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Old 05-06-2009, 10:29 PM   #1
shaundesjardins
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Default Simple but tasty extract amber ale recipe?

Hi everyone. I'm looking for a pretty straight forward amber ale recipe kinda like Rogues American amber.
Any ideas?
Thanks!

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Old 05-07-2009, 12:51 AM   #2
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See my entry on American Amber Ale on the Wiki. Should give you enough to build your own recipe!

I like a mix of Crystal malts: 40, 90 and 120L, weighted toward the 40. Use your favorite brewing software to come up with the percentages listed in the article.

I also like the midrange of the IBUs, with a nice smack of hops in the flavor/aroma.

Cheers,

Bob

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Old 05-07-2009, 12:53 AM   #3
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I don't agree with what you say about the hops, nor does the BJCP. Other than that nice article.

If you use Briess Amber LME you already have Crystal 60L (and some Munich malt.) Steep 8oz Crystal 40L and 4 oz 80L (or 120L) and your there. An once or two of Roasted Barley is good too.

Something like this
http://hopville.com/recipe/60014/ame...s/simple-amber

The style has a great deal of freedom. Any hop and just about any malt are fair game. There is a comercial beer brewed here that tastes like it's mostly Melanoidin Malt and Argentine Cascades.
http://www.zioncanyonbrewingcompany....leAmberAle.htm

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Old 05-07-2009, 02:21 AM   #4
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I made a pretty straightforward American Amber, very close to Conroe's recipe, and did it completely on my own (without any reference to the BJCP). Only today did I review the BJCP guidelines and discover that I'd hit it right on the head!

BU:GU 0.71, the hydrometer samples taste marvelous, with a good hop bite. I'm going to rack it directly to the keg from my conical at the 3 week point, and then carb it for a week or two before serving.

khiddy's "Summerbrau"

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Old 05-07-2009, 05:43 AM   #5
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As a follow-up, I've just taken a hydro reading, and though it's been 4 days since the last one, I'm still at 1.020. I think that's way too high (and hopville.com told me to look for 1.014), so I figure I'm stuck. It could be that this is the first time I've used my conical fermentor, so perhaps I dropped too much trub too often (though I was dropping it out no more than every other day, and not too much each time, either...). Any ideas?

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Old 05-07-2009, 11:54 AM   #6
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Conroe View Post
I don't agree with what you say about the hops, nor does the BJCP. Other than that nice article.
Really.

Quote:
West Coast versions tend to have more intense hop character and be more heavily tilted towards hop flavors than East Coast versions, which are often more balanced.
That's a simple fact, easily discerned through actually researching the style.

Here's what I had to say about hops:

Quote:
HOPS As with the grist, choose only domestic hops varieties in AAA. Most commercial examples use one or a blend of the "Big C"s - Cascade, Chinook, Centennial - as part of the defining character.
Here's what BJCP has to say about hops:

Quote:
Low to moderate hop aroma from dry hopping or late kettle additions of American hop varieties. A citrusy hop character is common, but not required.
Moderate to high hop flavor from American hop varieties, which often but not always has a citrusy quality.
Looks pretty obvious that BJCP and I agree pretty closely. Granted, my definition is a bit tighter, but that's not disagreement. See below.

Since BJCP formulated the style entry based on the sources from which I drew my article, that makes sense. Unless, of course, you have some insight into or information on the matter of which I am unaware; if you do, kindly cite your source, because I'm keen to see it.

In my article, I advise brewers to use distinctively American hops varieties because the style is distinctly American. If you brew AAA with Kent Goldings, it ain't AAA. If you brew AAA with Saaz, it ain't AAA. It might still be Amber Ale, but it isn't American Amber Ale. Willamette is an American variety, but its flavor is - in my opinion, mind - not sufficiently distinctly American.

If you're disagreeing with my post above, wherein I wrote that I like a nice smack of flavor/aroma hops, I invite you to evaluate a few of the BJCP benchmarks, all of which have that characteristic: Tröegs HopBack Amber (my favorite), St. Rogue Red, Mendocino Red Tail, and Boont Amber.

Kindly explain what's to disagree with. I enjoy learning new things.

