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Old 05-08-2013, 09:05 PM   #1
Nico93
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Default Russian Imperial Stout

Hi! I'm going to brew this type of style in the next month!

this is the recipie:

Ricetta per stout, finals liters 20,0 (pre-boil liters 24,5)
efficienza 72%, bollitura 60 min.
OG 1,128; IBU: 100,4 (Tinseth); EBC: 124;
Malti:
4000 gr Pale Malt, Maris Otter, 1,038;
700 gr Chocolate Malt, 1,030;
700 gr Roasted Barley, 1,028;
400 gr Crystal 75L, 1,034;
1000 gr Peated, 1,038;
500 gr flaked barley, 1,033;
3000 gr Light, 1,037;
200 gr sugar Candy, Amber, 1,040;
Luppoli e altro:
14 gr Goldings, East Kent, 6,0 %a.a., 30 min, Kettle;
14 gr Goldings, East Kent, 6,0 %a.a., 10 min, Kettle;
100 gr Columbus (Tomahawk), 14,0 %a.a., 60 min, Kettle;
20 gr Chinook, 13,0 %a.a., 60 min, Kettle;
yeast:
Scotish Ale
Mash Steps:
50 °C 10 min
68 °C 80 min
78 °C 15 min

what do you think about? what i have to change?

Thanks You So much from Italy, and sorry for my english

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Old 05-08-2013, 09:41 PM   #2
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There's some questions I have about your recipe. First off, I'm concerned with your 1000 grams (2.2 lbs) of peated malt. Have you ever brewed with Peated Malt? It is quite strong. If you want a touch of smokey flavor in this Russian Imperial stout, I recommend Rauch Malt instead. It's got a much better smoked flavor in my opinion, and you only need about half that for a 19L (5 Gallon) batch. Use 1 kilo of Peated Malt, and I promise you will have a smoke bomb.

Second—what's the flaked barley for? Usually, this is used as a substitute for Flaked Corn, if you didn't want that corn flavor or to add body to the beer. This Russian Imperial stout will have plenty of body without flaked corn. Simplify.

Third, why all the candi sugar? This is usually used as an adjunct to make a drier beer—usually when making a dubbel, trippel, belgian strong, etc. The roasted barley should add a bit of dryness to the beer.. I think that's all you need.

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Old 05-09-2013, 07:13 AM   #3
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i have never used the peated malt, but i read that is not very strong ! do you suggest me to use half kg? (1,1 lbs?)

i used flaked barley because i see that is used in a lot of RIS recipe! you say that it is better not to put it?

i used candi sugar only to correct og, i want start with 1120 and with a one liter starter i have to reach 1125 og point!

i changed the recipe with less peated and without sugar:

Ricetta per stout, final liters 20,0 (boil liters 24,5)
efficienza 72%, boil 60 min.
OG 1,129; IBU: 99,3; EBC: 120;
Malts:
4900 gr Pale Malt, Maris Otter, 1,038;
700 gr Chocolate Malt, 1,030;
700 gr Roasted Barley, 1,028;
400 gr Crystal 75L, 1,034;
500 gr Peated, 1,038;
500 gr Flaked barley, 1,033;
3000 gr Light, 1,037;
Hops:
14 gr Goldings, East Kent, 6,0 %a.a., 30 min, Kettle;
14 gr Goldings, East Kent, 6,0 %a.a., 10 min, Kettle;
100 gr Columbus (Tomahawk), 14,0 %a.a., 60 min, Kettle;
20 gr Chinook, 13,0 %a.a., 60 min, Kettle;
yeast:
Scotish Ale
Mash Steps:
50 °C 10 min
68 °C 80 min
78 °C 15 min

what do you think about?

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Old 05-09-2013, 01:49 PM   #4
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I wouldn't use peated malt at all. Rauch Malt is much milder than Peated Malt and offers a superior flavor in my opinion. See threads like these:

http://www.brewboard.com/index.php?showtopic=88062

http://www.homebrewersassociation.org/forum/index.php?topic=4782.5

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Old 05-09-2013, 01:55 PM   #5
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I agree, ditch the peated malt all together. An oz or two can be really noticeable in 5 gallons, so if you use it, only use a tiny bit.

