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Old 01-28-2014, 03:38 PM   #1
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Default Starch Conversion for Quick Grits

I'm doing a Kentucky Common with 23% Corn Grits on the grain bill. I am concerned about whether or not the 70% mix of pale 2-row will be enough for adequate starch conversion. I've read that "quick" grits do not need to be cooked first also...is that true or do I need to cook them first to gelatinize the starches?

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Old 01-28-2014, 03:50 PM   #2
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US 2row is approximately 140 lintner (diastatic power). They say that 35L is considered self-converting, therefore 140-35=105; 105/35=3; so 1 lb 2row can theoretically convert itself plus 3 lbs of adjunct. Keep in mind that 35 is just barely self-converting so it will take longer to convert with fewer enzymes when near the bottom of the require enzymes for conversion. As long as you keep a nice buffer you should have no problem converting in reasonable time. By that, I simply mean use a rule of thumb of 1 lb us 2row can convert 2 lbs adjunct, and you should always be fine.

As an example, I brewed a cream ale using ~28% instant grits and had no problem with complete conversion within 60 minutes at 152F. I maybe should have given myself a little extra time (75min total) as a safeguard to ensure full conversion, but in the end it all worked out great.

Quick grits do not need to be cooked first, correct. They are equivalent to flaked corn in their mashing qualities; add at mash time and proceed as normal.

In terms of flavor contribution to beer, they are very different than flaked corn (in my experience). I have found them to have a VERY mild corn flavor to them, and a little less corn sweetness. I actually get more corn flavor in 1 lb of flaked corn than 2.5 lbs of quick grits. This isn't a good or bad thing; just something to be aware of. Otherwise, I really enjoyed using the quick grits and will probably find some additional uses for them in the future.

Have fun with your brewday!!

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Old 01-28-2014, 05:26 PM   #3
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Awesome! Thanks for the info it is really helpful. I should be getting all of my grains in this week and brewing this weekend. What would be your recommended mash time for this grain bill assuming a strike temp of 167 and a mash temp of 153? I also plan to fly sparge at 170.

Small Batch
2lbs Pale 2-row
1lb Corn Grits
4oz Black Patent
4oz German Acidulated

Also, I am using the Acidulated malt in place of a sour mash for this beer. Will the lowered PH affect my efficiency?

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Old 01-28-2014, 05:37 PM   #4
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I don't think you'd have any trouble with full conversion within 60 minutes with that grainbill and temperature. That's what I would shoot for if I were brewing that beer.

That's an unusual recipe for sure. I can't quite place it . If it's 1 gallon then that's a fair amount of black patent for one gallon - it would be really portery.

I haven't played with sour mashes yet, but have used acidulated malt a few times. I don't think you'll get the same sour character from acidulated as you would from a sour mash. IIRC, a sour mash will yield a somewhat-to-fairly sour beer depending on how much you let the lactobacilli act on the grain. I suspect from the acidulated malt you'll get more of a tangy acid bite as opposed to sour flavor. I may be wrong but that's just my impression.

It looks like a fun experimental beer regardless. I'd love to hear how it works out. Where did you get the inspiration for this recipe?

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Old 01-28-2014, 05:48 PM   #5
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I didn't specify, it's actually a 2 gallon recipe. I got the original recipe from here on the thread and tweaked it a bit. Being from Kentucky (and a History nerd) I wanted to try and re-create the Kentucky Common Beer while adding a unique take on it.

The original recipe called for all of the same except he used flaked rye in place of the acidulated malt to add a "sourness." I was tossing around using black barley instead of patent just for flavor purposes, but I'm sticking with patent because I buy by the pound, but use by the ounce...thus I've got a lot laying around!

Traditionally these were believed to be sour mashed, however many sources cite this being incorrect and just an association with sour mash whiskey prevalent in the region. To be honest, I haven't found a single definitive process for making a KY Common! Just bits and pieces here and there. Who knows?? I'm gonna brew it up this weekend and let it sit on some 1272 for 3 weeks and see what happens I guess! Will report back!

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Old 01-28-2014, 05:52 PM   #6
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Quote:
Originally Posted by wildactbrewer View Post
I didn't specify, it's actually a 2 gallon recipe. I got the original recipe from here on the thread and tweaked it a bit. Being from Kentucky (and a History nerd) I wanted to try and re-create the Kentucky Common Beer while adding a unique take on it.

The original recipe called for all of the same except he used flaked rye in place of the acidulated malt to add a "sourness." I was tossing around using black barley instead of patent just for flavor purposes, but I'm sticking with patent because I buy by the pound, but use by the ounce...thus I've got a lot laying around!

Traditionally these were believed to be sour mashed, however many sources cite this being incorrect and just an association with sour mash whiskey prevalent in the region. To be honest, I haven't found a single definitive process for making a KY Common! Just bits and pieces here and there. Who knows?? I'm gonna brew it up this weekend and let it sit on some 1272 for 3 weeks and see what happens I guess! Will report back!
Very good info and very intriguing. I look forward to how this works out. AND, you've inspired me to look into (the historical and near-extinct) Kentucky common style

Cheers
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Old 01-28-2014, 06:02 PM   #7
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en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Kentucky_Common_Beer

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Old 01-28-2014, 06:44 PM   #8
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Thanks for the link wildact. I had just barely finished reading the wikipedia when you replied.

I also came across this thread of great interest, particularly post #5 from Jeff Renner. Wow - the guy is a wealth of knowledge.
http://www.straightbourbon.com/forum...ky-Common-Beer

Additionally, I found a link to the book mention in the first post of the thread from google books and it's a free PDF download. If you're interested you can snag it from here and page 818 gives the description of KCB (I haven't read it myself yet):
http://books.google.com/books/about/...d=ppYKAAAAMAAJ

(left-hand side you can find the 'EBOOK-Free' link)

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Old 02-04-2014, 02:23 PM   #9
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UPDATE: I brewed this up last Saturday. Had a few bumps along the way however...I didn't account for the loss due to boil-off(I know, rookie mistake) so I had to add water on the back end to get my OG down to where I wanted it. It came out at 1.060 which is right around where I was shooting.

Secondly, I used a new-to-me hop called Zythos(9.7)...given the chance I wouldn't use it again. While it's a GREAT all around hop for IPAs and such, the flavor is a bit pungent now that its in the primary. Not bad! Just not what I was looking for. Probably go with Cascade or Amarillo next time.

Overall, I'm still happy with it. My recovered Wyeast 1272 did well in a .5L Starter and took off like a rocket in the primary. It's smells wonderful all be it a little hoppy for my liking. I think this will mellow out thought. I let you know how it tastes!

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Old 02-17-2014, 02:20 PM   #10
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Update:

Finally got to taste one of these. Overall I am pleased with this one! It came out a little darker than I had planned, more like a 25srm rather than a 14. The bitterness is spot on with a light floral note from the hops. The tartness that I expected from the acidulated malt did not come through at all, maybe a higher percentage next time.

It has great body and holds a wonderful thick head. I shot for 2.4 when I primed. I used knox gelatin to clear and cold crash but still ended up with a little chill haze.

The worst part about recreating a "dead" style is no one is around to really define the style. Thus I have no idea what I created...All I know is that I like it and everyone so far has liked it so I call it a winner!

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