Regards,

Bob
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Old 05-07-2009, 01:01 PM   #7
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Quote:
Originally Posted by BJCP
American hops, often with citrusy flavors, are common but others may also be used.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Wiki
Avoid domestic varieties based on European ancestors (Willamette is a Fuggle cultivar, as Liberty is Hallertau).
There seems to be some disagreement here. Your last post makes it even more clear.
Quote:
In my article, I advise brewers to use distinctively American hops varieties because the style is distinctly American. If you brew AAA with Kent Goldings, it ain't AAA. If you brew AAA with Saaz, it ain't AAA. It might still be Amber Ale, but it isn't American Amber Ale. Willamette is an American variety, but its flavor is - in my opinion, mind - not sufficiently distinctly American.
Heck, Bud American Ale fails by your definition and then not by the BJCP's.
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Old 05-07-2009, 02:50 PM   #8
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Oh, come on, dude. I hate to say it, but that's pretty much a textbook example of "pedantic".

Just because 'others may be used' doesn't mean you should use them. Didn't your mother ever tell you, others could jump off bridges, but that doesn't make it a good idea?

My last paragraph, which you kindly highlighted, proves my point. All I'm trying to say is this: If you're going to brew a style, brew it in a manner that's instantly recognizable to a palate with a little bit of experience. If you go out on a limb far enough that it isn't recognizable as the style anymore, what's the point of calling it by that style name? Might as well throw in some Black Patent and Chocolate malts; it's legal under the BJCP description, look:

Quote:
May also contain specialty grains which add additional character and uniqueness.
BP and Choco malt will certainly add character and make it unique! Never mind it becomes a Porter; it's still legal under the American Amber Ale BJCP description according to the Conroe Interpretation Method!

Sheesh.

Bob

P.S. Interesting that you think Bud American Ale fails. Which Cascades do you think they're dry-hopping with? Argentine? How else does it fail? American malts? Check. American hops for flavor/aroma? Check. Clean, low-ester yeast? Check.
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Old 05-07-2009, 10:25 PM   #9
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I don't know what your problem is. This is simple reading comprehension I learned in the third grade. Others may be used means just that.

Quote:
P.S. Interesting that you think Bud American Ale fails. Which Cascades do you think they're dry-hopping with? Argentine? How else does it fail? American malts? Check. American hops for flavor/aroma? Check. Clean, low-ester yeast? Check.
Saaz, Willamette, even Palisades fail by your own words. You say to avoid them. AB does not agree with you either. I really can't tell that there are any Cascades in it any way. It must be like an 1/8 once or less to five gallons.

Quote:
Never mind it becomes a Porter; it's still legal under the American Amber Ale BJCP description according to the Conroe Interpretation Method!
Now your just being a smart ass. Go and tastes some ambers and if your taste buds are as good as mine you will taste small quantities of some of the dark malts. Not enough to make it a Brown ale, but there none the less. You will find them even in some Pale ales.

I know my writing skills may be lacking, but my reading comprehension is much better than that of your own.
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Old 05-07-2009, 11:16 PM   #10
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Conroe View Post
I don't know what your problem is. This is simple reading comprehension I learned in the third grade. Others may be used means just that.
Let me try this one more time: You're right. All I'm saying is that just because you can doesn't mean you should or that it's a good idea.

Quote:
Saaz, Willamette, even Palisades fail by your own words. You say to avoid them.
Yes, I do. For the reasons in my article and explained just above.

Quote:
AB does not agree with you either. I really can't tell that there are any Cascades in it any way. It must be like an 1/8 once to five gallons or less.
Weird that their own marketing materials don't list any of the above, but do list Cascades from the Pacific Northwest. It's on the front page of the Budweiser American Ale website, fer Crissakes.

Let me make this abundantly clear: A/B agrees with me. Unless and until you list some credible source that says otherwise, you're simply and inarguably wrong. I don't know why you'd persist in that fiction.

Quote:
Now your just being a smart ass. Go and tastes some ambers and if your taste buds are as good as mine you will taste small quantities of some of the dark malts. Not enough to make it a Brown ale, but there none the less. You will find them even in some Pale ales.
No arguments there. Ed Tringali, one of the brewers who defined the style, used a very small proportion of roasted barley for color. He was not alone.

I was pointing out the silliness inherent in your original argument, which was, paraphrased, "The style description permits it, so you can use it." Not even taken to extremes, that can take the beer out of style. Like I used in an example before, using East Kent Goldings as flavor/aroma hops makes it decidedly not American Amber Ale, even though the BJCP style sheet says it's permissible. I was illustrating my point by taking your argument to an extreme.

Quote:
I know my writing skills may be lacking, but my reading comprehension is much better than that of your own.
That's called an ad hominem attack, and it furthers nothing. Attack my arguments all you like; you lose all credibility when you attack my person.

Thanks for playing.

Regards,

Bob
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