The Great Bottle Opener Giveaway

Home Brew Forums > Home Brewing Beer > Recipes/Ingredients > The science of hop pitching

Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools
Old 02-05-2014, 11:48 PM   #11
edgeoftheUS
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Aug 2012
Location: Bham, WA
Posts: 19
Liked 4 Times on 3 Posts
Likes Given: 5

Default

Everything I needed to know about hops i learned from Mitch Steele's (founder of Stone) IPA book.

http://www.amazon.com/IPA-Brewing-Te.../dp/1938469003

okay, not everything but he did pave the way for craft breweries, posts all of their recipes online, and goes through all of the hopping techniques and gives examples to compare to such as RR Pliny, Dogfish, Stone, etc.

__________________
edgeoftheUS is offline
pdrewcock Likes This 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 02-06-2014, 12:30 AM   #12
Calder
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Mar 2010
Location: Ohio
Posts: 5,398
Liked 237 Times on 212 Posts
Likes Given: 2

Default

I don't think he is challenging anything; just wondering why people do different things and is there a way to measure the effect.

Every hop you add except dry hops will add to the bitterness. The earlier you add them, the more IBUs they impart. Measurement is a relative measurement, and everyone will get different results. There are some tools to help measure the IBUs, but they are not absolute, just approximations, and different people prefer using different programs for it.

Although you get more IBUs, the longer you boil, some feel you get a harsher bitterness with a longer boil. It is a journey to discover what you like. Me, I usually add a small charge at 60, and use a lot of hops spread out from 15 minutes in to get my IBUs. This way I get more flavor and aroma too, but I do use more hops than you will find in a basic recipe.

Late hops give flavor and aroma. Generally late hops are added at 15 minutes to go. More flavor at 15 minutes than aroma, and more aroma at 0 mins. You do get some flavor with the early hops, but not much.

__________________
Calder is offline
pdrewcock Likes This 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 02-06-2014, 03:45 AM   #13
Marc77
HBT_SUPPORTER.png
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Jun 2011
Location: Kansas City, MO
Posts: 304
Liked 49 Times on 38 Posts
Likes Given: 6

Default

First wort hopping is actually a much older technique that we "rediscovered" recently.

__________________
Marc77 is offline
pdrewcock Likes This 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 02-06-2014, 04:28 AM   #14
splattsmier
Burton Brewhouse
HBT_SUPPORTER.png
Feedback Score: 11 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: May 2012
Location: Conroe, Texas
Posts: 491
Liked 125 Times on 86 Posts
Likes Given: 209

Default

It's all about the acids and oils.

Hop acids/oils contribute bitterness, flavor, aroma, and can even effect head retention. The delicate hop oils boil off the longer they are in the kettle, aroma being the first to go. That's why aroma additions are late kettle/flameout/whirlpool or dry hopped. Flavor additions are added toward the end of the boil (say, 20-5 min left).

As mentioned earlier it's a sliding scale, so different addition times will contribute different combinations and with different intensity.

Hope this somewhat simple explanation helps. Welcome and cheers!

Sent from my SAMSUNG-SGH-I777 using Home Brew mobile app

__________________
Untappd me: splattsmier

Untappd my homebrew: BurtonBrewhouse

MY CELLAR: http://www.cellarhq.com/cellar/ScottyP

Quote:
Originally Posted by Billy-Klubb View Post
"They can try to pry the mash paddle from my cold, dead hands."
splattsmier is offline
pdrewcock Likes This 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 02-11-2014, 04:41 AM   #15
pdrewcock
HBT_SUPPORTER.png
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Feb 2014
Location: Quesnel, B.C.
Posts: 12
Liked 2 Times on 2 Posts
Likes Given: 11

Default

Thanks to all for your explanations and links. I have much to learn, but it's beginning to make more sense.
Cheers! Pete.

__________________
pdrewcock is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 02-11-2014, 04:57 AM   #16
SilverZero
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Sep 2011
Location: Bend, OR
Posts: 684
Liked 30 Times on 24 Posts
Likes Given: 39

Default

I found this post pretty well-written - and it has pictures!

Just to add to the info a couple of posts up: If you add hop-stands to all of these techniques, you will get aroma and/or flavor without adding any IBUs because the temperatures at which you steep are below the isomerization levels for the alpha acids (or, at least, low enough that isomerization is greatly slowed down - can't stop kinetics!). I do 40 minute hop stands at 150F-160F.

I tend to FWH for most of my IBUs using a hop that complements my late hops, as there will be some flavor imparted. If I'm using a super-high AA hop like Summit, I'll just do a 60-minute boil to avoid getting its flavors. I never add anything else before 15 minutes, and typically only in the last 10 minutes (especially if I FWH). I do big hop stands and usually dry hop as well, since I typically make APAs and IPAs. Because I want to.

__________________
SilverZero is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 02-11-2014, 05:21 AM   #17
IvanBrew
HBT_SUPPORTER.png
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Jul 2013
Location: Livonia, Michigan
Posts: 209
Liked 22 Times on 16 Posts
Likes Given: 11

Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by pdrewcock View Post
Hi all,
I'm fairly new to the art of brewing. I have MADE beer for many years, but only recently begun to pay close attention to what I'm putting in it. ie: going beyond the basic recipe.
So I got to wondering in my double IPA fog, if boiled hops are for bittering, and dry hopping is for aroma, why are some recipes written to pitch hops 1/2 an oz at a time 10 minutes apart in the boil starting from 60 minutes until flameout. Is this actually an art or just a whim? Sometimes it just seems random, and in fact I watched a video where the brewers rolled dice for the times that the hops were pitched. Why aren't all the hops pitched at 60 minutes to maximize efficiency? Am I being kinda crude here? Maybe my tastebuds aren't fully developed yet.
Cheers! Pete D.
It's an art if your understanding of it comes intuitively, but if you're inclined to research and study, it is much more a science...

The bitterness imparted by hops comes through isomerization of the alpha acids. Isomerization happens during boil, and the longer you boil, the more alpha acid is isomerized.

Flavor and aroma is largely (but not completely) imparted by the beta acids in hops, which do not isomerize during the boil. In fact, they are more volatile, and are driven off by boiling.

To retain flavor and aroma, the boil time has to be short.

This is a horrifically over-simplistic view. There are hundreds, if not thousands, of compounds in hops that contribute to flavor and aroma. According to Wikipedia (which no academic would ever cite, lol), "about 250 components of essential oils have been identified."

The shorter answer, as others have mentioned, is that the longer you boil, the more bitterness you impart. The shorter you boil, the less bitterness and more flavor/aroma you get. Dry hopping is almost entirely about aroma, but aroma definitely affects perception of flavor...

Alright, now even I'm confused. I need to go have another beer...
__________________
IvanBrew is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 02-11-2014, 07:22 PM   #18
Buna_Bere
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
Recipes 
 
Join Date: Jan 2009
Location: Boston, MA
Posts: 258
Liked 21 Times on 19 Posts
Likes Given: 3

Default

science and beer colliding, long live iipa's

__________________
Buna_Bere is offline
 
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Reply


Quick Reply
Message:
Options
Thread Tools


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
science! backsweat Fermentation & Yeast 12 02-27-2012 01:09 PM
Science cch0830 Beginners Beer Brewing Forum 6 10-21-2011 08:00 PM
NPR Science Friday: The Science of Beer and Brewing straycat General Beer Discussion 2 12-02-2010 10:38 PM
Who knows the science of what goes on? billdog General Beer Discussion 5 10-10-2010 05:11 PM
science at its best Matt Foley General Beer Discussion 6 07-22-2007 10:42 PM