two for color). Maybe I should try it in a Porter if it's more similar to Black Patent.
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Old 01-12-2010, 12:59 PM   #5
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It really doesn't taste like chocolate malt, no matter what Weyermann says. I would use it in a recipe that calls for Black Patent but you want the flavor to be smother and less astringent.

Forrest

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Old 01-12-2010, 01:01 PM   #6
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Get the pale chocolate online, there is no substitute for it.

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Old 01-12-2010, 01:37 PM   #7
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Get the pale chocolate online, there is no substitute for it.
What is the difference between it and regular chocolate malt (other than the Lovibond rating)? I just got a pound to try out and was gonna use it (exclusively as far as dark roasted grains) in an Northern English Brown.
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Old 01-12-2010, 04:22 PM   #8
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ok, I will just order the pale chocolate malt and throw in the 1/4 lb with my other specialty grains in the mill at the LHBS. Hopefully they wont mind

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Old 01-12-2010, 06:40 PM   #9
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ok, I will just order the pale chocolate malt and throw in the 1/4 lb with my other specialty grains in the mill at the LHBS. Hopefully they wont mind
I've heard jamilz say a similar thing remilard did, that there is no substitute. Maybe if you mention that there is no substitute they'll start to carry it.
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Old 01-12-2010, 06:48 PM   #10
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Quote:
Originally Posted by SpanishCastleAle View Post
What is the difference between it and regular chocolate malt (other than the Lovibond rating)? I just got a pound to try out and was gonna use it (exclusively as far as dark roasted grains) in an Northern English Brown.
It is less roasted/harsh and more chocolaty.

If you do something like a Northern Brown with like half a pound of it per 5 gallons, you basically can't make that beer without it. You could use half as much regular chocolate but it will be less chocolaty and more roasty (though at 4 oz per 5 gallons, not very roasty).

I also use it a lot in beers where I will use regular chocolate anyway, because I can push the total amount of chocolate malt and character higher without risking an objectionably flavor by using even parts of both.
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