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Old 03-12-2013, 12:01 PM   #1
NewkyBrown
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Default Recipe suggestion for first AG batch

Hi all

Can someone recommend a tried and tested recipe from the database that I can brew this weekend. It will be my first attempt at all-grain and I want to keep it fairly simple.

I would also like a beer that is ready to drink quickly without a long conditioning time!

I prefer ales, light or dark and have access to most grains and hops.
Thanks in advance.

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Old 03-12-2013, 05:02 PM   #2
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Sure. So basically you'll want to stay away from: High gravity beers, anything with wheat or rye, and/or anything with a complicated mash schedule.

Centennial Blonde is a great first beer. It's easy to brew, and it's ready to drink quickly.
Bee Cave Pale Ale is another.
If you want something more English, Common Room ESB is a great recipe.

Basically, look for anything that's pretty simple, without a complicated mash schedule. If any of these recipes has a 'mash-out' or any other step, skip it. Just keep things good and simple for your first go around.

There are two things you should absolutely do for your first all grain batch:
A. Test your wort chiller for leaks if you haven't used it before.
B. Have .5-1 gallon of boiling water and a couple hand full of ice cubes handy before the mash. It's a total-guessing game for what temperature your mash will equalize at the first time around. Having the boiling water and ice cubes handy will help you quickly adjust the mash temp should you miss it (either too hot, or too cold).

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Old 03-12-2013, 05:44 PM   #3
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I'm a big fan of ESB's, so that was the first batch I put together. Used a really simple recipe:

9# Maris Otter
1# Crystal 60L

2oz fuggle@60
1oz ekg@15
1oz ekg@5

wyeast london esb (1968)

In my experience, the maris otter ensures you have a good efficiency which can be comforting on that first batch.

Oh, just realized you said "from the database." It's a recipe from northern brewer where I just swapped willamette for fuggle. But I can confirm that it's both easy to brew, and quite tasty.

Make sure you have a buddy to help you with some of the schlepping in exchange for future beer!

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Old 03-12-2013, 05:54 PM   #4
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A Sierra Nevada Pale Ale Clone would also be easy and quick:

6 gallons
75% efficiency
OG: 1.052
FG: 1.011

10.5lbs American 2-row
14oz Crystal 60 (English Medium Crystal would be preferred)
Mash at 152-153*

1oz Magnum @ 60
1oz Cascade @ 15
2oz Cascade @ 0

Oh, and add some irish moss or whirlfloc to the kettle with 10-15min left in boil.

Ferment with California Ale yeast. If you use Wyeast 1056 or White Labs WLP001, make a starter. Personally, I would recommend buying 1 pack of US05. Just mix the dry yeast into a glass of 90-95* water to rehydrate, stir with a sanitized spoon, and 15 minutes later, pitch it into the fermenter. It's cheaper and easier. Works just as well.

Ferment at 64-67* F. Give the primary roughly 10 days for the yeast to 'fully' do their thing, and then bottle or keg.

That should be a super easy first batch that will taste great, and give predictable results.

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Old 03-12-2013, 06:07 PM   #5
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If you have Brewing Classis Styles book, one of my best batches of an APA was the one on pg 135, all-grain option.

From the same book, another great option is Janet's Brown on pg 143.

Neither have anything special about the mash (except Janet's Brown has some hops in the mash) or any significant amount of wheat to cause draining problems.

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Old 03-12-2013, 10:02 PM   #6
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Thanks for the recommendations. Looks like a pale ale would be the choice. I just want something to drink fast while I brew more advanced beers!

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Old 04-23-2013, 02:47 AM   #7
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Quote:
Originally Posted by scottland
A Sierra Nevada Pale Ale Clone would also be easy and quick:

6 gallons
75% efficiency
OG: 1.052
FG: 1.011

10.5lbs American 2-row
14oz Crystal 60 (English Medium Crystal would be preferred)
Mash at 152-153*

1oz Magnum @ 60
1oz Cascade @ 15
2oz Cascade @ 0

Oh, and add some irish moss or whirlfloc to the kettle with 10-15min left in boil.

Ferment with California Ale yeast. If you use Wyeast 1056 or White Labs WLP001, make a starter. Personally, I would recommend buying 1 pack of US05. Just mix the dry yeast into a glass of 90-95* water to rehydrate, stir with a sanitized spoon, and 15 minutes later, pitch it into the fermenter. It's cheaper and easier. Works just as well.

Ferment at 64-67* F. Give the primary roughly 10 days for the yeast to 'fully' do their thing, and then bottle or keg.

That should be a super easy first batch that will taste great, and give predictable results.
Made this recipe about 6-7 weeks ago and just tried the first bottle - I am over the moon! Looks, smells and tastes amazing! The only slight criticism is there is a slightly dry aftertaste but i can live with that.
Thanks for the recipe.
Centennial blonde next!
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Old 04-23-2013, 02:57 AM   #8
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I recently made a beer with 10lb of pale malt, reused Nottingham, and a couple ounces of Amarillo hops. The beer turned out fantastic--clear, good malt flavor, good head, and super tasty. Honestly I would rate it as one of the best beers I've made. Proof that you don't need a complicated recipe.

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