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-   -   Samuel Adams Winter Lager (http://www.homebrewtalk.com/f12/samuel-adams-winter-lager-83016/)

GolgiApparatus 10-05-2008 06:30 PM

Samuel Adams Winter Lager
 
Next weekend, I would like to brew up an extract version of SA Winter Lager. So far, I have found this ingredients list and it looks promising.

5 Gallons
OG - 1.069
FG - 1.016
IBU - 29
SRM - 19
ABV - 6.9%

2.75 lbs. light dried malt extract
4.0 lbs. Light liquid malt extract (late addition)
1.0 lb. wheat malt
1.5 lbs. munich malt
1.5 lbs. crystal malt 60L
1.0 oz. Curacao Orange Peel (bitter orange peel)
0.5 oz. ginger root (freshly grated)
0.5 tsp. Cinnamon (powdered)
9.5 AAU East Kent Golding hops (60 mni)
4AAU Tettnanger hops (2 min)
4AAU Hallertau Hersbrucker hops
White Labs WLP830 (German Lager)

I'll calculate out the hops at my LHBS when I see what they have on hand.

My question is what instructions should I follow? When do you add spices...secondary, boil? Etc...

This will be my first lager, but I have made some pretty good ales so far (about 20-25 batches). Any lagering advice would be awesome. I do have a spare fridge and a chilly basement. :rockin:

HOOTER 10-06-2008 12:26 AM

Am I the only one who thinks 4 lbs. of grains is a bit much?

GolgiApparatus 10-06-2008 03:50 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by HOOTER (Post 882116)
Am I the only one who thinks 4 lbs. of grains is a bit much?

Apparently. No one has a comment.

BarleyWater 10-06-2008 03:56 AM

I don't think that is too much grain, but it does have to be mashed. You can't steep Munich, but a mini/partial mash isn't that much different from steeping, you just have to watch the temp closer.

HOOTER 10-06-2008 04:32 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by BarleyWater (Post 882354)
I don't think that is too much grain, but it does have to be mashed. You can't steep Munich, but a mini/partial mash isn't that much different from steeping, you just have to watch the temp closer.

True. I assumed that because it's stated as an extract recipe that the grains were being steeped. Hey Golgi, are you planning on doing a partial mash?

GolgiApparatus 10-06-2008 05:03 PM

I wasn't planning on it...in fact, I don't even know how. Only steeped before. Any suggestions?

BarleyWater 10-06-2008 06:33 PM

Partial Mashing is just steeping at a constant temperature for a specific amount of time. Unless you want to trade out the Munich malt for Munich extract, you need to mash. When mashing, you want to keep the grain at a constant temp, around 155 would be ideal for you. Here's an article from Brew Your Own magazine, explaining partial mashing, and it is using four pounds of grain like you... BYO - Countertop Partial Mashing

Chad 10-06-2008 06:34 PM

Deathbrewer's Easy Partial Mash tutorial and BYO's Counter Top Partial Mash article will get you started. It really isn't all that different from steeping. You just have to pay a little more attention to the crush of the grain and the steeping temperature.

For the crush, just make sure the grains are indeed crushed. You can extract sugars from crystal malts in a steep even if the grains aren't crushed. You can't do that with base malts. Just make sure that the homebrew shop crushes them for you.

The next hurdle is temperature (and time). Unlike steeping where temperature can be a little hit or miss without ill effect, you'll want to keep your mash somewhere between 150 and 158 over the course of 30 minutes to an hour. You can do that by adjusting the heat on the stove up and down or you can bring your mash to temperature and put the covered pot into a preheated oven on the "warm" setting. Check the temp every 15 to 20 minutes to make sure you are within range. If you have a spare small cooler, you can use that instead of the stovetop or oven. Put the grains in a grain bag or paint strainer bag from the hardware store, bring your water (about 1.25 to 1.5 quarts per pound of grain) to 10 above your mash temp (so 165 or so), preheat the cooler with some of the water, dunk your grain bag in there, stir up the grains, add the rest of the water, stir a little more, check your temperature and close up the top. Nothing to it. If you've done steeped grains before you'll be amazed at how easy a partial mash is.

Chad

GolgiApparatus 10-06-2008 06:49 PM

Thanks for the advice!! Is this the road to AG? lol

Anbrew 10-06-2008 10:29 PM

As far as lager advice, make a BIG yeast starter. At least four pints of 1.040 wort.


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