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Old 05-09-2013, 02:24 PM   #6
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What is "Light" under your malt bill? Pale malt?

Otherwise, I suggest lowering or dropping the peat malt as well. If you want it, maybe try 50-100g at most. Flaked barley is generally used to increase body, unlike corn, which usually does the opposite. Keep it if you want, but with an OG at the level this recipe has, you're going to have plenty of body regardless. The protein rest isn't necessary, but probably won't hurt anything either. Your sacc mash temp is a little high - use it if you want a really thick beer, drop it down a couple degrees if you want better attenuation.

This is important. You're going to need more than a little 1L starter. Use a pitching rate calculator to get your ideal pitch rate. You're going to need a lot of yeast for this thing.

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Old 05-09-2013, 02:46 PM   #7
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Agree strongly with Guld's last point. For yeast, I find it easier to make a standard gravity red, porter, or irish dry stout batch first. Either drop the RIS wort directly on top of that yeast cake, or wash and pitch 3-4 cups of yeast slurry.

Otherwise I would go with at least a 1 gallon starter. You don't want a 1.129 stalling out high.

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Old 05-09-2013, 02:57 PM   #8
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thanks you so much for the help!

recipe changed!

Ricetta per stout, final liters 20,0 (boil liters 24,5)
efficienza 72%, boil 60 min.
OG 1,129; IBU: 99,3; EBC: 120;
Malts:
5300 gr Pale Malt, Maris Otter, 1,038;
700 gr Chocolate Malt, 1,030;
700 gr Roasted Barley, 1,028;
400 gr Crystal 75L, 1,034;
100 gr Peated, 1,038;
500 gr Flaked barley, 1,033;
3000 gr Light, 1,037;
Hops:
14 gr Goldings, East Kent, 6,0 %a.a., 30 min, Kettle;
14 gr Goldings, East Kent, 6,0 %a.a., 10 min, Kettle;
100 gr Columbus (Tomahawk), 14,0 %a.a., 60 min, Kettle;
20 gr Chinook, 13,0 %a.a., 60 min, Kettle;
yeast:
Scotish Ale
Mash Steps:
50 °C 10 min
67 °C 80 min
78 °C 15 min

it's now ok? What should I change?

are the ibu ok?

@guldtuborg: light is dme liquid extract!

I'm going to make a three steps starter (on the stir plate)! 1 liter with og 1050, after add another liter at 1060, cold crash, add to the compacted yeast another one liter with 1080 og points.

after the oxigenation i'am going to put in the wort all the last liter
I hope I made ​​it clear

what do you think about?


edit: @solbes: with the university i haven't got enought time to make two brew day in a short time

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Old 05-09-2013, 06:17 PM   #9
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Again, I think you're over complicating things for yourself. No need for a multiple step starter. While a lab might be great at doing this, at home you increase risk of contamination every time you expose yeast to the outside or transfer it.

Your starters should always generally be 1.030-1.040 or so specific gravity. The reason is, you're trying to GROW healthy daughter yeast cells and increase the cell count. Trying to "acclimate" the yeast to the final wort you want to ferment is not the purpose of making starters. Yeast will actually be less healthy and "stressed" in a higher gravity wort because of factors like osmotic pressure, and the higher toxicity due to higher levels of alcohol. Think of it as: you're building an army to go and eat that maltose sugar. You don't want a bunch of beat up exhausted soldiers.

Use a pitching rate calculator like the famous Mr. Malty calculator: http://www.mrmalty.com/calc/calc.html

And start with 2 yeast packets if you have to, but no need to do a multiple step starter. Do you have a stir plate?

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Old 05-09-2013, 08:01 PM   #10
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Ok! i have to make a 3 liters starter at 1040 and add to the wort only compacted yeast (crash cold in fridge)

i'd tried to use this calculator http://yeastcalc.com/ but it said that i had to make 3 step starter (og 1040) 2liters-2liters-1liters in order to have enought yeast!





What do you suggest me?

P.s. this is my homemade stirplate

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